Ask a mechanic

Gazeebo

Pigeon
Orthodox
I have a 2017 Ford transit with high roof. I replaced the battery 6 months ago and it was fine until last week. I needed a jump from Aaa and it has been fine since but anticipate as it gets colder I’ll need my own portable starter battery. I have a Ford transit 350 with high roof and want to pick the right charger. There was one from Walmart for 450 dollars that I ordered but it was a cancelled because it was out if stock

Schumacher ProSeries 12V/24V 4400 Peak Amp Jump

Is this my best bet? I can get it from Amazon for a bit more. Or should I just ask at my local auto zone?
Eradicator, looked up your vehicle and I found a link to a Ford transit forum. Maybe some good info can be found for some specifics for your model.

 

Gazeebo

Pigeon
Orthodox
I mean learning about a vehicle inside out. I have a working car but it is very computer-centric. I'd like to mess with a rat rod one day.
If you just want a beater to learn how to work I would suggest a older civic. Probably find a cheap one that can barely run but if you put some effort into fixing should be worth it.

Tool wise it could be alot of things but you 100% need a set of wrenches (metric prefered), ratchet with some sockets, maybe a small impact with quick connect adapters, that should be a baseline.
 

Kiwi

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Screwdriver and plier sets. Some good adjustable grips. If you're keen buy a small tool box full of tools. Plenty of tool suppliers sell basic small tool kits ready to go.

If I lived in America i'd buy an old pick up truck.Like an f 150 or an old chevy. Heaps of room to work on and pretty basic systems. Plus the old ones are classic. Though maybe they're expensive now or hard to get, I wouldn't know. Just love the look.
 

Pointy Elbows

Woodpecker
Orthodox
A long time ago, I bought this book:


Paul Weissler's Weekend Mechanic's Handbook

I still own this book and refer to it a couple times per year.

At the time, I was hobby working on an old Ford V8 289 CI motor - a classic carbureted engine used in many Fords. This is an excellent book, with really good diagrams and simple explanations. It teaches the basics of internal combustion engines and has a chapter on each of the primary systems in a car, plus your basic repairs.

Now fuel injected systems - that's another thing for me.

Agree with Kiwi - such old trucks are simple and fun to tinker.
 

sophistic-ated

Pigeon
Protestant
A long time ago, I bought this book:
Thanks I picked it up

If you just want a beater to learn how to work I would suggest a older civic.
I'll look around on craigslist. I got the tools you mentioned.
Screwdriver and plier sets. Some good adjustable grips. If you're keen buy a small tool box full of tools. Plenty of tool suppliers sell basic small tool kits ready to go.

If I lived in America i'd buy an old pick up truck.Like an f 150 or an old chevy. Heaps of room to work on and pretty basic systems. Plus the old ones are classic. Though maybe they're expensive now or hard to get, I wouldn't know. Just love the look.
I like the idea of getting a pickup truck as well. I will build a storage unit my garage to sort all this new stuff this weekend. :D
 

Blade Runner

Ostrich
Orthodox
I've got a random question about ergonomics and seat positioning when driving, if anyone has knowledge about that and wants to answer here or PM, I would appreciate it.
 

Doubting Thomas

Sparrow
Catholic
My left brake light went out, but the tail light still works. Last April one of the tail lights burned out so I replaced them both with LED lights, so I figured they should last longer than that. I swapped the bulbs on the left and right to see for sure if it was just a bulb issue, but after swapping them it was still the left brake light that wasn't working. I guess this has to be some sort of an electrical issue then? And idea if this will be an easy fix?
 

Kiwi

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
My left brake light went out, but the tail light still works. Last April one of the tail lights burned out so I replaced them both with LED lights, so I figured they should last longer than that. I swapped the bulbs on the left and right to see for sure if it was just a bulb issue, but after swapping them it was still the left brake light that wasn't working. I guess this has to be some sort of an electrical issue then? And idea if this will be an easy fix?

You could swap the bulb holder or tail light (complete) from right to left, plug it in and see if it works with the bulb that works.
If it works you've found your fault. If not you have to work backwards and check for power at the connector, when you operate the brakes.
 

Jive Turkey

Woodpecker
Other Christian
I have a carbureted truck from the 80s

It sometimes dies at idle, though after replacing the rotor cap less frequently. Also sometimes when getting up to speed it lurches real bad and then takes off. IE the engine goes glug..glug..glug..GLUUUUUUG and then usually drive good for a while after that.

I just got the truck recently. Will do spark plugs, air filter and spark cables. If it is a vacuum leak how do I go about diagnosing it?
 

Kiwi

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
A couple of things it could be.

- Fuel related; bad fuel condition, blocked fuel filter, carb fuel/air mixture is out of whack needing adjustment or repair. Checking spark plug condition can give you some clues (checking images online will help guide you) Does the vehicle smoke, especially when cold?

- Ignition related. On a vehicle with Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) this symptom of lurching then smoothing out, is more often than not spark plug leads. So if you're going to replace them with plugs that's a good idea.

Vacuum leaks are a more consistent fault. They certainly will make the car die at idle, especially with carb engines as the mixture can easily be thrown out and not as precise as EFI engines.
Take a look around your engine for any perished or collapsed vacuum lines going to your carb or inlet manifold. You can sometimes hear a hissing or sucking sound when the engine is running, though not always.
You can also spray something like a brake cleaner around vacuum lines, or around inlet manifold and if the idle changes you've found the leaking area - but please if you're gonna use this method BE CAREFUL. Any spray around hot components, like exhaust can ignite and cause a fireball (it happens)

Do the plugs, make sure they are gapped correctly and leads. Do a fuel filter too. Go from there.
 

Sargon2112

Robin
Protestant
My left brake light went out, but the tail light still works. Last April one of the tail lights burned out so I replaced them both with LED lights, so I figured they should last longer than that. I swapped the bulbs on the left and right to see for sure if it was just a bulb issue, but after swapping them it was still the left brake light that wasn't working. I guess this has to be some sort of an electrical issue then? And idea if this will be an easy fix?
Have a look at the bulb socket contacts. Could just be dirty or corroded contacts in there. Have someone hold the brake pedal down and wiggle the bulb in the socket - be careful to not break your bulb. If it flickers on you'll know it's a problem with the socket.
 

bobman492

Chicken
Catholic
I have a Toyota corolla 1999, the reader said cylinder misfire. Any idea of the problem and how much it cost to fix? My brother in law who good w cars said maybe it's the vacuum seal.
 

Jive Turkey

Woodpecker
Other Christian
I have a Toyota corolla 1999, the reader said cylinder misfire. Any idea of the problem and how much it cost to fix? My brother in law who good w cars said maybe it's the vacuum seal.
Not saying this is your car. But I have fixed cylinder misfires by replacing spark plugs, coil packs, distributors, spark plug cables, throttle position sensors, and crank sensors. Hope this helps. But if a sensor is out usually the code will tell that. Good luck!
 
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