Being Strong is Wrong

Watchman72

Sparrow
Interesting....but how do you teach translation/vocabulary to your students if you don't know or aren't allowed to speak their language?
How do you teach what certain words and phrases mean, grammar rules, or, I assume, this part is done only by reading?
You tell them "chicken" or "what's your name?" - don't you have to translate it to them to teach - unless it's something they get from reading material only, where they can see Vietnamese and English side by side.
So, I'd imagine, in a system like that, each lesson would probably have a required reading to get prepared, with a list of words and phrases to learn, with Vietnamese translation.
And how do you help a struggling student who needs something explained or is it not required because it's not one-on-one?
Most of the time there is no need to translate anything. Flashcards with pictures don't require translations, and the human brain will extract grammar rules and assimilate them via comprehensible input from the textbooks.
Anyway, most of the time there will be a Vietnamese teaching assistant helping you with any communication/translation issues if they occur.
The TA will do most of the heavy lifting.
The foreign teacher will do all the easy stuff.
 

aynrus

Pelican
Most of the time there is no need to translate anything. Flashcards with pictures don't require translations, and the human brain will extract grammar rules and assimilate them via comprehensible input from the textbooks.
Anyway, most of the time there will be a Vietnamese teaching assistant helping you with any communication/translation issues if they occur.
The TA will do most of the heavy lifting.
The foreign teacher will do all the easy stuff.
Oh I see, didn't realize there were TAs. I guess TAs are bilingual but just don't have good enough English to teach on their own.
And I guess one can show stuff on the projector screen too, showing local translation.
 
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Gremlin

Robin
Ditto.
Teaching English in Vietnam at the moment.
I've got a decent life, a low stress work environment, and I'm able to save around 70% of my income, working less than 30 hours per week.
I've been in Vietnam for 4 years. You can't beat the 10% income tax and the usually low stress work environment, although I've increased my weekly hours from 20 to 35 to pay off my mortgage. Where are you in Nam?
 

kazz

Kingfisher
I was planning to do the motorbike ride across Vietnam before covid, good to see your enjoying it there, it seems less sleezy than thailand or phills, is that true, I have not been to Asia at all I should say.
 

aynrus

Pelican
Yep. Vietnam is not as sleezy as Thailand.
The Viets are quite conservative when it comes to sex.

https://pagesix.com/2019/06/08/vietnamese-model-disciplined-for-wearing-skimpy-dress-at-cannes/
I got to say there're recent reports of foreign women assaulted by a group of as many as 25 men in Vietnam. So if someone has a daughter or non-Vietnamese wife not sure about safety. With what's going on I'd expect crime to be higher than before as people get poorer.
 

aynrus

Pelican
I've been in Vietnam for 4 years. You can't beat the 10% income tax and the usually low stress work environment, although I've increased my weekly hours from 20 to 35 to pay off my mortgage. Where are you in Nam?
10% up to $5200/year - progressive scale. Then 15% and over $16,600/year - 25%, and then more.
If someone is a resident but gets income from overseas which easily might be on the higher end, rate can be quite big, make over 27K/year and it's 30%, over 41.5K - 35%.
I think this is recent table:

Non-residents looks like have 20% income tax rate.
But I'm not sure if there're mandatory social security taxes for residents - in a lot of countries these can be a huge chunk (like many in Europe)
 

Gremlin

Robin
10% up to $5200/year - progressive scale. Then 15% and over $16,600/year - 25%, and then more.
If someone is a resident but gets income from overseas which easily might be on the higher end, rate can be quite big, make over 27K/year and it's 30%, over 41.5K - 35%.
I think this is recent table:

Non-residents looks like have 20% income tax rate.
But I'm not sure if there're mandatory social security taxes for residents - in a lot of countries these can be a huge chunk (like many in Europe)
I've done the math on my paychecks. I'm only paying a 10% income tax. It's higher during the three month probationary periods for foreigners - up to 25%. Natives who don't make more than 10 million dong a month don't pay an income tax.
 

aynrus

Pelican
I've done the math on my paychecks. I'm only paying a 10% income tax. It's higher during the three month probationary periods for foreigners - up to 25%. Natives who don't make more than 10 million dong a month don't pay an income tax.
May be there's a big personal deduction/exemption amount?
Taxes on a paycheck are usually pre-deduction, but what they tax out of the paycheck isn't necessarily what one owes. Officially 10% is for up to 5200USD/year.
There's another source for tax rates, seem to be the same as the other table:
 

Gremlin

Robin
May be there's a big personal deduction/exemption amount?
Taxes on a paycheck are usually pre-deduction, but what they tax out of the paycheck isn't necessarily what one owes. Officially 10% is for up to 5200USD/year.
There's another source for tax rates, seem to be the same as the other table:
I've never had to file taxes in Vietnam. It's all done through the employer through paychecks. I'm making a lot more than $5200 a year and my income tax never exceeded 10% except during the probationary period.
 

aynrus

Pelican
I've never had to file taxes in Vietnam. It's all done through the employer through paychecks. I'm making a lot more than $5200 a year and my income tax never exceeded 10% except during the probationary period.
It seems like there's a standard deduction of 9M dong/month (108M per year) - around $4800/year, and only for employment income.
So if someone makes, say, $9K/year they can get into 10% tax bracket with this deduction.

Basically, the deduction seems to allow to reduce tax rate rougly by 5% but only for lower incomes under 16K USD/year.
(tax rate would still be high for someone getting higher income such as typical income from overseas, seems like)

There're also more deductions for children/dependents and for mandatory insurance contributions (including social security).

I'm not sure if you meant paying 10% income tax or total tax from paycheck including social security tax.
Social security tax seems to be 8%
Prior to 1 December 2018, compulsory SI contributions were applicable to Vietnamese individuals only. Effective from 1 December 2018, SI contributions are also applicable to foreign individuals working in Vietnam under a work permit, practising certificate, or licence and having labour contracts with an indefinite term or a definite term of one year or more
 
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Gremlin

Robin
It seems like there's a standard deduction of 9M dong/month (108M per year) - around $4800/year, and only for employment income.
So if someone makes, say, $9K/year they can get into 10% tax bracket with this deduction.

Basically, the deduction seems to allow to reduce tax rate rougly by 5% but only for lower incomes under 16K USD/year.
(tax rate would still be high for someone getting higher income such as typical income from overseas, seems like)

There're also more deductions for children/dependents and for mandatory insurance contributions (including social security).
That's not my experience or the experience of any other foreigner I've met, and I never claimed any deductions although I could. The US tax ass rape didn't follow me here.
 

aynrus

Pelican
That's not my experience or the experience of any other foreigner I've met, and I never claimed any deductions although I could. The US tax ass rape didn't follow me here.
Your employer probably automatically applied deductions, this is how they usually handle this.
Well, these are official tax rates and deductions I shared above, including Social Security tax that foreigners must pay too.
What employer deducts from paycheck this doesn't equal tax liability.

US taxation - US persons are subject to US taxes no matter where they live, that's for sure.
If you don't pay US taxes on Vietnamese income it could be because tax treaty prevents double taxation and your US income tax liability would be $0 also because of over 12K standard deduction.
I'm not sure what your Vietnam income is, most likely under 10K USD if you end up with 10% income tax rate (assuming don't owe anything to Vietnam without knowing it) - you'd pay very little in the US on that income (no income tax because under standard deduction and social security tax/7% for employees, would be offset by Earned Income Tax Credit) and with 1 child dependent it's be 0 tax liability plus a check from the government.
 
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