Battlestar Galactica and masculinity

Max Roscoe

Kingfisher
I love sci fi and was a fan of the BSG remake, and am now re-watching it from a Christian perspective, as it has a strong God theme.
I came across an article from the original Starbuck that is definitely worth a read. Apologies, it is from Boomerbart:


There was a time, I know I was there, when men were men, women were women and sometimes a cigar was just a good smoke. But 40 years of feminism have taken their toll. The war against masculinity has been won. Everything has turned into its opposite, so that what was once flirting and smoking is now sexual harassment and criminal. And everyone is more lonely and miserable as a result.
Witness the “re-imagined” “Battlestar Galactica,” bleak, miserable, despairing, angry and confused. Which is to say, it reflects in microcosm the complete change in the politics and morality of today’s world, as opposed to the world of yesterday. One thing is certain. In the new un-imagined, re-imagined world of “Battlestar Galactica” everything is female driven. The male characters, from Adama on down, are confused, weak and wracked with indecision, while the female characters are decisive, bold, angry as hell, puffing cigars (gasp!) and not about to take it any more.

I remember Dirk from the original BSG, and as Faceman from the A-team. He has a point with the feminizing of the storyline and the changing of the script, but I didn't really see a problem with it. The crew and most of the strong characters are men, which is to be expected, but there are one or two exceptional women (Starbuck, and the hot asian chick Boomer) who are good fighter pilots. It's not like it portrays "all men and women are equal" but instead "we are in desperate times and there is one really good female fighter pilot."

Adama is perhaps the most singularly badass masculine figure in modern TV that I can remember. Yeah, the president is WAY too cocky for some teacher who suddenly became civilian president by default. But Adama never lets her overstep her bounds and checks her regularly. Is a female Starbuck realistic? Maybe not, but it was an interesting twist on the original instead of just filming the same exact story with newer actors and better CGI and it didn't bother me too much.

That said, it sure seems like Dirk was on the money. Over a decade ago, he called the insane feminized culture that we have become. And I suppose I can't think of any sweet, feminine characters in the film, though, I mean, the whole series is about war and survival of humanity in an extremely precarious situation so it's not really expected either.

I never really cared for the plotline of allying with the Cylons. It does seem a little crazy to trust a group who murdered billions and almost destroyed humanity. And I remember not liking the ending at all. I'll have to revisit those thoughts on the rewatch, but if nothing else it's an excellent series and a very different take on AI (AI that can feel emotions and even believe in God!). Any thoughts on the article, or the series in general are welcome. I do wonder if perhaps there was a bit of sour grapes. It looks like the article was written near the end of the series, and the original Apollo made a cameo appearance and maybe Starbuck tried and was rejected?

And here's a clip of Adama at his best--just watched this episode. The masculine ideal is strong but calm, forceful but caring, authoritative but subtle. Edward James Olmos nails it every time.

 
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