Baby Formula Shortage…?

Kitty Tantrum

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
Oh, I just remembered!

There was a Yahoo Group back in the day called MilkShare -- it looks like it has since moved to a different space on the internet, but still exists. It is for women who want to donate milk directly, and women seeking direct donor milk for their babies, rather than going through milk banks (which incur huge processing costs, and I find their claims of "screening" for safety to be dubious at best).

I learned about it while I was pregnant because I was also worried about supply issues.

After making sure my diet and hydration were sufficient, and using a pump in addition to nursing on-demand, I ended up with a bit of an oversupply and donated on a regular basis to a local baby who had bad digestive reactions to the vast majority of formulas (mom had a breast reduction previously, thinking she was done having kids).


I think my problem was due to a 4 day delay between birth and when I got my milk supply. I hope it comes in faster this time.
By then, he was using a fast flow bottle nipple and had zero interest in the breast, which takes more work for babies than just dumping milk in their mouth. I was pumping, but the pump was not super efficient for me. The fit may have been incorrect. I am looking into buying a couple different pumps this time in hopes of finding one that I respond to better. I have a different plan up my sleeve, but I still feel crappy thinking of how things went the first time.
This happens a lot, and the difficult truth is that while your milk supply was probably slower coming in because it was your first baby, the situation was probably a lot more normal than anyone counseling you wanted you to believe, or understood themselves.

For the first few days, you do not actually have milk. Only colostrum, which is measured in units from drops to teaspoons or tablespoons. A lot of women panic, thinking that their baby is starving. In reality, these tiny amounts are entirely appropriate, for a few big reasons:

1. Baby is not really used to digesting yet.
2. Colostrum is absurdly nutritious and a tiny bit goes a long way.
3. Ravenous nursing stimulates milk production.

Your baby is SUPPOSED to seem like they're starving for the first few days, because that's what signals the body to ramp up production so that supply can meet the ever-growing demand. They will go through bouts of this "mom I am literally starving what is wrong with you" behavior at regular intervals forever, so get used to it and don't let it scare you too much.

What often happens is that women assume or are told that they are not making enough milk, and that if they don't supplement with formula or pumped milk, it might negatively affect the baby. So mom nurses the baby until she's out of milk, then stops nursing and gives the baby a bottle, while pumping. Then two primary things happen:

The baby loses interest in nursing, because bottles are easier, and being sated reduces/eliminates the desire to nurse for comfort.

Milk production decreases, because pumping is far less efficient than nursing and the body will adjust supply based on outflow.

(And if formula is added in, that compounds these factors further. Supplementing with formula most often ensures the continued need for formula.)

In most cases, if the mother had a wise woman at hand to help calm her rather than stoking her fears about her body being deficient or her baby "not gaining weight fast enough," she could simply resign herself to an intensive and probably frustrating period of nursing around the clock and almost never getting out of bed for a few days, and then things would be fine and baby would thrive.

Editing to add: I've seen some newer pumps that at least LOOK like they would do a better job of mimicking the mechanisms of nursing. But you can also make a cheap one go a LONG WAY by getting one with removable/replaceable flanges and making sure you're using the correct size of flange -- AND purchasing or rigging up a "hands-free pumping bra" to keep everything in place and free up your hands. Then you can relax (which is critical) and maybe distract yourself by doing something else, or if necessary you can augment the suction of the pump by applying methodical manual pressure to the milk ducts.
 
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ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
Oh, I just remembered!

There was a Yahoo Group back in the day called MilkShare -- it looks like it has since moved to a different space on the internet, but still exists. It is for women who want to donate milk directly, and women seeking direct donor milk for their babies, rather than going through milk banks (which incur huge processing costs, and I find their claims of "screening" for safety to be dubious at best).

I learned about it while I was pregnant because I was also worried about supply issues.

After making sure my diet and hydration were sufficient, and using a pump in addition to nursing on-demand, I ended up with a bit of an oversupply and donated on a regular basis to a local baby who had bad digestive reactions to the vast majority of formulas (mom had a breast reduction previously, thinking she was done having kids).



This happens a lot, and the difficult truth is that while your milk production was probably slower coming in because it was your first baby, the situation was probably a lot more normal than anyone counseling you wanted you to believe, or understood themselves.

For the first few days, you do not actually have milk. Only colostrum, which is measured in units from drops to teaspoons or tablespoons. A lot of women panic, thinking that their baby is starving. In reality, these tiny amounts are entirely appropriate, for a few big reasons:

1. Baby is not really used to digesting yet.
2. Colostrum is absurdly nutritious and a tiny bit goes a long way.
3. Ravenous nursing stimulates milk production.

Your baby is SUPPOSED to seem like they're starving for the first few days, because that's what signals the body to ramp up production so that supply can meet the ever-growing demand. They will go through bouts of this "mom I am literally starving what is wrong with you" behavior at regular intervals forever, so get used to it and don't let it scare you too much.

What often happens is that women assume or are told that they are not making enough milk, and that if they don't supplement with formula or pumped milk, it might negatively affect the baby. So mom nurses the baby until she's out of milk, then stops nursing and gives the baby a bottle, while pumping. Then two primary things happen:

The baby loses interest in nursing, because bottles are easier, and being sated reduces/eliminates the desire to nurse for comfort.

Milk production decreases, because pumping is far less efficient than nursing and the body will adjust supply based on outflow.

In most cases, if the mother had a wise woman at hand to help calm her rather than stoking her fears about her body being deficient or her baby "not gaining weight fast enough," she could simply resign herself to an intensive and probably frustrating period of nursing around the clock and almost never getting out of bed for a few days, and then things would be fine and baby would thrive.

Editing to add: I've seen some newer pumps that at least LOOK like they would do a better job of mimicking the mechanisms of nursing. But you can also make a cheap one go a LONG WAY by getting one with removable/replaceable flanges and making sure you're using the correct size of flange -- AND purchasing or rigging up a "hands-free pumping bra" to keep everything in place and free up your hands. Then you can relax (which is critical) and maybe distract yourself by doing something else, or if necessary you can augment the suction of the pump by applying methodical manual pressure to the milk ducts
Oh, I just remembered!

There was a Yahoo Group back in the day called MilkShare -- it looks like it has since moved to a different space on the internet, but still exists. It is for women who want to donate milk directly, and women seeking direct donor milk for their babies, rather than going through milk banks (which incur huge processing costs, and I find their claims of "screening" for safety to be dubious at best).

I learned about it while I was pregnant because I was also worried about supply issues.

After making sure my diet and hydration were sufficient, and using a pump in addition to nursing on-demand, I ended up with a bit of an oversupply and donated on a regular basis to a local baby who had bad digestive reactions to the vast majority of formulas (mom had a breast reduction previously, thinking she was done having kids).



This happens a lot, and the difficult truth is that while your milk production was probably slower coming in because it was your first baby, the situation was probably a lot more normal than anyone counseling you wanted you to believe, or understood themselves.

For the first few days, you do not actually have milk. Only colostrum, which is measured in units from drops to teaspoons or tablespoons. A lot of women panic, thinking that their baby is starving. In reality, these tiny amounts are entirely appropriate, for a few big reasons:

1. Baby is not really used to digesting yet.
2. Colostrum is absurdly nutritious and a tiny bit goes a long way.
3. Ravenous nursing stimulates milk production.

Your baby is SUPPOSED to seem like they're starving for the first few days, because that's what signals the body to ramp up production so that supply can meet the ever-growing demand. They will go through bouts of this "mom I am literally starving what is wrong with you" behavior at regular intervals forever, so get used to it and don't let it scare you too much.

What often happens is that women assume or are told that they are not making enough milk, and that if they don't supplement with formula or pumped milk, it might negatively affect the baby. So mom nurses the baby until she's out of milk, then stops nursing and gives the baby a bottle, while pumping. Then two primary things happen:

The baby loses interest in nursing, because bottles are easier, and being sated reduces/eliminates the desire to nurse for comfort.

Milk production decreases, because pumping is far less efficient than nursing and the body will adjust supply based on outflow.

In most cases, if the mother had a wise woman at hand to help calm her rather than stoking her fears about her body being deficient or her baby "not gaining weight fast enough," she could simply resign herself to an intensive and probably frustrating period of nursing around the clock and almost never getting out of bed for a few days, and then things would be fine and baby would thrive.

Editing to add: I've seen some newer pumps that at least LOOK like they would do a better job of mimicking the mechanisms of nursing. But you can also make a cheap one go a LONG WAY by getting one with removable/replaceable flanges and making sure you're using the correct size of flange -- AND purchasing or rigging up a "hands-free pumping bra" to keep everything in place and free up your hands. Then you can relax (which is critical) and maybe distract yourself by doing something else, or if necessary you can augment the suction of the pump by applying methodical manual pressure to the milk ducts.
Thanks for this. And yes- I had read that the baby is supposed to lose weight and seem hungry. But they really put the pressure on and wouldn’t let me leave the hospital if I didn’t feed him the ready-to-feed with the fast flow nipple. Sigh…. Then there was my mother who never breast fed, of course, and thought I was just trying to overachieve or something at the expense of my baby. Baby had jaundice, was losing weight, etc…
Luckily, I’m with a midwifery group in a birthing center this time and we also don’t want visitors for a couple days, so that will help. Not sure how I will put off grandparents (who will most likely be watching my older child) from visiting for a couple days but I absolutely don’t want the interference on this.

You seem to know a lot about this subject- what pump brands do you recommend? Money isn’t a factor for this for us. I used medela with my son and didn’t like it at all, so not planning on that one. I did, however, like the medela calma breastfeeding bottle nipple. It was like $20 but so worth it because it did help recover some of our ability to breastfeed. I plan on having one of those on hand this time.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
But they really put the pressure on and wouldn’t let me leave the hospital if I didn’t feed him the ready-to-feed with the fast flow nipple.
I'm sorry. I got pressured into conceding a lot of "small" things at the hospital with my first baby as well, after "risking out" of home birth by going into labor a few days too early. Awful places for healthy births, hospitals. I'm glad you're receiving midwifery care this time.

You seem to know a lot about this subject- what pump brands do you recommend? Money isn’t a factor for this for us. I used medela with my son and didn’t like it at all, so not planning on that one. I did, however, like the medela calma breastfeeding bottle nipple. It was like $20 but so worth it because it did help recover some of our ability to breastfeed. I plan on having one of those on hand this time.
I had a Medela at one point and I did not like it much. They don't make them exactly the same anymore, but the one I had that I really liked ended up being one of the cheapest double-electric models on the market at the time, by Lansinoh. Looked like this:

1642791897353.png

It was better than anything else I found, because the motor was stronger and seemed to deliver better suction at a more conducive rhythm, and the flanges were removable, which made it easier to rig up hands-free, and I definitely needed a non-standard size so being able to change it out was important. I'm not sure what their current models are like, though! This was back in like 2009-2010.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I just remembered one of the more important features that set the model I had apart from others:

Ability to adjust speed and strength of cycle and suction INDEPENDENTLY from one another.

The Medela I used had a range of "settings" that were supposed to be "all that," but in all cases speed and suction were directly correlated and you could not achieve a very long, slow, but FIRM "draw." Slow was always weak. That was very bad.
 

Arby

Sparrow
Woman
Atheist
I want to add that it's probably best to try different techniques too. For me personally, it didn't matter so much which pump I was using (I tried both a hospital grade medela and a 30$ cheap pump off of amazon). But what mattered was that I sat down and really (really!) worked my breast with both hands. I was basically hand expressing with a pump attached. But it helped me get a lot of milk when the pump alone wasn't doing much. Also I got it done very quickly. When I was pumping exclusively I spent about 60-70 minutes a day pumping - I think it's recommended to spend at least two or three times that amount
 

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Oh, I just remembered!

There was a Yahoo Group back in the day called MilkShare -- it looks like it has since moved to a different space on the internet, but still exists. It is for women who want to donate milk directly, and women seeking direct donor milk for their babies, rather than going through milk banks (which incur huge processing costs, and I find their claims of "screening" for safety to be dubious at best).

THANK YOU! I'm bookmarking this for kiddo 2.
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
Oh, I just remembered!

There was a Yahoo Group back in the day called MilkShare -- it looks like it has since moved to a different space on the internet, but still exists. It is for women who want to donate milk directly, and women seeking direct donor milk for their babies, rather than going through milk banks (which incur huge processing costs, and I find their claims of "screening" for safety to be dubious at best).

I learned about it while I was pregnant because I was also worried about supply issues.

After making sure my diet and hydration were sufficient, and using a pump in addition to nursing on-demand, I ended up with a bit of an oversupply and donated on a regular basis to a local baby who had bad digestive reactions to the vast majority of formulas (mom had a breast reduction previously, thinking she was done having kids).



This happens a lot, and the difficult truth is that while your milk supply was probably slower coming in because it was your first baby, the situation was probably a lot more normal than anyone counseling you wanted you to believe, or understood themselves.

For the first few days, you do not actually have milk. Only colostrum, which is measured in units from drops to teaspoons or tablespoons. A lot of women panic, thinking that their baby is starving. In reality, these tiny amounts are entirely appropriate, for a few big reasons:

1. Baby is not really used to digesting yet.
2. Colostrum is absurdly nutritious and a tiny bit goes a long way.
3. Ravenous nursing stimulates milk production.

Your baby is SUPPOSED to seem like they're starving for the first few days, because that's what signals the body to ramp up production so that supply can meet the ever-growing demand. They will go through bouts of this "mom I am literally starving what is wrong with you" behavior at regular intervals forever, so get used to it and don't let it scare you too much.

What often happens is that women assume or are told that they are not making enough milk, and that if they don't supplement with formula or pumped milk, it might negatively affect the baby. So mom nurses the baby until she's out of milk, then stops nursing and gives the baby a bottle, while pumping. Then two primary things happen:

The baby loses interest in nursing, because bottles are easier, and being sated reduces/eliminates the desire to nurse for comfort.

Milk production decreases, because pumping is far less efficient than nursing and the body will adjust supply based on outflow.

(And if formula is added in, that compounds these factors further. Supplementing with formula most often ensures the continued need for formula.)

In most cases, if the mother had a wise woman at hand to help calm her rather than stoking her fears about her body being deficient or her baby "not gaining weight fast enough," she could simply resign herself to an intensive and probably frustrating period of nursing around the clock and almost never getting out of bed for a few days, and then things would be fine and baby would thrive.

Editing to add: I've seen some newer pumps that at least LOOK like they would do a better job of mimicking the mechanisms of nursing. But you can also make a cheap one go a LONG WAY by getting one with removable/replaceable flanges and making sure you're using the correct size of flange -- AND purchasing or rigging up a "hands-free pumping bra" to keep everything in place and free up your hands. Then you can relax (which is critical) and maybe distract yourself by doing something else, or if necessary you can augment the suction of the pump by applying methodical manual pressure to the milk ducts.
I totally agree with your whole post and would like to add that if a woman believes she is having supply issues, the last thing she should do is supplement (if the baby is otherwise healthy, that is). If there is a supply issue, more nursing is the answer not less. “Pump and dump” is a strategy to help build up supply as well as manual expression which helps to stimulate the breasts more effectively. Various herbs, like fenugreek, can help too.

The main thing, though, is that nursing is hard at first. Every baby is different and you’re essentially teaching your child their first skill. You’re teaching them how to eat.

Edit: On a side note, I believe the obesity epidemic is correlated with baby formula usage. Have you ever tried baby formula? Tastes absolutely disgusting. Babies are being trained from birth to prefer the chemical taste of formula and subsequently the same kinds of fake foods that are filled with preservatives, artificial flavorings, and plastic/sawdust fillers.
 
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Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
Thanks for this. And yes- I had read that the baby is supposed to lose weight and seem hungry. But they really put the pressure on and wouldn’t let me leave the hospital if I didn’t feed him the ready-to-feed with the fast flow nipple. Sigh…. Then there was my mother who never breast fed, of course, and thought I was just trying to overachieve or something at the expense of my baby. Baby had jaundice, was losing weight, etc…
That’s why “medicine” has no business in this. Being pregnant and giving birth and breastfeeding isn’t an illness or a “condition” or a “disability.” It is a process of Motherhood, of Womanhood. I wouldn’t trust any person to deliver my babies who hasn’t done it herself. Clinicalizing our natural reproduction (not just birthing but women’s reproductive health, in general) has been incredibly harmful to women and their progeny.
(Sorry if I come off as gruff but this issue fires me up.)
 

ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I just remembered one of the more important features that set the model I had apart from others:

Ability to adjust speed and strength of cycle and suction INDEPENDENTLY from one another.

The Medela I used had a range of "settings" that were supposed to be "all that," but in all cases speed and suction were directly correlated and you could not achieve a very long, slow, but FIRM "draw." Slow was always weak. That was very bad.
I agree. Im looking for a long draw pump this time. If I recall, that would’ve helped a lot with expression. Im currently researching the spectra pump. It seems like that one is pretty popular, but an inexpensive pump called Baby Bella is reported to do that type of suction very well also.
 

ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
That’s why “medicine” has no business in this. Being pregnant and giving birth and breastfeeding isn’t an illness or a “condition” or a “disability.” It is a process of Motherhood, of Womanhood. I wouldn’t trust any person to deliver my babies who hasn’t done it herself. Clinicalizing our natural reproduction (not just birthing but women’s reproductive health, in general) has been incredibly harmful to women and their progeny.
(Sorry if I come off as gruff but this issue fires me up.)
Agreed. I had a horrible hospital birth experience. It wasn’t just the nursing aspect. They forced me to give birth in a painful position that caused an injury that took a year to recover from.

I’m grateful to be “low risk” enough to use a midwife, but honestly if I wasn’t, there’s a good chance I’d just stay home and pray it goes okay. That’s how little trust I have in our medical system and how poorly they treated me. The sad thing is that there are so many women treated even worse than I was but they don’t even realize it. My sister was given a vertical c section because the baby wasn’t descending fast enough for the doctor to leave her shift and go home at 6pm. A vertical section should be an extreme last resort for a baby that is truly unable to pass through the pelvis for rare reasons.
Many women think it’s normal and even beneficial to be coerced and abused by hospital procedures. The fact that I knew that certain things they were doing were harmful to me or my baby, but that they were going to do them anyway for insurance or legalistic purposes really infuriated me and caused a lot of medical trauma that I still wrestle with and have carried into this pregnancy. The hard thing about pregnancy is that you sort of feel like you “have to” deal with doctors, for the baby’s sake, of course. I never go to the doctor in normal times. Everything Roosh writes about the medical profession is spot on, from experience.
 

Pray_Everyday

Sparrow
Woman
Other Christian
Hi everyone, I'm a long-term reader/lurker, but about this topic I believe I have some information that I'm hoping will be received with an open mind. I'm not so much trying to convince anyone who has posted to change their views, but hoping any other reader/ lurkers will see both sides of the issue...

I definitely agree that -at least in the U.S. - the process of birth and women's care in general is overmedicalized. Before having children I found myself very stressed about things such as being pressured into hep vaccines or eye ointment, but the hospital accepted our answer of "no" and did not pressure us further. For my first birth I was unprepared for their high pressure approach regarding other aspects of birth, and can definitely empathize with trauma related to procedures done on my body without my consent.

However, the whole midwife issue is one that I think needs to be approached with much discernment. After my first birth, my husband and I hired a midwife for the second one. While this woman advertised her services under the guise of a tailored-to--me experience, in reality she was pushing her own agenda. I'm not saying they're ALL like this, but we did many hours of research before hiring her and nowhere was I warned about these things.
Despite knowing that I was a Christian, she constantly promoted new-age, pagan or occult practices (yoga, meditation, affirmations, homeopathics, new age music, birth tarot cards, etc), and insinuated that she was involved in witchcraft. Even though I repeatedly told her I had no interest in giving birth in water she was extremely pushy about it, more pushy than the hospital had been about any of their things actually. She also kept pressuring for my husband and I to engage in activities which I won't mention out of decency in order to get the labor going, even though we believed that was immoral. I felt that my religious beliefs were not being respected, but it was too late to get our several thousand dollars fee back.

Also, unlike in some other countries, in the US, depending on the state, a midwife may have zero experience, zero education, and does not even have to disclose if anyone has died under her watch. The one we hired was licensed, but the licensing process is a joke (They get apprentice hours, but as I found out, sometimes the hours are fabricated). The "care" I received was negligent at best, and it's only because of our own proactive actions and the grace of God that the baby made it ok. My water was broken for two whole days at home and she would have had us continue waiting for labor to hopefully eventually start. She took advantage of the fact that I was very apprehensive about going to the hospital, and fearmongered me that if I went it would be to get an epidural or c section, both which I didn't want. My husband finally took action and took us to the hospital without informing her, and thanks to the mercy of God our son was born healthy. Also a piece of placenta broke off and got stuck inside me, so I would have possibly hemorrhaged to death if we hadn't been at the hospital. God truly was looking out for us and I thank him every day. (I had asked the midwife about the possibility of having a retained placenta since my ultrasound showed a placental lobe, and she had assured me that wouldn't happen. Just one more of her lies.)

I'm very skeptical of allopathic medicine, skeptical of vaccines even before this current mrna abomination, avoid going to the doctor unless absolutely necessary, etc. but I do believe that these midwives take advantage of people like us. There's blogs from women who have been shunned from the homebirth community for speaking out about their bad experiences - The midwife is never to blame, always the woman. They claim they're not really a health care professional, and all the decisions are your own (which is not entirely true given all their high pressure tactics). But if they aren't serving in the role of a health care professional, what are they getting paid for?

As for the original topic, I was at both Target and Costco this week and both had plenty of formula in stock.
 

Arby

Sparrow
Woman
Atheist
Hi everyone, I'm a long-term reader/lurker, but about this topic I believe I have some information that I'm hoping will be received with an open mind. I'm not so much trying to convince anyone who has posted to change their views, but hoping any other reader/ lurkers will see both sides of the issue...

I definitely agree that -at least in the U.S. - the process of birth and women's care in general is overmedicalized. Before having children I found myself very stressed about things such as being pressured into hep vaccines or eye ointment, but the hospital accepted our answer of "no" and did not pressure us further. For my first birth I was unprepared for their high pressure approach regarding other aspects of birth, and can definitely empathize with trauma related to procedures done on my body without my consent.

However, the whole midwife issue is one that I think needs to be approached with much discernment. After my first birth, my husband and I hired a midwife for the second one. While this woman advertised her services under the guise of a tailored-to--me experience, in reality she was pushing her own agenda. I'm not saying they're ALL like this, but we did many hours of research before hiring her and nowhere was I warned about these things.
Despite knowing that I was a Christian, she constantly promoted new-age, pagan or occult practices (yoga, meditation, affirmations, homeopathics, new age music, birth tarot cards, etc), and insinuated that she was involved in witchcraft. Even though I repeatedly told her I had no interest in giving birth in water she was extremely pushy about it, more pushy than the hospital had been about any of their things actually. She also kept pressuring for my husband and I to engage in activities which I won't mention out of decency in order to get the labor going, even though we believed that was immoral. I felt that my religious beliefs were not being respected, but it was too late to get our several thousand dollars fee back.

Also, unlike in some other countries, in the US, depending on the state, a midwife may have zero experience, zero education, and does not even have to disclose if anyone has died under her watch. The one we hired was licensed, but the licensing process is a joke (They get apprentice hours, but as I found out, sometimes the hours are fabricated). The "care" I received was negligent at best, and it's only because of our own proactive actions and the grace of God that the baby made it ok. My water was broken for two whole days at home and she would have had us continue waiting for labor to hopefully eventually start. She took advantage of the fact that I was very apprehensive about going to the hospital, and fearmongered me that if I went it would be to get an epidural or c section, both which I didn't want. My husband finally took action and took us to the hospital without informing her, and thanks to the mercy of God our son was born healthy. Also a piece of placenta broke off and got stuck inside me, so I would have possibly hemorrhaged to death if we hadn't been at the hospital. God truly was looking out for us and I thank him every day. (I had asked the midwife about the possibility of having a retained placenta since my ultrasound showed a placental lobe, and she had assured me that wouldn't happen. Just one more of her lies.)

I'm very skeptical of allopathic medicine, skeptical of vaccines even before this current mrna abomination, avoid going to the doctor unless absolutely necessary, etc. but I do believe that these midwives take advantage of people like us. There's blogs from women who have been shunned from the homebirth community for speaking out about their bad experiences - The midwife is never to blame, always the woman. They claim they're not really a health care professional, and all the decisions are your own (which is not entirely true given all their high pressure tactics). But if they aren't serving in the role of a health care professional, what are they getting paid for?

As for the original topic, I was at both Target and Costco this week and both had plenty of formula in stock.
Yes, that has been my experience also. Hospitals may be overly pushy, but midwives can be downright negligent. My birth went okay so no issues there, but when we had feeding troubles the midwife kept reassuring me that it was fine, my daughter was growing and doing great, was latching just fine etc.
Even when I weighed her and she weighed about 3oz LESS than at the pediatrician three or so weeks before, the midwife said I should just pump and let the cream of the pumped milk separate and then spoon feed the cream and we'll wait and see how she's doing in a week. Well, we went to the pediatrician next day and she confirmed my daughter was basically starving and we have to supplement immediately. Because at that point due to poor transfer my milk supply was wayy down. Had we listened to the midwife and waited for a week, she would probably have died or at least have lasting damage.
 

ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
The thing about midwives is that they are unregulated in a lot of places in the US and you do have to be careful. It is best to go with ones that are licensed nurses as well. What I like about my current practice is that they are licensed and experienced, really into informed consent and also explicitly Christian (which I wasn’t expecting to be honest). As for now, I appreciate not having to wear a mask when I go and not constantly being asked about a Covid vaccine. I do feel some midwifery practices are more open about their own beliefs ,which can be for better or worse, depending on what their beliefs are. Anyway, I haven’t gone through a full pregnancy and birth with them yet, so I don’t have a full review on my practice, but I do agree that we have to be cautious. The problem is there are many times when the hospital isn’t much better in a lot of cases. So who to trust? It’s kind of a major issue that we don’t have this figured out in the US. I hear European countries have better care for prenatal and delivery than we do, but I don’t know from experience if that’s true either.

Also- I won’t say what state I’m in, but it’s in the southeastern US and I am noticing a lack of formula on the shelves lately in the grocery store, especially certain brands like Similac. Enfamil seems okay. I also googled this the other day and got some interesting results. It seems that parents are having to hunt down specialized formula for babies that have digestive issues and lots of talk about switching formulas if one is hard to find. I hope it doesn’t get a whole lot worse, but I made this thread specifically to point out that it’s something to watch out for because it could get worse in coming months. I certainly hope that’s not the case.

To add- meat shelves are bare where I am, too. Not completely empty, but not the selection we’re used to.
 

Arby

Sparrow
Woman
Atheist
I hear European countries have better care for prenatal and delivery than we do, but I don’t know from experience if that’s true either.
Should've mentioned this in my post - I'm from Germany. There are only licensed midwives here and they're covered by insurance. The licensing process used to be a three year apprenticeship, I think now you can actually go to university for it as well. The midwives I had were both licensed, both had many years of experience and multiple kids of their own.
That said - I do believe in general prenatal care is much better here. C section rates are higher than they should be still, but every potential hospital I looked at when I was pregnant had it as their standard policy to intervene as little as possible, do skin-to-skin right after birth etc.
 

Pray_Everyday

Sparrow
Woman
Other Christian
Yes, that has been my experience also. Hospitals may be overly pushy, but midwives can be downright negligent. My birth went okay so no issues there, but when we had feeding troubles the midwife kept reassuring me that it was fine, my daughter was growing and doing great, was latching just fine etc.
Even when I weighed her and she weighed about 3oz LESS than at the pediatrician three or so weeks before, the midwife said I should just pump and let the cream of the pumped milk separate and then spoon feed the cream and we'll wait and see how she's doing in a week. Well, we went to the pediatrician next day and she confirmed my daughter was basically starving and we have to supplement immediately. Because at that point due to poor transfer my milk supply was wayy down. Had we listened to the midwife and waited for a week, she would probably have died or at least have lasting damage.
Wow that sounds like extreme negligence! Thank God your daughter is ok.
Edit: just saw your new post - this was with a university educated midwife?

The midwife I had hired told me she could take care of all well baby checkups for the first year. Like my husband said, "What are we paying for, wouldn't we be better off just not doing the checkups in that case and just asking the internet?"

In states where midwives are not regulated some of them seem to have a horrible sense of risk assessment. In my case, during the pregnancy the midwife seemed more concerned about whether I would risk out on paper than if it actually was safe to proceed. For example, she would ask me question like "Are you experiencing preeclampsia symptoms?" without describing what these symptoms would be or what the implications of developing preeclampsia could be. It seemed negligent to assume that the average woman would know what symptoms to look out for and self report. A possible symptom of preeclampsia is sudden weight gain but we were not checking my weight so how would we know...
Throughout the pregnancy I was monitoring my diet carefully and doing daily blood sugar accu-checks because I refused to do a gestational diabetes test but still wanted to make sure my numbers were fine. Since I was planning to give birth at home I needed to ensure the baby would not be born with elevated blood sugar levels that would then crash down without treatment and possibly cause brain damage. The midwife continually harassed me about the fact that I was checking my numbers and tried to pressure me to stop even though it was nothing to her. She stupidly said something about the pain of the finger sticks and my poor fingers and I'm thinking I'm signing up for one of the most painful experiences known to women and you're worried about the pain of picking my fingers?! But wait, that's because according to her agenda birth is actually not painful, it's actually fun and pleasurable (eyeroll).
 

Pray_Everyday

Sparrow
Woman
Other Christian
The thing about midwives is that they are unregulated in a lot of places in the US and you do have to be careful. It is best to go with ones that are licensed nurses as well. What I like about my current practice is that they are licensed and experienced, really into informed consent and also explicitly Christian (which I wasn’t expecting to be honest). As for now, I appreciate not having to wear a mask when I go and not constantly being asked about a Covid vaccine. I do feel some midwifery practices are more open about their own beliefs ,which can be for better or worse, depending on what their beliefs are. Anyway, I haven’t gone through a full pregnancy and birth with them yet, so I don’t have a full review on my practice, but I do agree that we have to be cautious. The problem is there are many times when the hospital isn’t much better in a lot of cases. So who to trust? It’s kind of a major issue that we don’t have this figured out in the US. I hear European countries have better care for prenatal and delivery than we do, but I don’t know from experience if that’s true either.

Also- I won’t say what state I’m in, but it’s in the southeastern US and I am noticing a lack of formula on the shelves lately in the grocery store, especially certain brands like Similac. Enfamil seems okay. I also googled this the other day and got some interesting results. It seems that parents are having to hunt down specialized formula for babies that have digestive issues and lots of talk about switching formulas if one is hard to find. I hope it doesn’t get a whole lot worse, but I made this thread specifically to point out that it’s something to watch out for because it could get worse in coming months. I certainly hope that’s not the case.

To add- meat shelves are bare where I am, too. Not completely empty, but not the selection we’re used to.
I agree that the ones that are licensed nurse midwives are generally much more qualified than direct entry midwives, licensed or not. Unfortunately in my state nurse midwives are only allowed to practice at a hospital in place of an OB, so for home births it's only the non-nurse kind with questionable credentials or education regardless of licensing.

That's great that your midwife practice is explicitly Christian as well. In my area I had the choice of overtly radicalized woke SJW types or more discreet about their beliefs. I knew for sure I didn't want to go with someone that referred to pregnant women as "birthing people" or kept going on about "racism" in birthing practice. At the time I thought it would be ok to enter into this business transaction with a non-Christian as long as she wasn't explicitly "woke", but I didn't know that the whole philosophy would be glorifying pagan cultures and practices (She kept giving me reading material that discussed how primitive pagan cultures were so much more advanced, and how our "shame" and western prudishness, aka modesty, had resulted in worsening of outcomes). This whole experience has definitely made me more aware of the perils of being yoked to unbelievers in any way.

Regarding hospitals, I would say that they're not all equal. For my first baby the only hospital that my insurance covered was terrible and I felt so disrespected and abused. Where we went after we decided to ditch the midwife was a private hospital and my experience was much better. Both places respected us declining the vaccines, but the private hospital also respected my body when I declined physical checks and interventions. It is such a shame that there is not a better standard of care at hospitals because the unqualified midwives really take advantage of vulnerable and abused women.
 

ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I agree that the ones that are licensed nurse midwives are generally much more qualified than direct entry midwives, licensed or not. Unfortunately in my state nurse midwives are only allowed to practice at a hospital in place of an OB, so for home births it's only the non-nurse kind with questionable credentials or education regardless of licensing.

That's great that your midwife practice is explicitly Christian as well. In my area I had the choice of overtly radicalized woke SJW types or more discreet about their beliefs. I knew for sure I didn't want to go with someone that referred to pregnant women as "birthing people" or kept going on about "racism" in birthing practice. At the time I thought it would be ok to enter into this business transaction with a non-Christian as long as she wasn't explicitly "woke", but I didn't know that the whole philosophy would be glorifying pagan cultures and practices (She kept giving me reading material that discussed how primitive pagan cultures were so much more advanced, and how our "shame" and western prudishness, aka modesty, had resulted in worsening of outcomes). This whole experience has definitely made me more aware of the perils of being yoked to unbelievers in any way.

Regarding hospitals, I would say that they're not all equal. For my first baby the only hospital that my insurance covered was terrible and I felt so disrespected and abused. Where we went after we decided to ditch the midwife was a private hospital and my experience was much better. Both places respected us declining the vaccines, but the private hospital also respected my body when I declined physical checks and interventions. It is such a shame that there is not a better standard of care at hospitals because the unqualified midwives really take advantage of vulnerable and abused women.
Wow- yeah there is a sort of “woo woo” aspect to some alternative medicines. Or at least those types of people are attracted to alternative medicine. That’s something I have noticed. I’m glad that you found a good hospital. I wouldn’t mind a hospital birth if it was a place I could trust that would allow me to labor and only intervene if necessary.

Unfortunately, our medical system in the US basically forces us to choose between 2 extremes: A hospital birth where you are hooked up to every possible restrictive wire/monitor possible so that they can bill your insurance for each and every one. Or, God forbid, they forgot a wire and so they are terrified you might sue…. Forced into birthing in a natural and uncomfortable way because when you need stitches, they can charge insurance, epidural pushed so they can charge insurance, etc…. OR witch doctor. It seems to take luck and/or research to find a somewhat happy medium. I really hope this changes.
 

Alexander_English

 
Banned
Protestant
Hello Friends.
I’m currently 19 weeks pregnant and my hormones and fears are sort of in overdrive right now. I’ll just come right out and say it- I’m terrified of a formula shortage since I’ve heard rumors of one coming (and there already being scarcities in some areas).
Can someone put this into perspective for me?

Now- my plan is 100% to try and exclusively breastfeed, but this is my 2nd child and I had milk supply issues with my first. I absolutely had to supplement with formula or he would have starved. I do have reason to believe that things will be better this time and that the original issue has been resolved, but I’m still nervous.

Does anyone know anything about this or know of alternative ways to feed babies if the worst case scenario happens? I remember this elderly black woman telling me how she fed her babies with a carnation milk based formula once. She lived in my building and I was crying about not being able to breastfeed my son and she told me about that. I kind of dismissed it at the time, but now Im thinking that may be handy to know.

The mother of my children told me yesterday about this issue, as she is feeding formula to our 2.5 month old son and dealing with the shortages. She belongs to a Facebook group of local moms, and apparently some of the moms who produce more breast milk than they need are donating it to others who don't have enough milk, and are unable to get formula. You may want to try and find a local group like that.

This group also told her about a formula recall for Similac Alimentum powder, which explained why our son suddenly became violently ill 4 days ago. So I thank God for this group, otherwise she might have fed him all 10 large cans she had bought before realizing they were contaminated with salmonella. Digestive issues run in the family so we might not have known it was due to the formula.

Edit: This post exposes quite a few bad facts about my life, but I am not one to pretend I am not a sinner. Just trying to pass along some helpful information. I hope it helps.
 
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Atlas Shrugged

Woodpecker
Woman
Protestant
I’m a huge breastfeeding advocate and back in the day there were wet nurses. If I could not feed my baby I would still want breast milk. I adored breastfeeding. But then again I notice many many people think breastfeeding is gross while guzzling cows breast milk. That’s a head scratcher. I would try and find wet nurses. I don’t know what else to say if there is a formula shortage. That is scary for women who depend on it. I pray every women who needs it gets it but in the meantime keep looking for women that will share their surplus milk. It’s easy for some to have a surplus. When I officially weaned my son my freezer was packed, so he continued to have breast milk for a while.
 
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