Are You Addicted to Video Games?

There's nothing wrong with watching some sport, as long as you're not obsessed or cucked by it.

I watch boxing regularly. I train it, and love the sport. Why is that a vice?

It the vicariousness of it that is the problem. As much as some who make it their religion. Like fake achievements that MMOs unfortunately simulate. It is inherently vicarious.
 

Bamboozler

Pigeon
I don't care if a grown man wants to dress up a little guy and make him run around a tv doing things, i'm not better than you. But have some shame. It's a stupid thing to waste our time and money on and we should act like it.
I'm just speechless when I see grown-up men on YouTube, showing off their toy collections (collectibles of all kind: mascots, figurines and other garbage). How come the're not embarrassed ?

Gaming's a jealous hobby, it doesn't tolerate any other. The more you keep gaming, the more dysfunctional you become, and that's a fact, folks. At some point you should take your diaper off and deal with the real world. Stop being pathetic.
 

El Draque

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I'm just speechless when I see grown-up men on YouTube, showing off their toy collections (collectibles of all kind: mascots, figurines and other garbage). How come the're not embarrassed ?

Its easy to sneer, but honestly i dont care what people like this do with their spare time. It seems pathetic to me, but are they harming people with it? It's just a hobby, admitably quite a tragic one, but good luck to them, it's their choice.
 

Cartographer

Pelican
Gold Member
Its easy to sneer, but honestly i dont care what people like this do with their spare time. It seems pathetic to me, but are they harming people with it? It's just a hobby, admitably quite a tragic one, but good luck to them, it's their choice.
Why do you say he's sneering? And his second sentence outlines the concern. It's one thing to enjoy a little gaming on the side, but it often turns men into obsessive weirdos. Especially young guys who might not know any better. It's not entirely harmless. No one's saying they shouldn't be allowed to make their own mistakes, though. Has anyone here said we should ban video gaming? No.
 

bmw633

Woodpecker
I play games every evening, but I also cook dinner, watch a good film or tv show, walk the dog, read, workout and have sex with the missus (not necessarily in that order), and see no issue with that.

As long as you dont do anything to extremes, why not enjoy your leisure time doing whatever you want?

What I wouldnt waste my time doing, is going online and picking a subject, saying how I used to do something that was, in my opinion, bad. Then tell everyone how I was so weak I got addicted to it. Then tell everyone else who can enjoy that activity without being addicted that they are bad for enjoying such an evil thing.

But, Im not some holier than thou scumbag who gets feels from telling everyone how much better I am than them.
Thought my post might help someone besides you, since you obviously have everything in you life under control. Very happy for you.
 

Batman_

Kingfisher
There's nothing wrong with watching some sport, as long as you're not obsessed or cucked by it.

I watch boxing regularly. I train it, and love the sport. Why is that a vice?

Watching boxing, especially if you are an actual boxer, is fine. But the overwhelming majority of sports fans do not play sports - instead they watch them on the couch eating potato chips. In general most sports fans are caricatures of men who think that watching sports makes them masculine and like supporting "their" team to give them a sense of belonging to a tribe. It's just as much of a waste of time as video games.

But my grander point is that having a vice or two is fine if you can keep them under control. I don't think anyone can get by in this world indefinitely without having a single vice to keep them grounded.
 

El Draque

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Watching boxing, especially if you are an actual boxer, is fine. But the overwhelming majority of sports fans do not play the sports but instead watch them on the couch eating potato chips. In general most sports fans are caricatures of men who think that watching sports makes them masculine and supporting their "team" gives them a sense of belonging to a tribe.

Indeed.

Just look at England fans if you ever want to see a group socially engineered to nth degree.

The (hilariously failed) Three Lions Pys-op of the summer comes to mind.

A manager who is described as being 'part of the Deep Woke', by even the British government, conspired to have his final three penalty takers in the European cup final to be young and black, despite having substantially less experience and ability at the task than older white players.

The stage was set for these Three Lions to win it for England, and a psy op about a "new English identity" to be birthed.

Hilariously they were terrible and Italy, a side with not one non-white player in their entire 24 man squad, won the cup.

 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
I quit almost cold turkey when I started courting my current wife. Had a couple relapses while we were still in the dating phase, so yes I would say I was addicted to video games. I thank God for helping me to get over that. Once we got married my wife showed me a list of things she was looking for in a husband that she wrote with a friend many years ago and one of the requirements was "he doesn't play video games."
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
A series I have enjoyed a lot is Assassin's Creed.
There are over a dozen installments, and they are really milking the franchise for every penny they can get, but honestly I've learned a good bit about history and particularly art and architecture from the game. One of the earliest in the series is set in Florence, Italy, and you do a good bit of climbing around these famous buildings and then "synchronizing your view" which helps trigger your memory through flashbacks, allowing you to play more missions.

These viewpoints are often from prominent real structures, and the plot often revolves around them. When I visited Florence, and saw the candy striped Duomo that I was already very familiar with from playing the game, I found myself already very familiar with a city I had never visited before.

Also I find the plot interesting. There are two forces, the Assassins and the Knights Templar, and throughout history they have been behind every major event, and as you are replaying these events and meeting people like Michaelangelo and George Washington and Da Vinci, you are influencing them as an Assassin, while the other side is doing the same, and sometimes you get philosophical arguments between the "everything is permitted and nothing is forbidden" pro-democracy Assassins and the heirarchical New World Order templars who are determined to save humanity from itself.

The game philosophy has gotten far sloppier with the later installments, which focus more on making the graphics as beautiful as possible while you just go around mindlessly killing "bad guys" to earn experience points, but it's still fun and interesting even if the plot is weak.

They change enough about the Templars and Assassins so that they don't quite mirror any real organization in history, though the game often does cover very real events that were indeed controlled by elites, just not quite the same groups in the game. It is certainly more thoughtful than many games.

The fundamental assumptions of Templar philosophy correlates closely to those of classical realism. Invariably, Templars harbour cynical views of human nature, focusing principally on their history of endlessly repeating conflicts and acts of conquest and subjugation.They hold it to be self-evident that human beings are inherently self-serving, irrational, susceptible to corruption, and disingenuous towards others and that these are flaws which can never be fully overcome, only suppressed through discipline enforced by authority.

This premise sits at the heart of their conflict with their archenemies, the Assassins, who not only profess to a faith in humanity but also reject that any objective truth can be known, thereby treating the Templars' generalization of human nature as illogical.
 

NickK

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I used to play wargames. Games like War in the Pacific or The Operational Art of War, which is a game engine that can recreated any battle in history with accuracy from the army group down to the squad level.
I simply found war history and military strategy fascinating.

But in the end, it grew to an obsession. I had dreams about shooting down Zeros, where to refuel my carrier group or delivering X amounts of supply to base Y.
At that point, any hobbie has become unhealthy.
 

Transsimian

Ostrich
Gold Member
Watching boxing, especially if you are an actual boxer, is fine. But the overwhelming majority of sports fans do not play sports - instead they watch them on the couch eating potato chips. In general most sports fans are caricatures of men who think that watching sports makes them masculine and like supporting "their" team to give them a sense of belonging to a tribe. It's just as much of a waste of time as video games.

But my grander point is that having a vice or two is fine if you can keep them under control. I don't think anyone can get by in this world indefinitely without having a single vice to keep them grounded.
Watching sports makes you an athlete as much as watching porn makes you a sex god.
The stage was set for these Three Lions to win it for England, and a psy op about a "new English identity" to be birthed.

Hilariously they were terrible and Italy, a side with not one non-white player in their entire 24 man squad, won the cup.
Italy had white players in their squad?
Italy had men in their squad?
AP21192807880711.jpg
 

DeWoken

Robin
I'd class the likes of Civ (certainly Civ2 & 3, which were my goto back in the day) as being effectively sophisticated boardgames, distinct from what i think of as video games (first person shooters, sports simulators etc).
Interesting observation.
I haven't played video games since my teen and early-twenties years.
And games with deliberately addictive mechanics that is far worse for you. Like lootboxes and Skinner boxes. Also when it is pay to win just like real gambling.
However, I hear that there are innovative types of games like simulators for driving a truck, managing a graveyard, managing a railroad empire, or building a colony on the moon or a tropical island. What is the saying, "computers are a bicycle for the mind"? I hear that if you look into the smaller games, staying away from the big budget ones, you can find a lot of quality. The gambling aspect of modern games is very worrying.

Steve Jobs, "Computers are like a bicycle for our minds." - Michael Lawrence Films
 
I used to play wargames. Games like War in the Pacific or The Operational Art of War, which is a game engine that can recreated any battle in history with accuracy from the army group down to the squad level.
I simply found war history and military strategy fascinating.

But in the end, it grew to an obsession. I had dreams about shooting down Zeros, where to refuel my carrier group or delivering X amounts of supply to base Y.
At that point, any hobbie has become unhealthy.
It helps for video games to have a story and a beginning and endpoint.

Having no endings like in Online multiplayer which ends the game massively facilitates obsession as much as the various addictive mechanics.

Likewise with padding that features grinding.
 

SmilingSun

Pigeon
Orthodox
I haven't played video games in a while, but I am sometimes longing for them.

When I was a kid, I was really into RTS (Warcraft 3, Rise of Nations, Age of Empires, Dawn of War, this sort of thing) and later Dota. Eventually, I started playing World of Warcraft and stayed there for a year or two, but then stopped. After that, I haven't played for about 10 years, but a while ago I got into Dota 2. As a result, in the span of 5 years I put a couple thousand hours in it. It didn't impact my career progression or social life (I have never been into going out), but at some point I realized this has turned into an unhealthy obsession, even though I thoroughly enjoyed it. For me, finishing a coding pet project, implementing new functionality in it, running longer than usual, or finally drawing a somewhat decent cartoonish face or body is fun, exciting and potentially useful, but it doesn't really bring me as much joy as carrying a game all on my own or getting a rampage while playing my main hero. It may sound pathetic, but that's how I perceive it. Maybe that's why it's hard for me to judge people who love gaming - takes one to know one, I guess.

About 2 years ago I stopped gaming and got into coding (Python/JS) and started dabbling in drawing. Coding doesn't really help my with my day-to-day job projects, but I enjoy it and I am under the impression that I am actively thinking and using my brain. Funnily enough, sometimes when I am stuck on a programming problem, I can spend hours trying to solve it, without realizing how time has flown by - this reminds me of gaming, in that you think of playing a game or two, but then spend your whole day on it.

Even now I often think that it would be great to relax and play a few turns in Total War, but then I realize that this time would be better spent on my coding pet projects or drawing or working out. But the desire to play is still there, it's just not as intense, because I have other distractions and have the willpower not to focus on gaming urges.

Here is a video on this topic that I found useful and a bit inspiring, and that I sometimes rewatch. Maybe it will inspire someone who is trying to shift their focus from gaming to other more useful pastimes and who has read this wall of text:
 

Hephaestus

Sparrow
About 2 years ago I stopped gaming and got into coding (Python/JS) and started dabbling in drawing. Coding doesn't really help my with my day-to-day job projects, but I enjoy it and I am under the impression that I am actively thinking and using my brain. Funnily enough, sometimes when I am stuck on a programming problem, I can spend hours trying to solve it, without realizing how time has flown by - this reminds me of gaming, in that you think of playing a game or two, but then spend your whole day on it.
I'm trying to cultivate that attitude, thank you for the advice. I've played games for many thousands of hours, and I can't imagine how good a programmer I'd be if I invested my time differently.

The Hyde video is great, especially when he talked about having the right opinions doesn't matter unless you are great at at least one thing. I've wasted a tonne of time arguing about inflamatary issues with nothing to show for it.

One point I'd disagree is the mid-thirties cut off. My neighbour growing up was a renowned professor but what was most remarkable was he only started studying when he was laid off at 60. He got his PhD at 67 and had a twenty year career afterwards. It really never is too old, as long as you are willing to put the effort in to break set in habits.
 
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