Clergy & Monastics Becoming a monk

Aleksandar

 
Banned
Other Christian
It's time for me to open my first thread, and I decided that it should be related to the main purpose of the forum, and that's discussion and education about Orthodox Christianity.

My questions are: have you considered or still considering becoming a monk? If yes, why? What do you expect from monkhood that you wouldn't be able to achieve in regular life? What would be the biggest difficulties/challenges if you became a monk?

Since I'm asking the questions, I will answer first.

I have thought about monkhood many, many times and still do. I'm considering it, since I think that a person that has their spiritual development, following the Path of Christ, and not married, can't find a better way to fully focus on his Salvation. You live your every hour focusing on the Path, there's nothing but it. You live a disciplined life of love for God and your fellow man, perform manual labor that benefits the brotherhood, you have your peace to focus fully on stripping your flaws with God's help, so you can help others. There are also many monks now who make video sermons, communicate with the Faithful trough e-mail, so it's also a great platform to help others, people still respect and trust monks.

When you're in the world, there are so many distractions, you have to work at least 40 hours per week, mostly in a job that you don't like, which is soft slavery, you have to associate with your work colleagues that are completely materialistic and unconscious and can rarely be helped. If you have secular friends, you will be forced to listen to and participate in stupid conversations (compared to your goal) and might be tempted to get involved in them, losing your peace. If you want to find a girl to get married, it's incredibly difficult, you have to play a role, be a clown, prove your manhood etc., it's simply not worth it for me at least and can cause a person to stray from the path and lose precious years, we don't have too much time. I won't even talk about the global conditions of the world we live in...

After saying all that about life in the world, I'd say that the most difficulties would stem from separation of beneficial worldly things. You wouldn't be able to spend time with your family/parents, friends, most of the hobbies, such as playing an instrument or sports are not possible anymore. You have a lifelong pledge and we all know how all of us are weak, we all fall sometimes, so it would be an incredibly hard thing for even the strongest of us.

My biggest difficulty would be some theological disagreements, which I won't write here since it's private. Second thing would be the inability to investigate other religions and spiritual practices, philosophies, since it's not appreciated and looked down upon. I'm a man who likes to explore, talk and learn about many different things. It's also a big challenge to find a brotherhood where you fit in, especially if you're very well educated and an erudite, since most monks in my country become monks very early and don't have too much life experience outside monkhood. You have to live together for the rest of your life in many cases, so you have to choose well. I don't know if you're familiar with it, but there are frequent conflicts between brothers, especially young, many leave the monasteries and go to a different one, or leave monkhood. I'm not sure about the %, but many monks leave monkhood, at least in my country, that has centuries of Monastic tradition.

I'd like to know your thoughts, opinions and experiences.

God bless
 

Penitent

Woodpecker
Orthodox
It sounds like you are considering monasticism before committing to the church, since you have doubts concerning theology. It’s fine if monasticism is what is drawing you to the church, but you have to believe with your whole heart first. I considered monasticism for many long years. Everyone should at least give it consideration. They say when you are searching for a monastery to join you are really searching for a spiritual father. When you begin to have a feeling almost like falling in love with the spiritual father of the monastery, then you know you have found the place of your repentance.
 

NickK

 
Banned
Orthodox
My biggest difficulty would be some theological disagreements, which I won't write here since it's private. Second thing would be the inability to investigate other religions and spiritual practices, philosophies, since it's not appreciated and looked down upon. I'm a man who likes to explore, talk and learn about many different things.

I'd like to know your thoughts, opinions and experiences.

God bless
Pursuing monasticism in Orthodoxy prerequisites the full acceptance of Orthodox theology and the complete abandonment of all other worldviews.

It seems that you 'd be more suited for Latin monasticism. They have no problem exploring zen budhism or offering incense to pagan deities.
 

Liviu

Sparrow
Orthodox
My questions are: have you considered or still considering becoming a monk? If yes, why? What do you expect from monkhood that you wouldn't be able to achieve in regular life? What would be the biggest difficulties/challenges if you became a monk?

I did considered to become a monk but more from a spiritual temporar necessity. Monkhood is not so much a choice, IS MAINLY A CALL.

Matthew 19 : 9 - 11

9 And I say unto you, Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for fornication, and shall marry another, committeth adultery: and whoso marrieth her which is put away doth commit adultery.

10 His disciples say unto him, If the case of the man be so with his wife, it is not good to marry.

11 But he said unto them, All men cannot receive this saying, save they to whom it is given.

Romanian spiritual father Arsenie Papacioc said to someone asking this kind of question (if to become monk) : `Did come the fire? ` (meaning in the heart)

Mastering the passion of the body requires VOCATION FOR IT. Saint Paisios the athonite (1924 - 1994) said that from all the people he met in his life (and he met probably tenths of thousands of Christians including monks, priests and bishops) the highest degree of non-passioning (purity of the heart regarding bodily attraction) was of 75%. Probably said that to us in order to say what Christians know from the holy fathers` writings and from the Church experience that even monks have to fight with the passions of the body. Probbaly a monk/none has over 50% (in terms of father Paisios) non-passioning and thus can resist without woman/man.
 

Liviu

Sparrow
Orthodox
I forgot to say. The votes for monkhood are three: poverty, chastity (or abstinence) and obedience

Even if someone could live in poverty because he has spiritul richness will encounter the passions of the body as I wrote above.

But if has the call for poverty and chastity (or abstinence) will encounter the hardest vote of all : obedience

Romania, with about 79% Christian-orthodox from under 20 million people has about 5 000 monks (or novices) and 20 000 nones(or novices). If we consider the population suitable to become monk from 20 to 60 years old I think the calculus would show that only 1 orthodox from 500 has the vocation for monkhood. And this is one the highest ratios in the Christian-orthodox world if not the highest.
 

Aleksandar

 
Banned
Other Christian
I appreciate all the advice, I know you guys have good intentions.

I made this thread in order for others to share their experiences, not to get advice about what's Orthodoxy, rules of monasticism etc., since I have no problems in that area, I was born and raised in an Orthodox Christian country, baptized by my own wish and have plenty of knowledge, theoretical and experiential (which is the only one that matters in the end). While I'm always open to learn and experience more, but I don't need help with the basics. I wanted to hear the experiences of others.

As for the Latin monasticism comment, I hope you didn't mean to insult me brother, even if you did, I forgive you. My country was on the receiving end of Roman Church sponsored genocide. I also consider the Roman (Jesuit) Church the topmost organization in the circle of evil. Not all Catholics, but the institution based in Vatican.

I don't light incense for pagan deities, as for exploring Zen Buddhism, I see no issues with it. I personally explored (definition of the word is: inquire into or discuss (a subject) in detail) various denominations of Christianity, Sanatana Dharma (or what people call Hinduism, I focused on Yoga, which predates it), Theravada and Zen Buddhism, Kabbalah, Tarot, Astrology, Hermeticism, various occult philosophies and secret societies, even Western 'magick'. I also explored various forms of satanism, communism, Marxism, Zionism etc., since I have to know what I'm against, to understand their motivations, beliefs and goals.

I explored these paths, in order to understand them from first hand, since I don't want to purely rely on someone else doing the work for me, while I was blessed by God with the intelligence, proper discernment and time to do so myself.

Many of them proved worthwhile for me and made me understand Christ better, especially Yoga, and I deem some of the Yogic practices a staple of my daily spiritual routine. For example, if I didn't have a serious Yogic practice, I would never come back to seriously study Christianity. Most people know absolutely nothing about Yoga, real Yoga doesn't have anything to do with various deities etc., I'll keep it at that. I consider myself a Christian Yogi, and I know what Fr. Seraphim Rose wrote about that...

As for my commitment to the Church, it's not there because of those theological differences and I consider it immoral to be a part of Church life and Liturgy, while not accepting some of the dogmas. I won't keep you in doubts what's it about: I have different views about the nature of God (Trinity), nature of Christ, immaculate conception. Those are the major ones, which bar me from participating, since I won't lie. What I believe can be read in the book of Bernadette Roberts called "The Real Christ", at least regarding the Trinity and nature of Christ. These are not simply intellectual, theoretical disagreements, but experiential. It's past belief.

I spoke to an Archimandrite about these things, world-renown Orthodox theologian and his words made me contemplate and reconsider my beliefs, but I concluded that they're the closest to Truth to me. He told me that those problems I encounter were encountered by the Church Fathers centuries ago and were never fully, 100% been resolved.

We tend to forget many things about Lord Jesus Christ's life. He was considered the arch-heretic in the religion he was born in, because he had higher understanding of God, than them, so they did what they did. Remember the words he said to Thomas, and his explanation to the rest of the apostles and disciples: "If I tell you one of the things which he told me, you will pick up stones and throw them at me; a fire will come out of the stones and burn you up." "Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head." A man of God has to accept that his Cross will be heavy, he will be ridiculed, rejected by many, but his solace is in God, the Light of his life, the only important thing in his life, who gives him the strength not to pass the cup meant for him, no matter the cost.

People like to talk about things they're clueless about, especially other religions, philosophies, paths. The major problem is when these things are debated, as understood by intellect only, which is a futile effort. Many people will never have personal mystic experiences, since they don't fulfil the prerequisites.

Sorry that this developed into this kind of thing, my intention was something completely different.

God bless
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
as for exploring Zen Buddhism, I see no issues with it. I personally explored (definition of the word is: inquire into or discuss (a subject) in detail) various denominations of Christianity, Sanatana Dharma (or what people call Hinduism, I focused on Yoga, which predates it), Theravada and Zen Buddhism, Kabbalah, Tarot, Astrology, Hermeticism, various occult philosophies and secret societies, even Western 'magick'. I also explored various forms of satanism, communism, Marxism, Zionism etc., since I have to know what I'm against, to understand their motivations, beliefs and goals.
Many of them proved worthwhile for me and made me understand Christ better, especially Yoga, and I deem some of the Yogic practices a staple of my daily spiritual routine. For example, if I didn't have a serious Yogic practice, I would never come back to seriously study Christianity. Most people know absolutely nothing about Yoga, real Yoga doesn't have anything to do with various deities etc., I'll keep it at that. I consider myself a Christian Yogi, and I know what Fr. Seraphim Rose wrote about that...
You've spent your life trying to commune with demons "For all of the gods of the nations are demons" and now you're convinced worshipping them is in line with Christ's teachings. Lord have mercy!
 

Lawrence87

Woodpecker
Orthodox
We tend to forget many things about Lord Jesus Christ's life. He was considered the arch-heretic in the religion he was born in, because he had higher understanding of God, than them, so they did what they did. Remember the words he said to Thomas, and his explanation to the rest of the apostles and disciples: "If I tell you one of the things which he told me, you will pick up stones and throw them at me; a fire will come out of the stones and burn you up." "Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head." A man of God has to accept that his Cross will be heavy, he will be ridiculed, rejected by many, but his solace is in God, the Light of his life, the only important thing in his life, who gives him the strength not to pass the cup meant for him, no matter the cost.

I wouldn't compare your own position to that of Christ. Not for one second.

You might hold views about the Trinity that are heretical. That does not make you comparable to Christ. This comment highlights the problem; pride. You think you have the answers, and you justify yourself by telling yourself you are being like Christ.

I would not even think about going anywhere near a monastery until you repent of this.
 

Aleksandar

 
Banned
Other Christian
We don't need the blessings of your "god".
Which God is "my god"? There's a single God, Creator of all. I'm honestly saddened by your attitude.
You've spent your life trying to commune with demons "For all of the gods of the nations are demons" and now you're convinced worshipping them is in line with Christ's teachings. Lord have mercy!
Can you tell me more? I'm unaware how I communed with demons. Which 'gods' did I worship? I'm asking you, because you seem to know more about my life and spiritual practice than myself.
I wouldn't compare your own position to that of Christ. Not for one second.

You might hold views about the Trinity that are heretical. That does not make you comparable to Christ. This comment highlights the problem; pride. You think you have the answers, and you justify yourself by telling yourself you are being like Christ.

I would not even think about going anywhere near a monastery until you repent of this.
Every man on the Christ's path needs to constantly compare his life to the life of his role model and Savior. By doing that, you realize how small your problems are, compared to the ones He faced. I think you didn't go to many monasteries, or spoke to many monks based on your last sentence. There's no pride in this, I'm simply doing my best to understand God. My views are shared by some of the Church Fathers.

I hope I don't get banned for simply stating my beliefs, it would be unfair. I also have no ill-will towards the members that attack me, it's not the first time, and it won't be the last time. I might even learn something valuable.
 

inthefade

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Many of them proved worthwhile for me and made me understand Christ better, especially Yoga, and I deem some of the Yogic practices a staple of my daily spiritual routine. For example, if I didn't have a serious Yogic practice, I would never come back to seriously study Christianity. Most people know absolutely nothing about Yoga, real Yoga doesn't have anything to do with various deities etc., I'll keep it at that. I consider myself a Christian Yogi, and I know what Fr. Seraphim Rose wrote about that...
How is yoga NOT worshipping and praying to other gods? Is that not exactly what the various poses are?
 

Lawrence87

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Every man on the Christ's path needs to constantly compare his life to the life of his role model and Savior. By doing that, you realize how small your problems are, compared to the ones He faced. I think you didn't go to many monasteries, or spoke to many monks based on your last sentence. There's no pride in this, I'm simply doing my best to understand God. My views are shared by some of the Church Fathers.

I hope I don't get banned for simply stating my beliefs, it would be unfair. I also have no ill-will towards the members that attack me, it's not the first time, and it won't be the last time. I might even learn something valuable.

But you are openly stating that you hold views that are widely rejected by the Orthodox church.
I have different views about the nature of God (Trinity), nature of Christ, immaculate conception

And you even admit that these bar you from participating in the Church services. So you are wanting to be a monk in the Orthodox church, but you are stating that you have these views which are different to what the Church teaches. This is pride. Thinking you know better than the Church, and then justifying it by making a comparison between yourself and Christ. In other words saying 'the church is wrong and I am right, and I'm being like Christ in doing this...'. This is utter pridefulness.

I wasn't saying you cannot visit a monastery, but you were speaking about becoming a monastic. When you hold views which are by your own admission precluding you from participating in the church, you cannot become a monk. Monks pray all the services every single day. Why would you do that if you don't believe in the same God?
 

NickK

 
Banned
Orthodox
You won't get banned, don't worry. If anything, it's more likely that I get banned.
Which God is "my god"? There's a single God, Creator of all. I'm honestly saddened by your attitude.

Can you tell me more? I'm unaware how I communed with demons. Which 'gods' did I worship? I'm asking you, because you seem to know more about my life and spiritual practice than myself.

Every man on the Christ's path needs to constantly compare his life to the life of his role model and Savior. By doing that, you realize how small your problems are, compared to the ones He faced. I think you didn't go to many monasteries, or spoke to many monks based on your last sentence. There's no pride in this, I'm simply doing my best to understand God. My views are shared by some of the Church Fathers.

I hope I don't get banned for simply stating my beliefs, it would be unfair. I also have no ill-will towards the members that attack me, it's not the first time, and it won't be the last time. I might even learn something valuable.
I took a look at that lady you cited before, Mrs Roberts. It's funny because you claimed you have discernement, yet you failed to recognise her delusions. Your god is a fundamentally gnostic invention.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
Can you tell me more? I'm unaware how I communed with demons. Which 'gods' did I worship? I'm asking you, because you seem to know more about my life and spiritual practice than myself.
What is yoga? What is kundalini energy? The literal meaning of yoga is 'yoke.' It means tying your will to the serpent kundalini and raising it to Shiva and experiencing your 'true' self. All paths of yoga are interconnected like branches of a tree. A tree with roots descending into the same areas of the spiritual world. This is evident in the ancient books the Bhagavad Gita and the Yogic Sutras of Patanjali. I learned that the ultimate goal of yoga is to awaken the kundalini energy coiled at the base of the spine in the image of a serpent so that it brings you to a state whereby you realize Tat Tvam Asi.8 Of course, yoga may facilitate exceptional experiences of body and mind. But so does the ingestion of mind-altering drugs, and flavorless, imperceptible poisons. Through yoga, little by little, one is harnessing shakti, which yogis refer to as the Divine Mother, the 'dark goddess' connected with other major Hindu gods. This energy isn't the Holy Spirit, and This isn't aerobics or gymnastics. Attached to this entire system are bhajans and kirtans – pagan equivalents to Orthodox Christian akathists, but for Hindu gods – as well as mantras, which are 'sacred' formulas, like calling cards or phone numbers, to the various pagan gurus and gods.
How is yoga connected with Hinduism? To be clear, Hinduism does not refer to a specific religion. It is a term the British gave to the various cults, philosophies and shamanistic religions of India. If you ask one Hindu if he believes in God, he may tell you that you are God. But ask another, and he will point to a rock, or statue, or a flame of fire. This is Hindu polarity: either you are God, or everything else is a god. Yoga is beneath this umbrella of Hinduism, and in many ways is the pole of the umbrella. It acts as a missionary arm for Hinduism and the New Age outside of India.9 Hinduism is like an extraordinary Russian nesting doll: you open one philosophy and within it are ten thousand more. And the unopened ones are risks. You may swim easily and carelessly in waters you do not know. But unaware of the tides and nuances of the area, you may be in danger. You may be swept away by the undertow. You may cut yourself against unseen rocks and contract imperceptible infection and poison. This happens in the spiritual life. When we dive in the ocean, we may be attracted to the brightest, most colorful and intriguing fish but the most colorful and exotic are often the most poisonous and deadly. The first time I visited India, I took off my shoes and socks and walked through the water, coconuts, discarded candy and shimmering fire of Kalkaji Temple. It is one of the most famous temples dedicated to Kali, ‘the goddess of death.’ I didn't know it, but I was right in the middle of her most important festival of the year. The temple was chaos and the energy very heightened and dark. Thousands of men, women and children gathered at this Rishikesh temple to worship this demon. Next to me, a woman's eyes rolled back in her head, arms waving back and forth, tongue wagging pink from her mouth, legs lifting and falling like a puppet on strings. This was clearly demonic possession. Once, I venerated the Sitka Mother of God icon10 and experienced incredible warmth, tears of humility and love, mental clarity, and peace. It was like walking in front of a window full of warm, fragrant sunshine. At Kalkaji temple, I experienced the opposite. Kali is often depicted as a frightful, many-armed goddess with purple skin raising a severed human head, a bloody tongue hanging from her mouth. She wears a necklace of human heads and a belt of arms
How is yoga connected to Orthodoxy? Yoga is a psychosomatic practice, an interaction between mind, body, and spirit(s). We must remember the word ‘yoga’ means 'yoke,' like the wooden crosspiece fastened over the necks of animals attached to the plow. St. Paul warns us, Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?18 Yoga isn't Scriptural nor is it otherwise part of our Church’s Holy Tradition. Everything we're looking for, everything, can be found in and through the Orthodox Church. So what would we want from yoga? It is important to know that in yoga, as well as many mystical schools, strange lights may accompany practitioners but these are often from demons or created lights of the mind, for Satan himself transforms himself into an angel of light. 19 Many have and are following the 'spiritual fireworks’ of the so-called 'new' age. Of course, this is not the Uncreated Light experienced by Moses and the disciples on Mount Tabor. It is not the Divine Light St. Gregory Palamas defended in the 14th century against western scholasticism. Direct knowledge of God is possible, and direct experience, but knowledge and experience of evil is also certainly available. We have freewill to choose whom and what we seek. This, of course, requires discernment and testing, where accountability before an experienced priest or elder is absolutely necessary. Indispensable, too, is heartfelt participation in the Mysteries of the Church. We do better looking into the mysteries of our hearts than entertaining these imaginations of the head.

Furthermore, something should be said in relation to the claim that ‘pop’ forms of gym yoga carry no danger or threat to a practitioner. Someone who holds such an opinion is either ignorant of, or chooses to ignore, the many warnings that appear in the eastern yoga manuals concerning the Hatha yoga that is practiced in such classes. Is the instructor aware of these warnings and able to guarantee that no harm will come to the student? In his book Seven Schools of Yoga, Ernest Wood begins his description of Hatha yoga by stating, “I must not refer to any of these Hatha Yoga practices without sounding a severe warning. Many people have brought upon themselves incurable illness and even madness by practicing them without providing the proper conditions of body and mind. The yoga books are full of such warnings…. For example, the Gheranda Samhita announces that if one begins the practices in hot, cold or rainy weather, diseases will be contracted, and also if there is not moderation in diet, for only one half the stomach must ever be filled with solid food…. The Hatha Yoga Pradipika states that control of breath must be brought about very gradually, ‘as lions, elephants and tigers are tamed,’ or ‘the experimenter will be killed,’ and by any mistake there arises cough, asthma, head, eye and ear pains, and many other diseases.” Wood concludes his warning about posture and breathing yoga by saying, “I should like to make it clear that I am not recommending these practices, as I hold that all Hatha Yogas are extremely dangerous”. 20

This is why Ecumenism is the pan-heresy; it aims to invite demon worshippers as monastics into our monasteries, to permit them to become clergy, to permit them to teach our children. When you criticize them, oh, you're being mean, you're being judgmental.

You yourself know yoga better than I do, you know it is Hindu worship, you know what the bible says about the "gods" of other nations.
 

Aleksandar

 
Banned
Other Christian
Yoga is demonic. Do not promote it on the forum.
How is yoga NOT worshipping and praying to other gods? Is that not exactly what the various poses are?

If you're truly interested, read Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, that's the only defining scripture for Yoga. Everything else is a mixture of native culture and Pagan religion of the Indian peninsula and the real thing.

I don't blame you for the ignorance you present, it's no wonder, since real Yoga is almost non-existent. Real Yoga is a monastic discipline, I'm a pseudo-Yogi so to say, since I live in an apartment, have personal items etc.

For example, what you call "poses", is called asana, it's one out of eight practices of Yoga. An interesting thing: those poses that you mention were all made up in the last 300 years, in real Yoga, there are only 8 asanas, and they are all seated positions for meditation. I don't practice any of the poses anymore, simply because it's time consuming and doesn't do too much for me anymore.

Another thing - women weren't allowed to practice Yoga up to 150 years ago and they still shouldn't be.

This is the exact reason why I explored these topics personally, so I'm not misled by ignorance and propaganda.

God bless
 

Lawrence87

Woodpecker
Orthodox
If you're truly interested, read Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, that's the only defining scripture for Yoga. Everything else is a mixture of native culture and Pagan religion of the Indian peninsula and the real thing.

I don't blame you for the ignorance you present, it's no wonder, since real Yoga is almost non-existent. Real Yoga is a monastic discipline, I'm a pseudo-Yogi so to say, since I live in an apartment, have personal items etc.

For example, what you call "poses", is called asana, it's one out of eight practices of Yoga. An interesting thing: those poses that you mention were all made up in the last 300 years, in real Yoga, there are only 8 asanas, and they are all seated positions for meditation. I don't practice any of the poses anymore, simply because it's time consuming and doesn't do too much for me anymore.

Another thing - women weren't allowed to practice Yoga up to 150 years ago and they still shouldn't be.

This is the exact reason why I explored these topics personally, so I'm not misled by ignorance and propaganda.

God bless

You seem extremely confused. How many Orthodox monasteries are going to give you a blessing to practise Yoga and read Yogic sutras etc?

Stretching is fine, but you seem to be talking about going in depth with the philosophy and history etc. This doesn't seem at all compatible with the Orthodox way of life.

Sounds like you are being mislead by your own self-will
 

Aleksandar

 
Banned
Other Christian
You won't get banned, don't worry. If anything, it's more likely that I get banned.

I took a look at that lady you cited before, Mrs Roberts. It's funny because you claimed you have discernement, yet you failed to recognise her delusions. Your god is a fundamentally gnostic invention.

Nick, I envy your intellectual and spiritual prowess, in less than an hour you fully understood and made a conclusion about life's work of a woman who has 8 and a half years of Christian Monastic contemplative practice, 4 children, several diplomas, a Montesori school, worked with children who are mentally undeveloped and wrote 4+ books.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
Nick, I envy your intellectual and spiritual prowess, in less than an hour you fully understood and made a conclusion about life's work of a woman who has 8 and a half years of Christian Monastic contemplative practice, 4 children, several diplomas, a Montesori school, worked with children who are mentally undeveloped and wrote 4+ books.
From her website:

WARNING

Those who believe the man Jesus who walked this earth 2000 years ago was God, should read no further. Since I hold no human being is God, those who disagree will only find this book upsetting and disagreeable. This writing is not for those convinced they have the last word on Christ, but those searching for the real Christ. While I believe all Christians have the right Faith, I do not think all Christians have the right beliefs, right understanding or right view of Christ. Given all the Jesus-talk these days, Christianity comes across as a personality cult, the worship of a human being, which has nothing to do with Christ, it even turns people away. The reason for this writing is my perception that the real Christ has been all but lost to Christianity.
So she's an Arian heretic. And that took me five minutes.
 

inthefade

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
If you're truly interested, read Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, that's the only defining scripture for Yoga. Everything else is a mixture of native culture and Pagan religion of the Indian peninsula and the real thing.

I don't blame you for the ignorance you present, it's no wonder, since real Yoga is almost non-existent. Real Yoga is a monastic discipline, I'm a pseudo-Yogi so to say, since I live in an apartment, have personal items etc.

For example, what you call "poses", is called asana, it's one out of eight practices of Yoga. An interesting thing: those poses that you mention were all made up in the last 300 years, in real Yoga, there are only 8 asanas, and they are all seated positions for meditation. I don't practice any of the poses anymore, simply because it's time consuming and doesn't do too much for me anymore.

Another thing - women weren't allowed to practice Yoga up to 150 years ago and they still shouldn't be.

This is the exact reason why I explored these topics personally, so I'm not misled by ignorance and propaganda.

God bless
Stop with the god bless nonsense. Sounds like you're talking about gnosticism are you not? You think that anyone can become Christ by practicing the sutras?

I also find various philosophies interesting, but I would not come on to an orthodox forum to spout off heresy and call anyone who asks questions ignorant.

Why did you create this thread? You know you could not join an orthodox monastery.
 
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