Avocados Part II: Gen X millionaire tells Gen Y to get a job

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
SamuelBRoberts' earlier thread is here.

Thought this might want its own discussion since this time it's an American millionaire who's telling Gen Y to lift itself up by its own nose hairs.

A MULTI-millionaire businessman says Generation Y should stop living with parents, refuse familial support and “do their own damn laundry”.

The US television star’s straight-talking view goes against the increasingly accepted idea that young people now need to rely on their mothers and fathers to get ahead.
Marcus Lemonis, a serial entrepreneur who appears on CNBC reality show The Profit, also thinks graduates should avoid joining the family business and instead work for “somebody that could and will fire you.”

He said there were two important things millennials should do as soon as possible after graduating. The first was to take any job they could find, just to get into the work routine as quickly as possible — without taking any time out to relax first. “I know you’re historically used to summer break, but summer break is over,” said the 43-year-old. “Get a job.”

The wage doesn’t matter, according to the Lebanese-American investor and CEO, who says qualified young people should find any kind of work, even if it just pays $16 an hour. “It’s better than you sitting at home making zero dollars,” he added.

His second piece of advice is to get out of the family home and into the real world as quickly as possible. “My best advice for the graduating class of 2017 would be don’t stay home too long,” he explained. “Do your own damn laundry, and cook your own food, and get your own job. Pay your own bills.”

But Gareth Robinson from Australian financial services firm MoneyLab says there may be a third way, suggesting Gen Ys could live with parents, as long as they had “a set time and goal in mind”.

He told news.com.au it could work as long as young people were careful the money they saved did not simply become disposable income. “Breaking into the property market is a worthwhile reason to save your pennies at home but the money you save on rent should go into savings not be spent on a nicer lifestyle,” he said.
Mr Robinson said there was a crucial difference between getting support and being reliant on family. “A helping hand is different to a handout, it’s only when they don’t plan to utilise and appreciate that privilege that they should refuse,” he said.

“Turning the support into a slingshot to success is admirable and worthwhile, using it as a crutch to avoid hard work and growth is not.”

He agreed that Gen Ys should put off working for a family business until they had built “significant career experience” outside it. “Working for your family straight out of school is not ideal, you need perspective and to cut your teeth in the real world first,” he said.

Almost a third of young people between the ages of 18 and 34 are either yet to leave their parents’ home, or are “boomerang kids” who have returned to the nest. The trend has been labelled “the Costanza Effect”, after Seinfeld character George, and research has discovered this cohort is typically less happy than their counterparts who do not live in the family home.

A report by Australian Unity Wellbeing in December found that the wellbeing of those living with their parents is the lowest it has been in 10 years.
As house prices continue to rise, and real wages stagnate, the frequency with which debt-ridden young people return home is likely to rise.

Comedian James McCann, 25, recently wrote of how he had just moved back to his family home after a fourth “failed exodus”. The Aussie comic said his parents were “lovely”, and “almost as supportive” as they had been when he first moved back in, but admitted they would all much rather be living apart, citing issues including arguments, lack of privacy and a loss of independence.

Self-made millionaire Mr Lemonis was born in wartorn Lebanon and adopted by a couple living in Florida at nine months old. Aged 12, he started a lawn mowing service and then opened a lolly store. While he worked in the family business of automotives, he made his fortune in RVs and camping accessories.

In 2008, Ernst & Young named him Entrepreneur of the Year and he appeared on NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice in 2011 and 2012 and ABC’s Secret Millionaire in 2012 before finding fame on The Profit.

The reality show, now in its fifth season, sees the charismatic Mr Lemonis providing expertise to struggling companies across the country.

His mantra is “people, process and profit” — the three qualities he believes all businesses need to succeed.
Lemonis is a classic liberal moron. His degree from university was political science with a minor in criminology, and right after graduating he ran for office as a Democrat. Having failed at that, he went right back into the automotive business. He is also not "self-made". As far as "poor, impoverished" upbringings are concerns, he was born in Lebanon ... aaaaaand then adopted as an infant by the owners of one of the largest Chevy businesses in the United States; Lee Iacocca was his mentor, for Christ's sake, and he went back into the family business at, oh, the age of 25 or so, after failing at his run for office.

I've highlighted one element because it is appallingly bad advice. The rest of it is at best neutral and/or Marie Antoinette advice.

Let's leave aside that Lemonis is basically self-promoting and promoting his TV show. What he seems to be doing with that advice is indicating that the world of hard knocks will teach you more about life than school does, which is nice and all, but it's perfectly possible to waste your time at work as it is in a liberal arts course; they don't call it a "dead end job" for nothing, and if the job you're doing is not going to reasonably fulfil your needs or desires, be looking around constantly for one that does. (The ideal is that you're doing some work while studying.)

Take the Australian moron who's going home for the fourth time. At 25. Who lists his job as comedian. For fucking real? But hey: he was probably encouraged by the same parents to "follow his dreams", so can you really blame him for shit parenting?
 
The wage doesn’t matter, according to the Lebanese-American investor and CEO, who says qualified young people should find any kind of work, even if it just pays $16 an hour. “It’s better than you sitting at home making zero dollars,” he added.
It's not terrible advice, but I can't help but thinking it sounds like the man who just broke your legs selling you on the virtue of getting a wheelchair.

Needless to say, he has to go back.
 

ElFlaco

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Almost a third of young people between the ages of 18 and 34 are either yet to leave their parents’ home, or are “boomerang kids” who have returned to the nest.
A useless statistic. They need to break that down more finely by age. There's a big difference between 18 to 22 year olds (might be in college) and home and thirty-somethings.

The wage doesn’t matter, according to the Lebanese-American investor and CEO, who says qualified young people should find any kind of work, even if it just pays $16 an hour. “It’s better than you sitting at home making zero dollars,” he added.
Paracelsus said:
I've highlighted one element because it is appallingly bad advice.
Sounds like good advice for the masses. Would being unemployed at home be better than working? For the vast majority, no.
 
Also "Even if it just pays 16$ an hour" is hilarious.

Not 15 minutes ago I was talking to a friend of mine about a second job he had to pick up just to pay off his debts.
"It pays 11$ an hour," he said, "which is really good!"

Dude is so incredibly isolated from the realities of the 2017 labor force that he has no useful advice to give.
 

brick tamland

Kingfisher
"Take any job. Buy a house as soon as possible etc. etc."

I'd like to hear him explain in his own words exactly why so many young people can't move out of home at age 19 or 22.
 
This guy is delusional. It's easy to toss around the "life yourself up by the bootstraps advice" when you've already got it made. People like this are always lecturing others on what they should do.

It's much harder to find a job today because automation and machine learning has phased out many blue and white collar jobs. Your skill set does not matter.

The tuition and mortgage rates are also out of control. I could say a lot more here but don't feel like ranting.

Living with your parents and accepting some of their support will actually help anyone move out sooner.
 

Atlanta Man

Ostrich
Gold Member
Here is a current legal opening I was emailed this morning....

Consilio Services is currently staffing a Barred Anywhere document review project with substantial overtime in our Miramar office. This project will start on Wednesday May 7th and is expected to last 1 week (including weekend hours). The rate is $20 per hour and all overtime will be paid at time and a half.

Candidates must be Barred Anywhere and available for the duration of the project.

Consilio Services offers (free parking,) flexible work hours, health insurance and a 401k plan.

If you are interested and available, please send your resume (include where you are barred in the resume) to [email protected] and in the subject line write “OT Project” and a recruiter will be in touch regarding oral conflicts ASAP.
If you have any questions or concerns please let me know.
Thanks!

$20 for a fucking Lawyer(with a State Bar License) per hour, and I can assure you the staffing agency will have more attorney resumes than slots available. Please show me the $16 dollar per hour jobs for undergrads-Fuck Marcus.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
ElFlaco said:
Almost a third of young people between the ages of 18 and 34 are either yet to leave their parents’ home, or are “boomerang kids” who have returned to the nest.
A useless statistic. They need to break that down more finely by age. There's a big difference between 18 to 22 year olds (might be in college) and home and thirty-somethings.

The wage doesn’t matter, according to the Lebanese-American investor and CEO, who says qualified young people should find any kind of work, even if it just pays $16 an hour. “It’s better than you sitting at home making zero dollars,” he added.
Paracelsus said:
I've highlighted one element because it is appallingly bad advice.
Sounds like good advice for the masses. Would being unemployed at home be better than working? For the vast majority, no.
I'm not suggesting people should to wait around for the perfect job, but at the same time you do have to have some eye to the long term when you're picking a job, too.
 

Kabal

Pelican
Gold Member
Atlanta Man said:
Here is a current legal opening I was emailed this morning....

...

$20 for a fucking Lawyer(with a State Bar License) per hour, and I can assure you the staffing agency will have more attorney resumes than slots available. Please show me the $16 dollar per hour jobs for undergrads-Fuck Marcus.
Yup, welcome everyone to the dystopian arms-race of credential-inflation!

If your JD is not Tier 1 and you don't satisfy some diversity quota of ours, congrats and go fuck yourself.

If your MBA is not from an M7 and you don't satisfy some diversity quota of ours, congrats and go fuck yourself.

We are, however, accepting unpaid internship applications from STEM PhD holders, Tier1 JDs, and M7 MBAs.


I enjoyed my educational and professional experiences, and I felt like I learned a lot. However, I still think the government-induced arms-race in credentialism is horseshit, which has the predictable effects in company and corporate hiring practices.

For example, at my last job, a 3.8ish CalTech dual-major in Mathematics and [other quantitative subject] was rejected without second-thought for a summer internship position (albeit, East Asian American).
 

IvanDrago

Pelican
Gold Member
I made $4.25/hr at my first job at the dreaded Walmart in the mid 90s when I could first legally work. I unloaded trucks in 105F heat, pushed carts in -30F blizzards and wiped up shit and blood whenever some nasty bitch destroyed the bathroom. I got a nickle per year raise over 4 years.

The 4 year employment on my resume led to a factory job making $9/hr lifting heavy shit on and off an assembly line in where the thermometer read 120F in the summer for two years. I eventually was able to move in to the IT department there. That led to a better IT job that paid $10 plus they paid for college. That led to a job that paid the average income for a family of 4 in my area at age 25. From there I got a job as a developer, where I was able to freelance and move in to what I am doing now, making more money than most small business owners I know in a low stress job that sends me all over North America, but still allows me more free time than anyone I know. No debt, never owned a credit card.

Where do you guys who take part in these threads expect to start off in life? Before this gets out of hand let me say, you guys are assholes :) :) :)
 

Leonard D Neubache

Owl
Gold Member
Sounds like the gravy train has some sand in its gears and the passengers have some sand in their vaginas.

"Waaah! Disposable income rates have punched a hole in the floor and my portfolio is looking glum! If you young people just got a job and leveraged your pitiful incomes to load up five credit cards then I could see out my twilight years in the luxurious comfort to which I've become accustomed!"

Well I'm not heartless. Here's something for your portfolio...

[img=300x200]http://i.imgur.com/7kIyE0r.png[/img]

...phaggot.
 

Suits

 
A lot of people work lousy jobs when they are young and working their way through schooling. A lot. I know this because I worked a lot of lousy jobs between age 9 and 29 and I met lots of young (and older) people who did what they had to do. And they bitched about it a lot less than I did.

The problem happens when after piling up tens of thousands in debt, they still can't get a much better job that back before they completed their university degree.
 
IvanDrago said:
I made $4.25/hr at my first job at the dreaded Walmart in the mid 90s. I unloaded trucks in 105F heat, pushed carts in -30F blizzards and wiped up shit and blood whenever some nasty bitch destroyed the bathroom. I got a nickle per year raise over 4 years.

The 4 year employment on my resume led to a factory job making $9/hr lifting heavy shit on and off an assembly line in where the thermometer read 120F in the summer for two years. I eventually was able to move in to the IT department there. That led to a better IT job that paid $10 plus they paid for college. That led to a job that paid the average income for a family of 4 in my area at age 25. From there I got a job as a developer, where I was able to freelance and move in to what I am doing now, making more money than most small business owners I know in a low stress job that sends me all over North America, but still allows me more free time than anyone I know.
Well, I guess if you started out in the mid-90s and were able to move up the ladder to a factory job (which are mostly gone now) to an IT job (which are mostly gone now), somebody starting out in 2017 should be able to do just as well. Because nothing's changed in 20 years, I guess?

Where do you guys who take part in these threads expect to start off in life?
It's not about where you start off. The shit starting jobs like McDonalds, etc. are still available. But the next rungs on the ladder, the factory and IT jobs in your case, are gone now for most people. The poor jobs are still there. The jobs for the rich, or highly talented, are still there. But the good middle class jobs that used to be the fundamental building blocks of our society are gone. (For what it's worth, I'm typing this in a spacious apartment, on my couch in front of a big screen TV, so don't interpret my comments as "Why is the world so mean to MEEE?" The world's been very good to me, better than I deserve, honestly. But the people who are coming into the work force now are getting fucked.)

Before this gets out of hand let me say, you guys are assholes :) :) :)
I won't deny that.
 

iop890

Crow
Gold Member
SamuelBRoberts said:
Also "Even if it just pays 16$ an hour" is hilarious.

Not 15 minutes ago I was talking to a friend of mine about a second job he had to pick up just to pay off his debts.
"It pays 11$ an hour," he said, "which is really good!"

Dude is so incredibly isolated from the realities of the 2017 labor force that he has no useful advice to give.
I was thinking the same thing. The temporary second job I left earlier in the year paid $13.50 and I was pretty happy with it.

I don't really see a future in being an employee.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
IvanDrago said:
I made $4.25/hr at my first job at the dreaded Walmart in the mid 90s when I could first legally work. I unloaded trucks in 105F heat, pushed carts in -30F blizzards and wiped up shit and blood whenever some nasty bitch destroyed the bathroom. I got a nickle per year raise over 4 years.

The 4 year employment on my resume led to a factory job making $9/hr lifting heavy shit on and off an assembly line in where the thermometer read 120F in the summer for two years. I eventually was able to move in to the IT department there. That led to a better IT job that paid $10 plus they paid for college. That led to a job that paid the average income for a family of 4 in my area at age 25. From there I got a job as a developer, where I was able to freelance and move in to what I am doing now, making more money than most small business owners I know in a low stress job that sends me all over North America, but still allows me more free time than anyone I know. No debt, never owned a credit card.

Where do you guys who take part in these threads expect to start off in life? Before this gets out of hand let me say, you guys are assholes :) :) :)
Yes, IvanDrago, but we know you always win. FOR YOU!
 
The issue is that every Tom, Dick, and Harry has a college degree these days. One of the sacred cows of the "manosphere" is that you should only go to college for STEM. Well guess what? Those jobs aren't hiring either! Credentialism is the problem. When everyone has a credential, the credential becomes worthless. This is what the Bernie losers don't understand, giving everyone a college degree isn't "leveling the playing field," it's making a BA/BS worthless.

My view is that the United States needs to focus more on teaching skills, whatever they may be, rather than selling the idea that you can study a particular field and somehow find employment with it. I'm not that old (early 20s), and I have skills that a lot of guys my age don't. Basic home repairs, plumbing, carpentry, electricity, automotive, all of these are things my father taught me very early on.
 
iop890 said:
I was thinking the same thing. The temporary second job I left earlier in the year paid $13.50 and I was pretty happy with it.

I don't really a future in being an employee.
It's like saying "You need to find a girl to date, even if she only has 33C tits instead of 36DD, and only gives you blow jobs 5 times a week instead of 7." While it might be true, it doesn't really bear much relationship to reality.

It's not so much you, or the other people on the forum I'm worried about. The people who congregate here tend to be pretty smart, and tend to have their eyes open to new opportunities. It's the rest of the country I'm worried about. I've said this before here, but I've got no desire to live my life in a gated community with barbarian hordes outside, dependent on heavily armed and highly paid security to keep from being robbed and torn apart, like how they live in Brazil. Sure, it beats living in the slums, but it's far from an ideal situation.
 
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