Baby Formula Shortage…?

ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I know nothing about feeding babies but, let's say, 200 years ago there was no such thing as a baby formula. How did people feed their babies then? Instead of focusing on such shortage we should go back to the old ways.
While I agree with this completely and I think ultimately this will have to happen, there will unfortunately be a painful transition period before people become more self reliant again. It looks like the transition period is starting now and I feel awful for those that are unprepared. Also- the prevalence of “food sensitivity issues” in infants and children today compared with kids of the past is super high and there are special formula brands out there for those situations. My speculation is GMOs and vaccines are contributing to all these special cases nowadays. There is going to have to be a whole shift in how we do things for sure.
 

ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
Considering how I always heard about Big Pharma and the formula industry, I was surprised. I'm admittedly a conspiracy researcher kind of person, but I found it super weird that these same people who kept trying to insist that I get vaccinated (pre-covid and after) and take unnecessary medications would be suddenly want me to not rely on Big Pharma. Also interesting that the first hospital (which was in a "diverse" demographics area) was about 5x more pushy than the private hospital in a nice area. If I didn't know any better I would say disgenics are involved...

I noticed this as well. On one hand, breastfeeding is just common sense- it’s natural and it’s the way God intended for babies to be fed. On the other hand, why does the mainstream push it to the point where you are made to feel lesser if you are unable to or can’t for whatever reason? As much as I think breastfeeding is great and would encourage every woman to at least try it, it can’t help but feel like it’s being pushed both by the media and regular people to be just another standard that you must meet as a woman or else you are somehow inferior or not good enough. It used to be beauty standards that made you feel that way although those have somewhat eased off since everyone promoted is ugly or trans now. There’s also a lot of other mothering trends designed to make women feel this way as well.

Since I mistrust everything that the mainstream pushes because they usually push inversions, I’ve noticed this discrepancy as well, and have been wondering why it exists or what it means. Dysgenics makes sense, unfortunately. I’ve also thought this in regards to this formula shortage. It also adds up that the babies with food sensitivities and allergies (as I mentioned in a post above) are going to suffer the most for this shortage. Healthy mothers will breast feed and their babies, if also healthy, will take the milk. If a mother can’t or won’t breast feed, then a healthy baby will take goats milk or some other random brand. It’s a baby who has a particular allergy or sensitivity that won’t get their needs met.

ETA since I have more to say on this- Formula has been the dominate method for feeding babies in the US for 60ish years now. With rare exceptions, our mothers and grandmothers did not breastfeed. “Big formula” marketed itself so well as to make generations of women become completely reliant on it. Now the rug is being pulled out and many women do not have the support and encouragement needed to breast feed. With my first, I was trying to breastfeed an infant, but I had never in my life seen it done by anyone else. My own mother was concerned I was starving him because her solution was to dump bottles down my throat when I was a baby. Easy and sure. The women who tend to succeed the most at breastfeeding are those who research, study, educate themselves on the topic, etc… it’s a personality type. I have it and most here do, too, but we are not the norm. When it comes to something as natural and necessary as feeding babies, most people are going to default to what they know or what their own mothers did. If you aren’t the type to do your research and read breastfeeding books, etc.. then you will be less successful. But that isn’t the way nature intended for us to be able to learn this skill.
 
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Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
I noticed this as well. On one hand, breastfeeding is just common sense- it’s natural and it’s the way God intended for babies to be fed. On the other hand, why does the mainstream push it to the point where you are made to feel lesser if you are unable to or can’t for whatever reason? As much as I think breastfeeding is great and would encourage every woman to at least try it, it can’t help but feel like it’s being pushed both by the media and regular people to be just another standard that you must meet as a woman or else you are somehow inferior or not good enough. It used to be beauty standards that made you feel that way although those have somewhat eased off since everyone promoted is ugly or trans now. There’s also a lot of other mothering trends designed to make women feel this way as well.

Since I mistrust everything that the mainstream pushes because they usually push inversions, I’ve noticed this discrepancy as well, and have been wondering why it exists or what it means.

When industrialization happened women went to work in factories and their milk supplies started drying up, so synthetic formula started appearing on the market and doctors ended up backing it, rather reluctantly.


Also Nestle got in trouble for pushing formula in impoverished areas as superior to breastmilk (better than natural-- where have we heard that?), so most formula companies can't make any insane claims.
 
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Pray_Everyday

Sparrow
Woman
Other Christian
I noticed this as well. On one hand, breastfeeding is just common sense- it’s natural and it’s the way God intended for babies to be fed. On the other hand, why does the mainstream push it to the point where you are made to feel lesser if you are unable to or can’t for whatever reason? As much as I think breastfeeding is great and would encourage every woman to at least try it, it can’t help but feel like it’s being pushed both by the media and regular people to be just another standard that you must meet as a woman or else you are somehow inferior or not good enough. It used to be beauty standards that made you feel that way although those have somewhat eased off since everyone promoted is ugly or trans now. There’s also a lot of other mothering trends designed to make women feel this way as well.

Since I mistrust everything that the mainstream pushes because they usually push inversions, I’ve noticed this discrepancy as well, and have been wondering why it exists or what it means. Dysgenics makes sense, unfortunately.
Definitely agree.

As my husband and I say, any time both sides of the mainstream establishment (conservative and liberal) are pushing the same ideas, something's up.

The women who tend to succeed the most at breastfeeding are those who research, study, educate themselves on the topic, etc… it’s a personality type. I have it and most here do, too, but we are not the norm. When it comes to something as natural and necessary as feeding babies, most people are going to default to what they know or what their own mothers did. If you aren’t the type to do your research and read breastfeeding books, etc.. then you will be less successful. But that isn’t the way nature intended for us to be able to learn this skill.
Yea, I was one of those formula only fed babies too.

Unfortunately, most of the stuff I found while researching (forums and most books) just focused on making the women who can't do it feel guilty and inadequate, and pushing the "breast is best" slogan (and then I found a site called fed is best that focused on the starving babies of women who didn't make enough milk and it terrified me).

It wasn't until I came across the book I mentioned earlier in the thread that anyone mentioned the quality of the mom's diet. Based on logic alone I had the idea that the nutrients must be present in the woman's body in order to be passed to the baby, but the doctor and nurses who I saw for prenatal care that kept insisting on breastfeeding never once mentioned anything about my nutrition.

Just clarifying, I am certainly pro-breastfeeding, I just wish women were given accurate information about the importance of consuming a high nutrient diet during and after the preganancy and not just relying on the synthetic prenatal vitamins (which, incidentally, the nurses told me to stop taking as soon as the baby was born). I'm sure the women who had their babies get injured because of this would have liked to know it was a possibility and how they could prevent it. And women who underproduce or dry up prematurely don't need to be shamed and blamed because sometimes these things are out of our control.

When industrialization happened women went to work in factories and their milk supplies started drying up, so synthetic formula started appearing on the market and doctors ended up backing it, rather reluctantly.


Also Nestle got in trouble for pushing formula in impoverished areas as superior to breastmilk (better than natural-- where have we heard that?), so most formula companies can't make any insane claims.
Interesting article. It's really sad about the babies of the poor women that had to go into wet nursing. Things like that show that formula can be a blessing to some.

It was so refreshing to read an article that accurately refers to women as "women", not birthing people or such nonsense.
 

Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
Just clarifying, I am certainly pro-breastfeeding, I just wish women were given accurate information about the importance of consuming a high nutrient diet during and after the preganancy and not just relying on the synthetic prenatal vitamins (which, incidentally, the nurses told me to stop taking as soon as the baby was born).

Why would they tell you to stop taking vitamins?
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
I wonder if this has anything to do with the shortages:

Apparently Gates and Zuckerberg, among others, invested $3.5 million in 2020 for creating artificial breastmilk produced from human mammary cells.


From the article:
A new and better breast milk alternative has arrived, and it claims to be helpful for the environment as well. The U.S. firm, BIOMILQ, is artificially producing human breast milk from cultured human mammary epithelial cells to be commercially available to consumers.

The start-up company has received $3.5 million from an investment fund that is co-founded by Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, and Mark Zuckerberg. The fund was established to help prevent the ill effects of climate change brought about by carbon emissions.
The approach used in manufacturing artificial breast milk is by replicating the key proteins found in human breast milk. Harvesting cells from human mammary cells, the artificial breast milk presents proteins found in regular breast milk that would contain more health benefits compared to cow's milk or a soy-based formula.
 

Pray_Everyday

Sparrow
Woman
Other Christian
Why would they tell you to stop taking vitamins?
The only answer I can think of is my conspiracy theory, nothing else makes sense to me. I ignored them and continued taking them anyway.

To be clear, I'm not saying the individual nurses mean anyone harm -- it's what they have been told to say by higher ups, and when I asked why they just said I don't need them anymore. But they said to stop taking them, not that it was optional.

That hospital (and many others, but not all) was part of this Baby Friendly Initiative program and I think they get most of their guidelines, and literature, directly from them.


I wonder if this has anything to do with the shortages:

Apparently Gates and Zuckerberg, among others, invested $3.5 million in 2020 for creating artificial breastmilk produced from human mammary cells.


This bothers me.

I don't know if it makes me a big hypocrite, but I would have a huge problem feeding my child this, but not "traditional" formula if necessary. Something about bioengineering is just plain wrong to me. Even back when I was a dumb atheist I had a sense that tinkering with DNA at the molecular level is something you just don't do. Back then I wouldn't have referred to it as "playing God" but that's exactly what it is. And every time something is funded by Gates and claims to "fight climate change" you know they're looking out for our best interests - not.

In a way I have bioengineering to thank for me eventually coming to Christ because it was my horror at finding out what was in the food supply that led me down the conspiracy rabbit hole and eventually to God.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I know nothing about feeding babies but, let's say, 200 years ago there was no such thing as a baby formula. How did people feed their babies then? Instead of focusing on such shortage we should go back to the old ways.
Infant mortality was also way higher, so a direct comparison is hard to make.
 

Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
The only answer I can think of is my conspiracy theory, nothing else makes sense to me. I ignored them and continued taking them anyway.

To be clear, I'm not saying the individual nurses mean anyone harm -- it's what they have been told to say by higher ups, and when I asked why they just said I don't need them anymore. But they said to stop taking them, not that it was optional.

That hospital (and many others, but not all) was part of this Baby Friendly Initiative program and I think they get most of their guidelines, and literature, directly from them.

Did they mean to stop taking prenatals and start taking something else? That was one of the first things they asked me at my follow-up.

I was at a baby friendly hospital too and had a fairly good experience, although the lactation consultants were kind of annoying ("make your breast into a sandwich" WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN, why can't you just say "flatten") and every hour there's a different nurse saying "hi honey :) we need to check your tear"

I took regular multivitamins in my last pregnancy b/c they're half the price and have basically the same ingredients and the doctor was like "that's fine, you just need the folic acid."


Maybe. Create shortage --> here's the solution!
 

Pray_Everyday

Sparrow
Woman
Other Christian
Did they mean to stop taking prenatals and start taking something else? That was one of the first things they asked me at my follow-up.
That could have been what they meant, but if so they sure had bad communication skills. I asked 'should I take a different one?' and they said no. But I still had a full bottle so I kept taking them, which was good because I was pregnant again before my daughter was weaned.

It was right after delivery, I didn't bother going to my follow up...

I was at a baby friendly hospital too and had a fairly good experience, although the lactation consultants were kind of annoying ("make your breast into a sandwich" WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN, why can't you just say "flatten") and every hour there's a different nurse saying "hi honey :) we need to check your tear"

I took regular multivitamins in my last pregnancy b/c they're half the price and have basically the same ingredients and the doctor was like "that's fine, you just need the folic acid."
Lol, they probably have never gotten a good response from telling a woman to flatten her breast.

The only good thing I have to say about my experience at the baby friendly hospital was that at least they respected when I was feeding my daughter and came back later to do things like hearing test and other assessments instead of insisting it had to be done right now. Other than that, 0/5 stars do not recommend.

The other hospital was more woman friendly but kept making me unlatch my son because that's when it was convenient for the pediatrician to examine him. And they didn't want to let me feed him as he got his heel stick test or other blood draws but I put my foot down and they finally relented.

Maybe. Create shortage --> here's the solution!
This is a horrible development in the story.
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
Maybe. Create shortage --> here's the solution!

From The Babylon Bee...

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budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
I wonder if this has anything to do with the shortages:

Apparently Gates and Zuckerberg, among others, invested $3.5 million in 2020 for creating artificial breastmilk produced from human mammary cells.


Below video is BIOMILQ's startup pitch (January 7, 2021).




CNN Business recently (May 3, 2022) wrote an article about BIOMILQ.

Lab-grown 'human milk' may be just three years away​

Breast milk is the perfect food for babies but not all mothers are able to breastfeed, and with adoption or surrogacy, parents don't have the option.

Enter: BIOMILQ. The North Carolina-based startup is working to create "human milk" outside of the body.

From burgers to breasts

The idea first came to co-founder and chief science officer Leila Strickland in 2013, after she heard about the world's first lab-grown burger. A cell biologist by training, Strickland wondered if similar technology could be used to culture human milk-producing cells, she tells CNN Business.

Strickland had struggled to produce enough breast milk for her first child. "A lot of women are grappling with this," she says.

Globally, only one in three babies receives as much breast milk in their first six months as experts recommend, says the World Health Organization. Instead, many parents rely on formula. The milk formula industry was worth over $52 billion in 2021, according to market research provider Euromonitor International.

Often based on powdered cow's milk, formula is "able to satisfy a lot of the nutritional requirements," Strickland says, but it cannot replicate "the complexity of human milk." Strickland says BIOMILQ's product, by comparison, better matches the nutritional profile of breast milk than formula, with more similar proportions of proteins, carbohydrates and fats.

The BIOMILQ team creates its product from cells taken from human breast tissue and milk, donated by women in the local community, who get a Target giftcard in return. BIOMILQ grows the cells in flasks, feeding them nutrients, and then incubates them in a bioreactor that mimics the environment in a breast. Here, the cells absorb more nutrients and secrete milk components


BIOMILQ is still three to five years off from getting a product to market, Strickland says. First, the startup needs to grow mammary cells at a much larger scale — and at a lower cost. BIOMILQ also needs to convince regulators that the product is safe for babies, a task that is especially challenging for a new food category like lab-grown human milk products.

"There isn't really a regulatory framework that exists," Strickland says.

No magic formula

Even if BIOMILQ gets that far, human milk that comes from a bioreactor won't have exactly the same health benefits as milk that comes from a breast, according to Natalie Shenker, a fellow at Imperial College London and co-founder of the Human Milk Foundation, which helps provide donor milk to families that need it.
Fatty acids, which help brain development and growth, and hormones such as cortisol, which helps develop the baby's sleep cycle, come from the mother's blood, says Shenker.

Lactation consultant Courtney Miller, who supports breastfeeding mothers, agrees that cell-cultured milk is not a "replacement for breast milk." But she thinks it could offer parents "another choice," particularly when adoption or surrogacy is involved.

"Formula right now is their only option, unless they are able to do breast milk donation," Miller says. Accessing donor milk can be difficult. In the United States, feeding a newborn with breast milk from a milk bank can cost up to $100 per day. Finding a donor online is often cheaper, but can come with safety concerns.
Miller also believes BIOMILQ can further the scientific study of breast milk. She has donated a few ounces of her own milk to the startup, in the hopes that its research can lead to new breakthroughs in infant nutrition.

A growth industry

BIOMILQ is not the only company hoping to create a new kind of milk for babies. Turtle Tree, based in Singapore and the United States, is culturing stem cells to create milk components from a range of mammals, including humans, while New York-based Helaina is using microbial fermentation to grow proteins found in human milk.

By taking dairy farming out of the equation, BIOMILQ says its product could make feeding babies more environmentally sustainable. Producing one kilogram of packaged formula creates between seven and 11 kilograms of carbon dioxide, according to one estimate. BIOMILQ is still running studies into its own carbon footprint.

The promise of a greener alternative to formula has attracted investment from Bill Gates' Breakthrough Energy Ventures. Alongside other investors, the climate-focused fund helped BIOMILQ raise $21 million in October 2021. With this funding, Strickland says BIOMILQ is focused on expanding, and making more milk. "We consider ourselves now in our second trimester," she says.


Unrelated to BIOMILQ, but related to Bill Gates...back in February of 2020, he donated money to a Canadian university's breast milk research group.

University of Manitoba researcher granted $6.5M to study breast milk​

A University of Manitoba researcher has been awarded $6.5 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to create a new global health initiative focused on breast milk.

The grant will help establish the International Milk Composition Consortium, a group that will analyze the components of breast milk connected to infant growth and resilience.

The goal of the research is to help inform maternal and infant nutrition recommendations and interventions. It will also shed light on why some breastfed infants develop infections, and will help optimize nutrition for babies who can’t be breastfed.

According to a news release from the U of M, the nutritional and non-nutritional components of breastfeeding vary between women and little is known about these variations.

“Breast milk is fascinating,” said Dr. Meghan Azad, a U of M assistant professor, in the release.

“It is so fundamentally important to infant health, and yet we know surprisingly little about breast milk composition and its variation around the world. This project will help us learn about how human milk helps human babies develop and grow up healthy.”

The consortium will combine research groups from Tanzania, Pakistan, Nepal, Burkina Faso and Canada. It will also include human milk scientists and data scientists.

Researchers will work with 1200 mother-infant pairs to begin with.


Edit. The Baby Formula Shortage is a distraction to keep everyone's attention away from the real issue like the article below.

Bridle said the discovery of vaccine-induced spike protein in blood circulation would have implications for blood donation programs. “We don’t want transfer of these pathogenic spike proteins to fragile patients who are being transfused with that blood,” he said.

The vaccine scientist also said the findings suggested that nursing babies whose mothers had been vaccinated were at risk of getting COVID spike proteins from her breast milk.

Bridle said that “any proteins in the blood will get concentrated in breast milk,” and “we have found evidence of suckling infants experiencing bleeding disorders in the gastrointestinal tract” in VAERS.

Although Bridle did not cite it, one VAERS report describes a five-month-old breastfed infant whose mother received a second dose of Pfizer’s vaccine in March. The following day, the baby developed a rash and became “inconsolable,” refused to nurse, and developed a fever. The report says the baby was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, a rare blood disorder in which blood clots form in small blood vessels throughout the body. The baby died.

Given the small number of young research subjects in Pfizer’s vaccine trials and the limited duration of clinical trials, the CCCA said questions about the spike protein and another vaccine protein must be answered before children and teens are vaccinated, including whether the vaccine spike protein crosses the blood-brain barrier, whether the vaccine spike protein interferes with semen production or ovulation, and whether the vaccine spike protein crosses the placenta and impacts a developing baby or is in breast milk.
 
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Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
That could have been what they meant, but if so they sure had bad communication skills. I asked 'should I take a different one?' and they said no. But I still had a full bottle so I kept taking them, which was good because I was pregnant again before my daughter was weaned.

Yeah, I just find it strange that they would say that. Then again, I had a pediatrician who thought my son had torticollis (he doesn't) because sometimes he holds his head to the side.

My grandma and great-grandma had a saying, "Go to the doctor, see what they have to say, tell them they're full of sh**, then treat yourself!" So I try to respect our familial traditions. :)
 
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Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
Maybe. Create shortage --> here's the solution!
That’s exactly what I was thinking. Add to that some vaccinated mother’s milk seems toxic… Gates will swoop in with his “miracle milk” and save all the starving babies. It’s all so predictable and tiresome.

Eta: It also makes me think this is another step in the destruction of the family. Removing women further yet from motherhood. All they need to perfect is the artificial womb.
 
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ChristFollower1111

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
Oh boy- I would trust the Carnation canned evaporated milk before Gates and Zuckerberg created “Biomilq”. Well- this makes more sense now that I see this development has taken place. They have created zombie/robot milk to solve the current problem. The best part is that the women who donated tissues and cells to this study received a Target gift card. Yeah—- I’m speechless all around right now. I can’t even…..
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
My grandma and great-grandma had a saying, "Go to the doctor, see what they have to say, tell them they're full of sh**, then treat yourself!" So I try to respect our familial traditions. :)
Whenever my elderly mother goes to a doctor or hospital due to a serious illness, she will call them out - i.e., "You sucks at your job; you don't know what you are doing/talking about." - if they can't figure out why she's sick (i.e., extreme stomach pains).

Edit.

 

Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
Oh boy- I would trust the Carnation canned evaporated milk before Gates and Zuckerberg created “Biomilq”. Well- this makes more sense now that I see this development has taken place. They have created zombie/robot milk to solve the current problem. The best part is that the women who donated tissues and cells to this study received a Target gift card. Yeah—- I’m speechless all around right now. I can’t even…..

Thank you for the biological material, here's $5 to Dunkin'
 
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