Asian flu epidemic 1957-58

puckerman

Ostrich
While there has been a lot of talk about the big flu epidemic of 1917-8, there has been almost no talk of the Asian flu epidemic of 1957-8. Does anyone remember it? Do you have parents who talked about it?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1957–58_influenza_pandemic

It killed about 116,000 Americans. The population was about 170 million at the time. That is about 6.8 out of 1000 people.

Today we have a population of almost 330 million. That would mean almost 225,000 deaths at the same ratio.

I don't think my parents or grandparents ever talked about it, and history almost seems to have forgotten about it. I guess that is what happens when it's all business as usual.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
That and the fact that, after emerging in February 1957, the vaccine for it was first tested in July 1957, and was available from October 1957. Call me insane, but I'd imagine the main reason it was the 1957-1958 Asian pandemic was because you could vaccinate against it from the 7, as in, same year it first came out. Oh, and also the fact that antibiotics weren't around in 1918 but were in general use by the time Marty McFly invented rock and roll at the Enchantment Under the Sea Dance.
 

Sherman

Ostrich
Good find. They didn't have a 24/7 mass media back then to spread fear. It's interesting that it spread to the US, even though Red China back then was isolated from the world.
 

puckerman

Ostrich
I need to correct my original post. It was actually 6.8 people out of TEN THOUSAND people. That was only in America.

One key fact is that people traveled a lot less. Most people did not fly at all. Very few Americans traveled to countries outside of Canada and Mexico. Many people never went more than 200 miles from home.

We are experiencing the first truly world-wide epidemic. It is has touched every country in the world in only four months. This truly is unprecedented.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Even in the 1950s, you still had several million traveling salesmen, sports fans (think packed college football stadiums), domestic tourists, students driving/taking the train home for xmas, truckers etc. More than enough to keep the bug churning across the land.

Pre-WW2 with travel by cruise liners that took weeks to cross it might have been more of a barrier, but even there you can think of some passengers coming down with the virus towards the end of their trip. Still it wasn't enough to prevent the second wave in the Spanish Flu in the winter of 1919.
 

Emancipator

Hummingbird
Gold Member
911 said:
Even in the 1950s, you still had several million traveling salesmen, sports fans (think packed college football stadiums), domestic tourists, students driving/taking the train home for xmas, truckers etc. More than enough to keep the bug churning across the land.

Pre-WW2 with travel by cruise liners that took weeks to cross it might have been more of a barrier, but even there you can think of some passengers coming down with the virus towards the end of their trip. Still it wasn't enough to prevent the second wave in the Spanish Flu in the winter of 1919.
The mass movements of troops largely facilitated the process.

Out here in the West the troops coming home via trains were forced into quarantine camps. News of the illness reached before they could. Hence Alberta getting harder hit than BC despite smaller population.

irg 1957 Asian flu, I know older family friend that in Toronto there was a mini "panic" as in people upped their normal hygiene practices, but most saw it as a nothingburger.

There were a lot more deaths from disease/virus back then so people came to expect it in life.
 
Paracelsus said:
That and the fact that, after emerging in February 1957, the vaccine for it was first tested in July 1957, and was available from October 1957. Call me insane, but I'd imagine the main reason it was the 1957-1958 Asian pandemic was because you could vaccinate against it from the 7, as in, same year it first came out. Oh, and also the fact that antibiotics weren't around in 1918 but were in general use by the time Marty McFly invented rock and roll at the Enchantment Under the Sea Dance.
Or - or - this "pandemic" similar to the one in 1918 was caused by the vaccine since it began to spike as the first cases "were tested" with the new vaccine. The tests were so successful that they killed the first tens of thousands.

[attachment=43685]
 

puckerman

Ostrich
911 said:
Even in the 1950s, you still had several million traveling salesmen, sports fans (think packed college football stadiums), domestic tourists, students driving/taking the train home for xmas, truckers etc. More than enough to keep the bug churning across the land.

Pre-WW2 with travel by cruise liners that took weeks to cross it might have been more of a barrier, but even there you can think of some passengers coming down with the virus towards the end of their trip. Still it wasn't enough to prevent the second wave in the Spanish Flu in the winter of 1919.
There is no comparison nowadays. Herb Kelleher once pointed out that when Southwest Airlines began that maybe 70% of Americans had never flown in an airline. Flying was a luxury for the wealthy in the 1950's, especially international travel.

Keep in mind that Major League Baseball didn't move to the West Coast until 1958. People used trains for long-distance travel. They also drove cars. Flying was a luxury at the time.
 
Thanks for the thread, because it shows the insanity of historical "pandemics in a new light".

The asshat saw a pandemic supposedly in Asia, then started producing the vaccine from may onward.

THE VACCINATIONS STARTED IN JULY!!!!!!!

The first flu vaccine lots were produced in June, within weeks of Hilleman’s request. Vaccinations started in July. The influenza pandemic hit the U.S. in early September (just as Hilleman predicted). Forty million doses were given over the next three months.
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/the-man-who-beat-the-1957-flu-pandemic/

It peaked around the peak of the vaccination craze and thus you can easily claim that with 99,9999% certainty the US medical mafia stupidity/corruption/depopulation division killed 116.000 people. The kill-rate of the vaccine was 0,3%, though other side effects like paralysis, Guillian-Barre-syndrome (a typical post-vaccination sickness that also Franklin Roosevelt got when he was 39 back during the post WWI vaccination kill-off - 1920) etc.

[attachment=43707]
The overall death rate started right with the advent of the frigging vaccines!!!!

Oh - yeah vaccines made it all happen and disappear within 2 months without any lockdowns.

The vaccines killed and were pulled off the market while the flu was blamed for it. Seems like the con gets warmed up again and again.
 

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