Best of the Anglosphere to settle in 2020?

How does US,UK,Aus,NZ and Canada compare in terms of settling down and how does one choose their place taking into account social life, working conditions, taxes and health insurances, comfort, safety, building a family or dating as a bachelor and finding the buzz/zest for life.

How does a 2nd tier city in US like Charlotte or Milwaukee compare to a Liverpool or Manchester to a Auckland or Ottawa?

As an early 30s guy from UK living in Europe for years in a co-orporate job I've grown to miss and appreciate the convenience of the Anglophone world, the efficiency in every walks of life starting from digital core banking to swift rational bureaucracy to interactive chatty outgoing people, easy to mingle and penetrate social circles.

As I get older just meeting friends and people who I can speak my native language to and share banter has become more important than meeting a gorgeous beauty from the patriarchal world.

Sure I would love to meet someone I can connect with and settle down with but I feel if I can have an interesting exciting social life with friends and activities and a nice apartment in a nice city than finding my life partner will come naturally.

Anyone else feel that way after long term living in countries where you are google translating official documents stuck in bureaucracy in a cold and reserved society and you change your accent and choose your words to be better understood?

Would you trade more exotic pastures for the comfort and ease of Anglosphere, if so what are some of the better cities and countries to do it?
 
My experience as a Kiwi so I'll weigh in:

I would say you're unlikely to find Kiwi friends in New Zealand cities. YMMV if you're very British/Kiwi culturally but it's standard for foreigners to not have Kiwi friends even if they try. IME Kiwi banks are amazing, government perhaps average, while most things are quite bad. Although not having a language barrier does help somewhat.

NZ is warm and friendly but you'll probably never have close friends on a deep level. And the social circles can't be penetrated. I also don't know what you mean by exciting social life, in general I've found more activities/hobbies overseas vs NZ. But we have good beaches.

For what it's worth, the NZ real estate bubble is big, you'll probably pay more than a comparable apartment/house in NZ cities than equivalent cities elsewhere. There's also not really a city scene in NZ.

Heard good things about 2nd tier American cities.
 

kel

Pelican
I lived in Melbourne, Australia for a while and loved it, but I was at a different place in my life. At the time it was affordable - you could rent a house with a garden for the price of a commieblock-style apartment in London or New York or probably even Sydney - and was chill. It felt like a place where you could live rather than just running the rat race and survive.

This was many years ago, it may have changed, and I'm sure it's more expensive because that's how things go.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
I would look at Perth, Australia. I think it'll be one of the last holdouts for Anglo culture and lifestyle.

Property prices are cheap (for the country), there are jobs, high wages, laid back lifestyle, lots of beaches, weather is perfect, no traffic (20min max drive to almost anything), good infrastructure, Aussies still drive the taxis (inc. women). I heard it's the most 'Anglo' capital city in Australia or even the world? (do your own research).

I think the potential is the in the large 2nd tier capital cities and large regionals. The places nobody has heard of. Also look to Adelaide, Brisbane and Hobart. Still right up there in the global livability indexes (I think Australia has 6 in the top 10, but everyone internally only thinks of Sydney and Melb). For regionals, Woolongong (2 hours south of Sydney), Newcastle, etc - those places. You will need to get partially used to more quiter country style life but these cities will still have everything (OK, so maybe you can't find a live rock gig on a Tuesday night).

Melbourne was fantastic 10 years ago but has pretty much fallen IMO - $800k for an good/average family house in the far outer burbs (40km away), Greens government, regular Soros funded protests (climate change, cancel Australia Day, etc), terror attacks, Sudanese gang violence and house invasions, city has been sold out to the 3rd world, immigrant takeover probably past the point of no return, 1 hour drive to anywhere, sardine packed overcrowded trains/trams. Sydney even worse.
 
PixelFree said:
I would look at Perth, Australia. I think it'll be one of the last holdouts for Anglo culture and lifestyle.

Property prices are cheap (for the country), there are jobs, high wages, laid back lifestyle, lots of beaches, weather is perfect, no traffic (20min max drive to almost anything), good infrastructure, Aussies still drive the taxis (inc. women). I heard it's the most 'Anglo' capital city in Australia or even the world? (do your own research).

I think the potential is the in the large 2nd tier capital cities and large regionals. The places nobody has heard of. Also look to Adelaide, Brisbane and Hobart. Still right up there in the global livability indexes (I think Australia has 6 in the top 10, but everyone internally only thinks of Sydney and Melb). For regionals, Woolongong (2 hours south of Sydney), Newcastle, etc - those places. You will need to get partially used to more quiter country style life but these cities will still have everything (OK, so maybe you can't find a live rock gig on a Tuesday night).

Melbourne was fantastic 10 years ago but has pretty much fallen IMO - $800k for an good/average family house in the far outer burbs (40km away), Greens government, regular Soros funded protests (climate change, cancel Australia Day, etc), terror attacks, Sudanese gang violence and house invasions, city has been sold out to the 3rd world, immigrant takeover probably past the point of no return, 1 hour drive to anywhere, sardine packed overcrowded trains/trams. Sydney even worse.
Good info. Could you expand on Perth / Western Australia a little? Its one of the few areas that has piqued my interest for permanent relocation.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
Some random facts:

It's the most isolated capital city in the world.
First class city in every way - great infrastructure, etc.
Had a big mining boom 6-10 years ago but has crashed since.
Very little Chinese/Indian community there (and it seems a pretty vocal opposition to it, with the "bogan/redneck" locals having seen the way Melbourne and Sydney have gone).
Weather is perfect, Winters days are Sunny and 19 deg Celsius.
Some of the worlds best beaches.
Lots of nature based family fun activities around (4WDing, camping, river activities (boating, skiing), hundreds of KMs of beach, etc).
Property prices have been flat since the crash, and are now good value (for Australia).
Lots of South African, Irish and British ex-pats. If you have no other family or friend links in Australia, it's the place to go to.
Some 20-30 year olds think it's a little too small and boring and prefer Melbourne, but to be a kid or to raise kids it's ideal.
Very relaxed lifestyle, very good work life balance with jobs (downside: shops don't open late and on Sundays, but overall I think it's better like this, you just need to be a bit more organised).
Good holiday access to Bali and SE Asia.
Huge national pride around Australia Day.
It's def becoming 'cooler' and hipper with Melbourne style cafes and so on.
Perhaps it can be compared to Texas ?? Unsure on that one.

What else do you want to know?
 
Thanks for the info!

Other than the British / Irish / South Africans, are there a lot of Mediterranean people there? I don't mean Arabs, but Italian / Greek / Spanish descent. I heard there were a lot of Greeks in Australia. Looking for something a bit closer to home to settle down with in the next few years once I get to where I'm going.

Would you recommend the skills shortage list for checking for a way to get in on a work visa to eventually get permanent residency? I have a technical background. I have a connection to Perth through some extended family but don't want to say too much here on a public forum.
 
Really interesting post. I'm British too, and travelled 6 continents, but the reality is, we just are so much closer in terms of mindset, values etc to US/Can/Aus/NZ than anywhere else. Aus is a place I love, and although I haven't been to Perth, I know lots of ex-pats who have gone there, and love it. Make the same kinds of comments as those above.

I also hear good things about Vancouver (too cold for me) and Texas, for what it's worth.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
MusicForThePiano said:
Other than the British / Irish / South Africans, are there a lot of Mediterranean people there? I don't mean Arabs, but Italian / Greek / Spanish descent. I heard there were a lot of Greeks in Australia. Looking for something a bit closer to home to settle down with in the next few years once I get to where I'm going.

Would you recommend the skills shortage list for checking for a way to get in on a work visa to eventually get permanent residency? I have a technical background. I have a connection to Perth through some extended family but don't want to say too much here on a public forum.
I am not so sure, I would say it's overwhelmingly Anglo, but in general other non-English speaking Europeans like Greeks and Italians have integrated very well into Australia over the last 40-50 years and are considered just about as Aussie as anybody else to most people. There were some initial tensions/integration friction but over time proved themselves to be hard workers who didn't ask for a hand out, share similar (Christian) values and have made good economic and cultural contributions to the country. Obviously you have your bad eggs/scammer ones but I'm generalising.

The large Australian Greek population is based in Melbourne (surprise fact: it's second only to Athens). Adelaide has a large Italian population and is also worth looking into, also makes the top 10 liveability lists, perfect weather, Norway level quality of life.

In regards to skills the state has a very diverse industry (contrary to popular opinion who think it's 100% mining) so anything really, although things to do with mining might have a faster path (Engineering, etc) as well as all the usual global in demand skills (nurses, doctors, teachers). You'd need to look at the government skill shortage websites.
 
summer2008 said:
Really interesting post. I'm British too, and travelled 6 continents, but the reality is, we just are so much closer in terms of mindset, values etc to US/Can/Aus/NZ than anywhere else. Aus is a place I love, and although I haven't been to Perth, I know lots of ex-pats who have gone there, and love it. Make the same kinds of comments as those above.

I also hear good things about Vancouver (too cold for me) and Texas, for what it's worth.
Curious what's close to NZ about your mindset. What exactly would you like about it? As a Kiwi but not ethnically white, I don't understand. Also wouldn't the US be quite different to Britain?
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
My limited knowledge is NZ was settled by a higher % of Scots than Australia.

This apparently explains higher number of Scottish named downs (Dunedin, etc) the Kiwi accent (which doesn't sound Scottish at all but certainly different to Australian).

To take a guess at what summer2008's means, it's a combination of many things such as the legal system, political system, education system, Christian values (don't steal, kill, cheat, forgiveness, 10 commandments stuff and even stuff we don't think about like not eating closed hoof or soft paw animals such as horses or cats come from this), how we like to live (little things like keeping shoes on inside the house vs the Russian, German or Asian culture of taking them off, cleanliness habits, what's considered rude vs not - burping/coughing/snorting/sneezing with or without covering/tissues/use of hankies), common language (English), sayings, how we treat/interact with our family/elders (which I would say Asian and Islander cultures are better here), average number of children, how we trade/barter (relates to level of trust within a society), power distances in the workplace (e.g. do we sit in the front seat or back seat in taxis, do we speak our mind to our boss or do we simply obey without question, would we have a beer with our boss or is this out of the question), what sports we like (if any), dating/courtship customs, marriage customs, etc etc. There are many many things here, I could go on forever.

It encompasses a lot of conscious and subconscious things we aren't even aware of that make us feel more comfortable and familiar.

Hope that helps.
 
That makes sense. For me as a Westernised Asian living in NZ, almost all of those things done the Kiwi way would've been foreign to me. The main exception being the English language. A few things Kiwis do I'm comfortable with that I'm not comfortable with the way non-Kiwis do, but also vice versa. But I can understand if you're Anglo at heart you'll be comfortable in NZ.

It makes sense that parents and other Kiwis would think I would feel foreign in another country but at home in NZ. It turned out not to be the case since I didn't integrate, but interesting.
 

cowboy

Sparrow
Found this thread interesting.

Given with all that has happened in the United States over the past 6 months, both New Zealand and Australia would be rated above the United States. Obviously, all anglosphere countries are controlled and manipulated by the same people. You will have deal with the same B.S. everywhere.

However, we are observing a rapid decline with the United States. The U.S. will be Brazil sooner rather than later. The racial driven instability and violent crime will not be as prevalent in NZ or Australia (at least from what I see). I personally know multiple conservative Americans looking to move their families to one of these countries. It’s interesting these guys mentioned Perth as well.
 

scotian

Crow
Gold Member
There are some nice second tier cities in Canada that a guy could live a fairly comfortable life in; Victoria, Ottawa, London and Halifax come to mind. They’re mostly government cities with large student populations, they’re reasonably affordable, safe and have enough people and activities to keep a guy entertained. The big cities are pretty nice too, although you’ll see more crime there and other problems like homelessness and drug addiction, it’s easily avoidable if you choose your neighborhood wisely. The biggest issue is the high cost of living, especially in Vancouver and Toronto.

Canada’s major selling point is it’s natural landscapes and easy access to outdoor activities, so I recommend a smaller city close to the ocean and/or mountains.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
Thank you for the info, Pixel. Perth has been a place I have been thinking about for a while now for the very reasons listed.
I forgot one huge reason. The women there are hotter. Very unusual thing, don't know why. The beach/outdoors lifestyle? Also more pleasant (slightly), over a city like Sydney, although past economic booms have created a few princesses.

Also, Perth has essentially zero connection to Australia's convict past. Some say this is why they are a bit more entrepreneurial over there.

FYI - Contrary to popular belief, only 10-15% of our population has any link back to convicts. The vast majority were settlers.

The biggest downside is it's a 4 hour flight to Melbourne, 4.5 hours to Sydney, or 5 hours to Brisbane. It really is very, very isolated. Perth is to Australia as Australia is to the world. Imagine if you had just a single city on the entire US West Coast, that was double the size of Salt Lake City. That's Perth.

Population 2.1M, 4th largest capital city in Australia.

OK, so now maybe I need to shut up about my plan B :)
 
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Speculation

Kingfisher
I've spent a fair chunk of my adult life in Perth so I feel that I need to comment here.

Perth is all the things PixelFree has said, but be aware that there is a huge amount of competition for attractive women in Perth. The city is a mining town in its roots. Women from around Australia tend to move to the cosmopolitan cities of Melbourne and Sydney, while men tend to move where the career opportunities are, which includes more frontier cities such as Perth and Darwin.

During the local mining boom which ended roughly 5 years ago, many tradesmen and engineers from around the nation and the world moved to Perth, exacerbating the already bad gender balance in the 20-40 age range. As has been noted in other posts on the old boards, there is a strong gym culture in Australia, and this combined with the heavy gender imbalance means that it is more difficult (but not impossible) to land an attractive girl. This has continued to the point where finding a long term mate was one of the major drives pushing me to leave Perth. I've had no problems meeting girls in Melbourne/Brisbane/Sydney or overseas, but for the above reasons my options were limited in Perth.

I would suggest that you don't move to Perth looking for a partner, but move there after you've already found one or when finding one is no longer your concern. I don't mean to come off as doomsaying, but after a lifetime traveling the world and years in the nightlife/single environment in Perth, I know of what I speak.

On top of this, Perth's culture (derived from its isolation) is very 'cliquey' where the locals already have long established social networks. I'm wildly generalising here, but people spend their weekends having BBQs with their mates who they have known from high school. Its hard to crack these social networks, not out of xenophobia (although there is a small amount of that), but benignly because people have enough friends and don't have the social free slots or time commitment to make new deep friendships.

All of that said, Perth's isolation breeds a robust culture that is one of the most resistant to the pozzing that has already infested Melbourne and Sydney. It is as far as I'm aware, one of the most resistant holdouts to progressive culture in the Anglosphere. The rot will spread there eventually, but where else are you really going to go to enjoy the benefits of Anglo culture in the decline?
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
I would suggest that you don't move to Perth looking for a partner, but move there after you've already found one or when finding one is no longer your concern. I don't mean to come off as doomsaying, but after a lifetime traveling the world and years in the nightlife/single environment in Perth, I know of what I speak.
Good comments, I agree.
 
Any opinions on the Isle of Man, Channel Islands, or Malta?

Isle of Man in particular seems decent if you are alright with a slower pace of living and can get past some of the island life surcharges. Low taxes, safe, nice scenery, and it's the largest geographically of all of the aforementioned with a fairly small population of around 90k. Malta in comparison has like 500-600k and is it about half the size of IoM.
 

vatuvei

Pigeon
Any opinions on the Isle of Man, Channel Islands, or Malta?

Isle of Man in particular seems decent if you are alright with a slower pace of living and can get past some of the island life surcharges. Low taxes, safe, nice scenery, and it's the largest geographically of all of the aforementioned with a fairly small population of around 90k. Malta in comparison has like 500-600k and is it about half the size of IoM.
I moved to Malta for the taxes mostly but there's other benefits: climate, beauty and a high turnover of attractive women (particularly young language students). Not ideal to stay forever but has direct flights to EE and Spain etc when you need to get away. Not affected badly by covid so one of the better places to wait this out imo.
 
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