Best English Language Bible?

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Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
Yeah, I had a NRSV Bible for a scriptural literature class I took in college. It basically made reading the Bible feel like a dry, academic text.

I've been reading the NKJV lately and actually really appreciate this translation. Retains some literary artfulness, but not the archaic expressions and vocabulary that's substantially changed in the last 400 years since the original KJV. I feel it's a bit prettier than the ESV, which can get really clunky in, say, Paul's epistles: ESV is great for serious study, but not so great for, say, reading aloud to your family, though it depends on which book you're reading.
 
Does anyone have a recommendation for an audio version of the Bible? I've found myself walking and driving a lot more lately so the physical version isn't always practical.

There are quite a few versions on Audible, but many reviews say they are poorly organized and difficult to skip to certain chapters.
 
Used to rely on the abridged New American Catholic bibles when I was younger as I used to find the King James version just daunting or more likely I was just intellectually lazy.
The older I've gotten, it's back to the King James. I'm not keen on meaning being diminished through the lens of oversimplification.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Does anyone have a recommendation for an audio version of the Bible? I've found myself walking and driving a lot more lately so the physical version isn't always practical.

There are quite a few versions on Audible, but many reviews say they are poorly organized and difficult to skip to certain chapters.

There's an smartphone app called Bible.is that lets you listen to a ton of different versions, including in other languages. You can skip to and download different sections easily.
 

typtre

Robin
I recently purchased the KJV after reading this thread.

I had my doubts about it going in because I recently became aware he was a Freemason.
It is also the Book in The Book of Eli which is an interesting movie but still Hollywood and hence, likely a Psyop.

Now I've been doing some more research and I no longer feel like I can go on with this one. I would have liked one in my own language (Swedish) but they seem to be no better, following in the steps of Luther (who was also a Freemason).

Is there a proper Bible that hasn't been corrupted by Satan?
 

bucky

Ostrich
I recently purchased the KJV after reading this thread.

I had my doubts about it going in because I recently became aware he was a Freemason.
It is also the Book in The Book of Eli which is an interesting movie but still Hollywood and hence, likely a Psyop.

Now I've been doing some more research and I no longer feel like I can go on with this one. I would have liked one in my own language (Swedish) but they seem to be no better, following in the steps of Luther (who was also a Freemason).

Is there a proper Bible that hasn't been corrupted by Satan?
This might seem like a goofy response, but do you know any Latin? If you're at all proficient in Latin, the Vulgate is pretty easy to read. Learning to read the Church Latin of the Vulgate is certainly much easier than learning Koine Greek and Ancient Hebrew, and I'd imagine that most Christian theologians would consider it the translation of the Bible that's closest to the original.

If you want to read the Bible in English or Swedish and don't want a Protestant translation or one you feel is influenced by Masonry, why not ask a Catholic or Orthodox priest? Seems like it would be a pretty easy question for them.
 

typtre

Robin
This might seem like a goofy response, but do you know any Latin? If you're at all proficient in Latin, the Vulgate is pretty easy to read. Learning to read the Church Latin of the Vulgate is certainly much easier than learning Koine Greek and Ancient Hebrew, and I'd imagine that most Christian theologians would consider it the translation of the Bible that's closest to the original.

If you want to read the Bible in English or Swedish and don't want a Protestant translation or one you feel is influenced by Masonry, why not ask a Catholic or Orthodox priest? Seems like it would be a pretty easy question for them.

I don't know Latin :( All school taught me were industrious languages, like German.

There are absolutely zero Catholics and/or Orthodox priests where I live. The best is Lutherians who think the Swedish Church has strayed from the path with their female and LGBTQP+Aliens priests and started their own. And then there's the Swedish Church... so... I thought I'd start here with you guys first.
 

bucky

Ostrich
I don't know Latin :( All school taught me were industrious languages, like German.

There are absolutely zero Catholics and/or Orthodox priests where I live. The best is Lutherians who think the Swedish Church has strayed from the path with their female and LGBTQP+Aliens priests and started their own. And then there's the Swedish Church... so... I thought I'd start here with you guys first.

My wife's Catholic parish uses this version of the Bible in English:

The New Jerusalem Bible

Although in the description it says "It is also less gender-specific, when this approach does not do violence to the original" which seems like a bit of a red flag. Maybe you'll just have to do a little research on Catholic or Orthodox Bibles in English. I like the KJV, myself.

Out of curiosity, I googled "Catholic Bible in Swedish" and didn't see much, although doing it in Swedish would probably yield better results. Or next time you're in Stockholm or Gothenburg, there must be some Catholic and Orthodox churches there.
 

typtre

Robin
My wife's Catholic parish uses this version of the Bible in English:

The New Jerusalem Bible

Although in the description it says "It is also less gender-specific, when this approach does not do violence to the original" which seems like a bit of a red flag.
Definitely sounds like a red flag.

They have thoroughly re vised everything. The biblical text is loftier, more literal, and less colloquial.

Not to keen on the broad "revised" term either, as for example how the "revised" version of Behold A Pale Horse had the entire chapter of "The Elders of Zion" revised out of it.

In one of the videos the guy compared KJV with "The Jerusalem Bible" so that or the New (like the one you linked) seems like good options.

Out of curiosity, I googled "Catholic Bible in Swedish" and didn't see much, although doing it in Swedish would probably yield better results. Or next time you're in Stockholm or Gothenburg, there must be some Catholic and Orthodox churches there.
Sweden is the land of the Cucks though so I'm hesitant to turn to "Authority/Church", which seems to be a corruption in the first place. And with the Pope and Popes through recent history being literal Demons, anything Catholic is like deep water with no shore to me.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Definitely sounds like a red flag.

They have thoroughly re vised everything. The biblical text is loftier, more literal, and less colloquial.

Not to keen on the broad "revised" term either, as for example how the "revised" version of Behold A Pale Horse had the entire chapter of "The Elders of Zion" revised out of it.

In one of the videos the guy compared KJV with "The Jerusalem Bible" so that or the New (like the one you linked) seems like good options.


Sweden is the land of the Cucks though so I'm hesitant to turn to "Authority/Church", which seems to be a corruption in the first place. And with the Pope and Popes through recent history being literal Demons, anything Catholic is like deep water with no shore to me.
Ah, maybe Orthodox is your best bet then. I thought you were just specifically trying to avoid anything Protestant. You might be right about priests in Sweden, Orthodox or Catholic. When I lived with my wife in her country in Central America, I found the priests there for the most part very "red pilled" because there's little chance of them getting in trouble for condemning things like homosexuality and feminism. They'd even sometimes preach against local people trying to emigrate to the US and Europe, telling them to stay in their own country and not chase material wealth by leaving. Now that we're back in the US, the priests here are much more cautious about saying politically incorrect things and mostly stick to safer topics like condemning abortion. Some of the Mexican priests are pretty much openly globalist and as likely to preach about "immigration reform" as they are anything having to do with actual Christianity.

I still think you'd be able to find good information searching online in Swedish though. If not, maybe some of the Orthodox members of RVF can recommend some good English translations.
 

ralfy

Robin
The Church wants translations that are accurate and that follow what's used in liturgy, etc. (e.g., "full of grace" and not "favored one"). The USCCB has agreed and will be coming up with a revision that will be approved by Vatican and can be used for personal study, catechism, and liturgy:


Maybe one day there will also be a Catholic edition of the NRSV-EU and an update of the RNJB that will do the same.

For India, I'm not sure about the status of the ESV-CE for liturgical purposes.

In summary, a good English language Bible might also be what's accurate (meaning, it uses updated scholarship), has an imprimatur, is approved by the Vatican for use in liturgy, and what's used (or will be used) in your region (for now, mostly older translations are used). That way, you have a translation that can be used for personal study, scholarship, and liturgy.
 

typtre

Robin
Ah, maybe Orthodox is your best bet then. I thought you were just specifically trying to avoid anything Protestant. You might be right about priests in Sweden, Orthodox or Catholic. When I lived with my wife in her country in Central America, I found the priests there for the most part very "red pilled" because there's little chance of them getting in trouble for condemning things like homosexuality and feminism. They'd even sometimes preach against local people trying to emigrate to the US and Europe, telling them to stay in their own country and not chase material wealth by leaving. Now that we're back in the US, the priests here are much more cautious about saying politically incorrect things and mostly stick to safer topics like condemning abortion. Some of the Mexican priests are pretty much openly globalist and as likely to preach about "immigration reform" as they are anything having to do with actual Christianity.

I still think you'd be able to find good information searching online in Swedish though. If not, maybe some of the Orthodox members of RVF can recommend some good English translations.
I'm just looking for the truest truth of the word, if there is such a thing left after history. For example, seems like Mr KJV changed the translation of the word Ekklesia (Believers chosen by Father GOD) to mean Church. To make the reader appeal to [State Authority]. Pure corruption of language in my mind.

I think as a whole Central America is a little more naturally based.
I guess the Swedish Church are one of the least based, since we are one of the most secular countries (and you Americans are now catching on) and we as a people are really herdlike, meaning we rarely change opinion but when we do it is done quickly throughout the entire country. For good and bad.
 
Avoid the NIV 2011 at the least. It is deliberately translated to be gender neutral in many areas. Therefore nullifying the word of God by changing meanings where they didn't exist before. Here is the Hyperlink:

NIV 2011 translation analysis

Specifically to push for women being in the Priesthood, Pastorships and so forth. As well as Patriarchal nature of the Old Testament Israelite society.
 

bucky

Ostrich
I'm just looking for the truest truth of the word, if there is such a thing left after history. For example, seems like Mr KJV changed the translation of the word Ekklesia (Believers chosen by Father GOD) to mean Church. To make the reader appeal to [State Authority]. Pure corruption of language in my mind.

I think as a whole Central America is a little more naturally based.
I guess the Swedish Church are one of the least based, since we are one of the most secular countries (and you Americans are now catching on) and we as a people are really herdlike, meaning we rarely change opinion but when we do it is done quickly throughout the entire country. For good and bad.
Interesting. Are there any translations that don't translate "Ekklesia" as "church"? My understanding is that it is the Greek word for church. If I type "church in greek" into Google, I get "Εκκλησία" which transliterates to "Ekklisía". Latin "ecclesia" surely comes from the same root or directly from the Greek, and Italian "chiesa" and Spanish "iglesia" certainly come from it.
 

typtre

Robin
Interesting. Are there any translations that don't translate "Ekklesia" as "church"? My understanding is that it is the Greek word for church. If I type "church in greek" into Google, I get "Εκκλησία" which transliterates to "Ekklisía". Latin "ecclesia" surely comes from the same root or directly from the Greek, and Italian "chiesa" and Spanish "iglesia" certainly come from it.
I was looking at this
I figure translating today will give the "latest" meaning, depending on dictionary or other source, just like buying the revised or New Bibles.
I sometimes feel like Orwell's 1984 where everything has been rewritten and falsified to the point where history has ceased to exist. Everything is what the Party says it is.
 
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