Best Christian Country to expat to by/before 2024

bmw633

Woodpecker
I am currently living in the Philippines, and folks where I live in Leyte are very devout Christians. Predominantly a Catholic country, they are not afraid to have bible verse signs on their tricycle taxis. Culturally, it reminds me of 1960's, but the health care is of a similar vintage, so that is why I am flying back to the US end of the month.

Wife is waiting on a Visa interview, suspended since March due to CV19. Maybe things will open up once China Joe takes office.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
Good breakdown on Bulgaria. Thanks. If the language wasn’t so severe and not so far away I would consider it for relocation. It’s my favorite place I’ve been.
I don't think the language is any tougher than other languages. Perhaps the Cyrillic alphabet is intimidating. I always found it interesting and my now wife, then girlfriend, taught it to me with flashcards while at work years ago. Then when in Bulgaria I'd read every sign/menu I came across. Before I knew it I could read Cyrillic. And the audio of the language slows down when there.

But you can get by pretty easy with a mix of Bulgarian/English in major cities.

Edna voda, edna golyam rakia, e shopska salata ne luk e kebapcheta.

Not perfect Bulgarian but it works. You just ordered my favorite meal. Water, a large rakia, shopska without onion and awesome Bulgarian kebabs.

If you like a place you adapt quickly.
 

Aizen

Kingfisher
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Elmore

Kingfisher
Nice to hear and to change the subjects from the US elections for a bit.

It depends what you are used to in terms of size. For me a town with a population of 70 thousand is a bit tiny, but if you are with your partner it can be a great place to raise kids.

Turnovo used to be a capital back a few centuries, plenty of tiny subcultures and all kinds of music, some artists (not of the sjw variety) and overall very affordable cost of living. Probably 1/2 of the rents in Sofia. International presence increased in the last few years but not to its detriment, it is just a bit easier for a foreigner to settle now (Westerners mostly appear in the summer).

It is probably one of the prettiest cities in Bulgaria, but Plovdid is similar and much bigger, while closer to the airport of Sofia (due to the highway). Plovdiv is also a very right wing place and they passionately resist the pride parade, albeit the folks themselves are very hospi
Sofia almost seems like East Berlin in terms of cosmopolitanism. Luckily, apart from a few Sjws (usually studied abroad, especially UK), the rest of the people are very well informed in their disdain for the globalist causes.

PS our language is simpler than Russian once you get into it, even if they are both sound very similar from Western perspective.

How affected are specific areas of Bulgaria with Gypsys?

Having lived around various Central European countries, i've come to realise that this is a very strong factor to consider, in regards to whether to settle in an area. Doubly so if purchasing property, obviously.
 

JohnKreese

Pelican
e shopska salata
:like::like::like:
Also just read that Serbia allows U.S. citizens. But you need to get the Covid-test.

"From 20 December until 10 January, all visitors to Serbia must arrive with a negative PCR test taken in the 48 hours before arrival. You will be refused entry if you do not have a negative test result. Tests cannot be taken on arrival."

It is possible that they will extend this, but I think that the requirement was put in place for the influx of people heading back to the Balkans for Orthodox Christmas (some of the largest backups at the borders in years). Now that Christmas is "over", Serbia might open back up (test free).
 

dave299

Chicken
I'm considering moving to one of 3 Christian European countries and will be dedicating my time to learning the language of said country.

My top picks are:
Bulgaria/Poland/Hungary.


Could some of you guys that have been there list the pros and cons of each ?
Job sectors/economies/dating/quality of life compared to the United states etc.

I'm very close to being done with America and the societal rot .
Hi, I am from the United States living in Germany. Germany is rotten and filth, it's become a migrant paradise and is nothing more than a giant melting pot of the worst countries in the world; afghanistan, pakistan, syria ect...

Central Europe is long gone. My girlfriend is from Bulgaria and I have been there. It is a massive dumb and the corruption is high. The old communist party there now has their kids in government and it is no place to live. There's a completely different mentality in Bulgaria, the people don't have much to lose, they earn around 250 to 500 euros per month. The streets are a disaster and there's a ton of con artists.

I had for a brief time this romantic thought of moving to Bulgaria where there would be beautiful women and traditional but you can forget about that. Apart from the horrendously depressing architecture, there's a huge amount of women that are prostitutes. It's really not a good place to live. There's good people there but the environment there creates a lot of problems.

One last thing, if you do have contact with people from Yugoslavia (Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia) they will most likely say they are orthodox but are not serious. They say this and many will say they believe in God, always say God sees everything, then they will go on to say they don't believe in the devil and talk endlessly about karma.

The point is not all are like this but going to a country that is orthodox means nothing. America is a catholic/christian country and many would say they are christians but how many actually are saved?

Don't even think about Russia or Ukraine, you go there as a foreigner and you will never fit in. A traditional woman there will want a traditional man from her own country. I can't speak for Poland, although there's a general trend in Europe heading towards progressivism.

Hungary is a beautiful old-fashioned country next to Austria. Austria is absolutely beautiful and closeby. They have made an effort to keep their country clean and limit migrants. Hungary unfortunately is a major pass through to Germany and is often flooded with migrants. Don't make the same mistake I did thinking you will escape the degeneracy by running away from it. You will need to make your own world and limit the things you let into your mind.

Europe also tends to give one the feeling of spending a lot of time at the dmv. You may also want to consider keeping citizenship and looking if your target country allows dual citizenship. If you are abroad five years it would be good to spend that in a country that allows dual citizenship so you will be allowed two passports.

Hope this helps in some way
 

Bitter End

Woodpecker
How affected are specific areas of Bulgaria with Gypsys?

Having lived around various Central European countries, i've come to realise that this is a very strong factor to consider, in regards to whether to settle in an area. Doubly so if purchasing property, obviously.
The gypsies are indeed a problem and the local benefit-leeching class. Some of them are decent, but they are overrepresented in crime statistics ten fold. However, they usually have their gypsy (no-go) zones and are much maligned when they walk towards normal districts. Sadly I am not sure about their exact distribution, but you will rarely come into contact with them (unless you opt for a real cheap sh**hole of a neighborhood). Some uglier cities such as Sliven have higher concentration. Turnovo is clean in that regard and in Plovdiv you might never encounter them unless you go specifically to their district.

dave299, very exaggerated points, it would be good if you applied the same standards to each country. The Balkans have a high gini coefficient because you either make good money or you are working a very disposable job. I don't know an English speaker that makes less than 700 euro net. In a city where a pint of beer costs 2 euro in a restaurant and the rent is about 250-300 for a small single flat. The cost of living comparison is highly useful tool that can settle these arguments easily.

My expat friends are having a blast, whether with IT focus or online consulting. But fair point, the Balkans are not that devout to their religion, but they do have the basic values right.

I lived nine years in Austria, never met a more cucked society. The conservatives are extremely quiet, people like Martin Sellner are torn to shreds and Kurz is having to get friendlier and friendlier with Soros to keep some of the good connections going. Vienna is the ultimate leftist sanatorium. One look at their Bahnhofs will show you how "conservative" this rich and pampered society is. Additionally, I believe Americans are very extroverted people and the sterile environment would make them lose their minds quickly, unless one wants to live and develop in the expat community.
 

Pelagius

Robin
I had for a brief time this romantic thought of moving to Bulgaria where there would be beautiful women and traditional but you can forget about that. Apart from the horrendously depressing architecture, there's a huge amount of women that are prostitutes. It's really not a good place to live. There's good people there but the environment there creates a lot of problems.
^ Basically everyone that wants to run away to Belarus and most other EE countries will experience this too.
Don't even think about Russia or Ukraine, you go there as a foreigner and you will never fit in. A traditional woman there will want a traditional man from her own country. I can't speak for Poland, although there's a general trend in Europe heading towards progressivism.
Mostly true from my experience too. You can't expect to turn up to a place not knowing the language and be accepted by a traditional girl and her family. It does happen, but it's on the rare side and also - there's always that question of if you stay in that country (which will probably grind on you eventually) or move back to the West where your wife will be told to strip all of this patriarchal abuse and become an independent woman after you've stripped her from her friends and family which will have an impact.

As for Poland, it may be the Wests Poster-child of traditional life but it's falling. One of the thing that has kept it safe is it's language barrier but that's falling away and the things Roosh wrote about before are now x10. There are many young women I know that are actively working to help migrants come on boats to get work in Poland and if you search it on YouTube by 'new' you will see the same thing. There is a huge group of liberal pro-eu antifa types which can be documented by the increase of the graffiti over the cities in recent years. The faith is also seemingly good because lots of people attend church, but if you actually scratch conversation with them they reveal extremely libertarian attitudes that are born from the the tame narrative of the Catholic Churches.

The people you will align yourself too (the nationalists) mostly won't speak your language and in general they don't like the English and also if you don't go to a big city you'll need to spend a long time learning the language to go to Mass.

And then there's the economic side - as in, it can be difficult to get a job as a white person if you don't speak the language. And when you do get a job you'll work for far less than other countries for the same amount of hours which shocks a lot of people.

It's not that Poland is bad, it's better than many places but also corona is a serious thing and you can get a cumlative fine of 30,000 zl for non-mask and extra failings and the Police circle residential areas to catch people and fine them.

All of these reasons and much more are why most Expats don't stay in Central Europe or Eastern Europe in the long run and why many from those countries long to move to the UK even from the Capital cities.
 

Pelagius

Robin
Also in regards to Poland the narrative right now is that mandatory vaccination is not planned however there was a leaked document that I cannot find now from August of last year that if passed would give Poland the option to enforce vaccination through the armed forces.

It's something worth remembering about all countries really - always read into their histories and recent legal changes to get a full picture of the plans.

OK found it;



Art. 36. - [Use of direct coercion measures] - Prevention and combating infections and infectious diseases in people.

Journal of Laws

Journal of Laws 2020.1845, i.e. Effective act

Version from: October 20, 2020

Art. 36. [Application of direct coercive measures]

  1. A person who does not undergo the compulsory vaccination, sanitary and epidemiological tests, sanitary procedures, quarantine or isolation of compulsory hospitalization, who is suspected or diagnosed with a particularly dangerous and highly contagious disease, posing a direct threat to the health or life of other people, a measure of direct coercion involving the holding, immobilization or forcible administration of drugs should be used.
2. The decision on the application of a measure of direct coercion is decided by a doctor or a medical assistant who determines the type of the measure of direct coercion used and personally supervises its implementation by medical professionals. Each case of the use of a measure of direct coercion is recorded in the medical records.

3. A doctor or a medical assistant may apply to the Police, Border Guard or Military Police for help in applying a measure of direct coercion. Provision of assistance takes place on condition that officers or soldiers are equipped with measures to protect against infectious diseases by that doctor or paramedic.

4. Before the application of a direct coercive measure, the person to whom the direct coercive measure is to be used is informed about it and the fact is recorded in the medical records. When choosing a direct coercive measure, one should choose the least burdensome measure for this person, and when using a direct coercive measure, one should exercise particular caution and care for the welfare of this person.

5. Direct coercion involving immobilization may not be used for more than 4 hours. If necessary, the application of this obligation may be extended for further 6-hour periods, but not longer than 24 hours in total.

6. Holding is a temporary, short-term immobilization of a person with the use of physical force.

7. Immobilization is a longer-lasting incapacitation of a person with the use of belts, handles, sheets or a straitjacket.

8. Compulsory administration of a drug is an immediate or planned treatment introduction of drugs into a person's body - without their consent


Also of note:

 
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dave299

Chicken
The gypsies are indeed a problem and the local benefit-leeching class. Some of them are decent, but they are overrepresented in crime statistics ten fold. However, they usually have their gypsy (no-go) zones and are much maligned when they walk towards normal districts. Sadly I am not sure about their exact distribution, but you will rarely come into contact with them (unless you opt for a real cheap sh**hole of a neighborhood). Some uglier cities such as Sliven have higher concentration. Turnovo is clean in that regard and in Plovdiv you might never encounter them unless you go specifically to their district.

dave299, very exaggerated points, it would be good if you applied the same standards to each country. The Balkans have a high gini coefficient because you either make good money or you are working a very disposable job. I don't know an English speaker that makes less than 700 euro net. In a city where a pint of beer costs 2 euro in a restaurant and the rent is about 250-300 for a small single flat. The cost of living comparison is highly useful tool that can settle these arguments easily.

My expat friends are having a blast, whether with IT focus or online consulting. But fair point, the Balkans are not that devout to their religion, but they do have the basic values right.

I lived nine years in Austria, never met a more cucked society. The conservatives are extremely quiet, people like Martin Sellner are torn to shreds and Kurz is having to get friendlier and friendlier with Soros to keep some of the good connections going. Vienna is the ultimate leftist sanatorium. One look at their Bahnhofs will show you how "conservative" this rich and pampered society is. Additionally, I believe Americans are very extroverted people and the sterile environment would make them lose their minds quickly, unless one wants to live and develop in the expat community.
The longer you stay in any country the more you will learn to dislike it especially when it's not your home. If you get sick of Austria and go to Bulgaria you may find you've made a mistake. I wouldn't call my points exaggerated. Austria is much better than Germany. When you spend a lot of time in any country it will be difficult because in the end you can't really make it home and you will always be unable to make a genuine attachment. I am a coder and work from my laptop, you can indeed earn the global currency and are not limited to earning in their currency. In that case you can live well but the problem is stepping foot in a jungle everytime you go outside. The other point is the architecture in these post communist countries starts to wear on you real fast. Being surrounded by ugliness can start to wear on a guy real fast. Communistic architecture was designed to psychologically wear on people after all, and take away feelings of hope.
 

Bitter End

Woodpecker
Sure you made good points, but then again, Hungary has the same issues as these. The current growth phase in Eastern and Central Europe is contributing to great new modern housing projects. Plus, none of the soviet buildings are a factor in the smaller areas.

I did come back from Austria and I take great comfort in living in a sane society. Not everyone is a conservative at heart, but the people's hearts are the right place. Same from Czech Republic to Belarus. The best way to learn about communism is to endure it.

PS Bulgaria, Montenegro, Romania... all have great geography for spending time outdoors, whether in the mountains or on the beach.
 

Deepdiver

Crow
Gold Member
I have Grown to appreciate the philosophy of:

Go Where You Are Treated Best!

Popularized by the Nomad Capitalist...


I am also a fan of the lawyer and Anti-Sex tourism YTer Conor Clyne whose focus is an upscale lifestyle for extended periods in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine ... Great content and Anti Scam Feral female seminars from a lawyer with Extensive on the Ground expertise as well as his favorite Country Brazil... He rarely visits his home country of Ireland preferring the three major white Slavic countries known for slim beautiful women.

 

Cortés

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Does anyone have any thoughts on South American countries? In particular, Paraguay seems to have a very Christian population.
@Tercio VII is from there I believe and has posted about Paraguay.

I found that Brazil had a strong catholic population, not just nominal Catholics like the Spanish speaking countries. However Brazil is even more vulnerable to racial problems, actual communism and the NWO. Bolsonaro is doing great work against that though
 
Does anyone have any thoughts on South American countries? In particular, Paraguay seems to have a very Christian population.
Yes, Paraguay is majority Christian, with Catholics being top, followed by Evangelicals/Baptists, and Mormons getting quite noticeable these last years. Other denominations are scarce. So far I’ve seen one Anglican and a small Orthodox church in the capital, although I know there’re more Orthodox churches in the south, among the Slavic diaspora. While I’m not a frequent churchgoer, churches are pretty active, even in the middle of the pandemic.
 

joost

Kingfisher
Does anyone have any thoughts on South American countries? In particular, Paraguay seems to have a very Christian population.

Paraguay is a shithole. You have the advantage of low taxes so you see some fancy cars here and there but the infrastructure is bad and crime rampant. Girls are easy, but you have to get them young (18) before they pop a kid. If you don't look local, they stare at you (same happened when I was in Bolivia. I was walking in a park and everybody staring at me, crazy).

Brazil is big so there's too many options to choose from. The big advantage is the currency who crashed last year and things are cheap (for now). Girls are easy if you look foreigner but I don't think they're marriage-material.


I dated Colombian girls and it was a great experience. I just visited the Bogotá for a month and it was an okay experience. I'm not sure I could live there. I don't know how life is as a single man there. But cost of living was cheap.

Colombia is a 3 hour flight from Miami. A roundtrip ticket is $200 these days. Pretty easy to visit and return to US if you don't like.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
Hi, I am from the United States living in Germany. Germany is rotten and filth, it's become a migrant paradise and is nothing more than a giant melting pot of the worst countries in the world; afghanistan, pakistan, syria ect...

Central Europe is long gone. My girlfriend is from Bulgaria and I have been there. It is a massive dumb and the corruption is high. The old communist party there now has their kids in government and it is no place to live. There's a completely different mentality in Bulgaria, the people don't have much to lose, they earn around 250 to 500 euros per month. The streets are a disaster and there's a ton of con artists.

I had for a brief time this romantic thought of moving to Bulgaria where there would be beautiful women and traditional but you can forget about that. Apart from the horrendously depressing architecture, there's a huge amount of women that are prostitutes. It's really not a good place to live. There's good people there but the environment there creates a lot of problems.

One last thing, if you do have contact with people from Yugoslavia (Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia) they will most likely say they are orthodox but are not serious. They say this and many will say they believe in God, always say God sees everything, then they will go on to say they don't believe in the devil and talk endlessly about karma.

The point is not all are like this but going to a country that is orthodox means nothing. America is a catholic/christian country and many would say they are christians but how many actually are saved?

Don't even think about Russia or Ukraine, you go there as a foreigner and you will never fit in. A traditional woman there will want a traditional man from her own country. I can't speak for Poland, although there's a general trend in Europe heading towards progressivism.

Hungary is a beautiful old-fashioned country next to Austria. Austria is absolutely beautiful and closeby. They have made an effort to keep their country clean and limit migrants. Hungary unfortunately is a major pass through to Germany and is often flooded with migrants. Don't make the same mistake I did thinking you will escape the degeneracy by running away from it. You will need to make your own world and limit the things you let into your mind.

Europe also tends to give one the feeling of spending a lot of time at the dmv. You may also want to consider keeping citizenship and looking if your target country allows dual citizenship. If you are abroad five years it would be good to spend that in a country that allows dual citizenship so you will be allowed two passports.

Hope this helps in some way
Well if you're going to escape from the rotten Western societal path and comforts, you'll just have to put on your big boy pants and get on with it. No one has said Central/Eastern Europe will bring the comforts soft westerners are accustomed to.

Life is an exercise of tradeoffs and compromises.

It's also a matter of perspective. I know a number of people including myself who would be more than happy in places you call a disaster. If you think Bulgarian streets are disaster I hope you never come to NY or SF. If you complain about the average salary in Bulgaria being low, you fail to see the opportunity for the creative foreigner.
 

talvesh

Chicken
@Tercio VII is from there I believe and has posted about Paraguay.

I found that Brazil had a strong catholic population, not just nominal Catholics like the Spanish speaking countries. However Brazil is even more vulnerable to racial problems, actual communism and the NWO. Bolsonaro is doing great work against that though

Brazil is beautiful and has many upsides. I think it's important to mention that southern Brazil(Santa Catarina, Rio Grande) are very livable. While many of my friends would disagree with this I just can't ever recommend living in large Brazilian cities. Crime and ghetto culture are unavoidable.
 
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