Best place to settle down "off-grid"

Shedlight11

Sparrow
Woman
I know what Roosh says about running away and going off grid. I know it's only
a matter of time before this entire country goes to the gutter. I am fairly young and can pick up and go wherever. No children in the mix either.

I am near a large city and I cannot imagine raising children here.It's loud, noisy, dirty distracting, the people are rude, my neighbors are way too close for comfort and there's also more crime in my area recently.

I have been looking into settling down in an area where I can be most self sufficient with little to no reliance on the government. I also find peace in being in a quiet environment to connect with God. Medical freedom is also important to me, but it doesn't really matter because if I have children I plan to homeschool either way (God Willing)

Anyways, I am not sure where to even begin. I have been researching places, but weather seems to be a big issue. I do not want to settle down in Florida/Texas. I feel as though they are a ticking time bomb and I want to be away from where the masses are going.Plus Florida is known to have dirty water.

I feel like warm weather is ideal to grow food, but most off-grid areas are freezing and a greenhouse only means more reliance on the grid.

Any ideas or thoughts ?

I know there is a men's thread on this and I couldn't find a women's one. Sorry if there's already a thread on this.

Thank you and God Bless you all!
 
Depends on how much space you want/need between you and the city. If you want many 100s of miles, then, sure, the plains or mid west are the options. If you just want some acerage where you can have some peace & quiet, grow some food and set up to be ok when the power goes out, there are many more options, far enough from the city, but not completely isolated. The southern US, mid Atlantic are a good, climate wise, and there are many areas where you can be away from the clown world, but still close enough to use its resources.

If you've never lived off grid, I recommend you find a rural area where you can slowly get set up and gradually lower your dependency on the grid. We are about 30 miles from the nearest small city, and about 3 hours from Atlanta, GA (we're not in GA though). The nearest small town is only about 25 minutes away. A bad run of summer thunderstorms or a winter ice storm can take the power out for a week here, easily. We have went three weeks without grid power due to ice storms. I've had to take a jeep and a chainsaw to cut my way to the main road in order to go check on my parents before. Events like that, while nothing compared to truly living off grid, serve to help gauge our preparedness to make it in a real SHTF event.

Good luck!
 

Shedlight11

Sparrow
Woman
Depends on how much space you want/need between you and the city. If you want many 100s of miles, then, sure, the plains or mid west are the options. If you just want some acerage where you can have some peace & quiet, grow some food and set up to be ok when the power goes out, there are many more options, far enough from the city, but not completely isolated. The southern US, mid Atlantic are a good, climate wise, and there are many areas where you can be away from the clown world, but still close enough to use its resources.

If you've never lived off grid, I recommend you find a rural area where you can slowly get set up and gradually lower your dependency on the grid. We are about 30 miles from the nearest small city, and about 3 hours from Atlanta, GA (we're not in GA though). The nearest small town is only about 25 minutes away. A bad run of summer thunderstorms or a winter ice storm can take the power out for a week here, easily. We have went three weeks without grid power due to ice storms. I've had to take a jeep and a chainsaw to cut my way to the main road in order to go check on my parents before. Events like that, while nothing compared to truly living off grid, serve to help gauge our preparedness to make it in a real SHTF event.

Good luck!
Thank you for your input!!

God bless you!
 

Genevieve

Chicken
Woman
Best place is relative. I've been looking for the best place taking into account many factors for the last 5 years. Let me first recommend two great books that help you determine what lifestyle will be right for you.

How to Find Your Ideal Country Home: A Comprehensive Guide by Gene GeRue

Starting A New Life In Rural America: 21 Things You Need to Know Before You Make Your Move by Ragnar Benson

After reading these books, *most* people will find that they would fare better in a small town or on the outskirts of a small town (and they save themselves a lot of trouble too).

As far as states, that's not as clear cut. The first book goes into every state from many different aspects such as climate, water, geography, etc. You also have to take into account moving distance from your current place of residence. It's an undertaking. Flyover states are usually good, so try starting there. They do exclude Texas and Florida. There are no more best kept secrets that I know of, but Eastern Arizona is sort of one of them and seems as if it may fit the bill with what you are looking for. (Side note: You do need a good water filter in AZ because of mining causing high arsenic levels.) Masses probably won't go there because there are not a lot of amenities. Liberals won't do anything hard so if you are willing to put in hard work and with you being young, you have more options to make things work and you have less chance of running into them.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
While I have no desire to live off grid, I do enjoy watching other’s videos on the subject. You can glean a lot of info by paying attention. I’m sure there are also videos on what it really means to live self-sufficiently rather than the romanticized version. Long, long ago we tried it deep in Montana. One thing people there do is buy a tag and work out a bartering system for a hunter to kill an elk or deer for you.

Bushradical has a good YouTube channel on the subject. He and his wife have homesteaded 3 times, building their stuff right off the land. It’s a really interesting channel with a lot of info, and he’s very encouraging. He’s got a video on the truth about homesteading along with one on how to find land.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
Plenty of trees for fuel and building, reasonable walking distance to a reliable natural water source (preferably running), landscape conducive to shelter from the elements AND from visual detection.

Hot/cold climate is a trade-off for growing vs. preservation. Hard winters are nature's chest freezer.
 

MrFreezy

Sparrow
Bushradical has a good YouTube channel on the subject.
Like his stuff too. Very much enjoyed his 1 h long road trip video about his trip through Canada to Alaska. He is a hands on guy too. Shows how a manual tire machine works. How to install a hand driven well pump. Good stuff.
I like yourself very much like the idea. But here in northern Ontario you would basically put your life on the line, in winter for example. I myself plan to move out to a small town in the next years but more because cost of living is cheaper and its safer but completely off grid...that s rough especially if you have two little girls.
 
I know what Roosh says about running away and going off grid. I know it's only
a matter of time before this entire country goes to the gutter. I am fairly young and can pick up and go wherever. No children in the mix either.

I am near a large city and I cannot imagine raising children here.It's loud, noisy, dirty distracting, the people are rude, my neighbors are way too close for comfort and there's also more crime in my area recently.

I have been looking into settling down in an area where I can be most self sufficient with little to no reliance on the government. I also find peace in being in a quiet environment to connect with God. Medical freedom is also important to me, but it doesn't really matter because if I have children I plan to homeschool either way (God Willing)

Anyways, I am not sure where to even begin. I have been researching places, but weather seems to be a big issue. I do not want to settle down in Florida/Texas. I feel as though they are a ticking time bomb and I want to be away from where the masses are going.Plus Florida is known to have dirty water.

I feel like warm weather is ideal to grow food, but most off-grid areas are freezing and a greenhouse only means more reliance on the grid.

Any ideas or thoughts ?

I know there is a men's thread on this and I couldn't find a women's one. Sorry if there's already a thread on this.

Thank you and God Bless you all!


There are a lot of pros and cons and trade-offs.

I'm more off-grid than on-grid. You can be on-grid with water supply, but off-grid with internet access.

One doesn't actually need too much land, especially if the land is flat. You can have a lot of "stuff" in 1 acre or less, you don't need "40 acres and a mule" to feed a small family. You can supplement your diet on a lot less.

Growing one's own food: I've done it, it is a lot more work than many people think. There is a lot more "set up" in the beginning than many people think. Even if you buy a planting bed from a set, you still have to put it together. Doing that easier with two (or more) people. Do you have a watering system in mind? That's another thing that needs to be set up. There's a lot you'll need to budget for that you're probably not even thinking of...

Look in the region, and be sure to check out which agricultural Zone it is, that will tell you what you can and cannot grow.

The plants you're going to grow: Before you eat them, they have to grow. While they're growing, you still need to eat, and you will be buying groceries, so plan for that, having a source of income for that will help out a lot.

Things like carrots and potatoes are great and easy to start with. "If you can grow potatoes, you'll never starve. If you can't grow potatoes... Then maybe you deserve to starve." They're really that easy to grow. You'll want to get a potato-bag to grow them, adding more and more soil as they grow so they can produce more potatoes until late fall when you harvest them.

Basil is a great herb to make homemade pesto, they like it sunny, hot and dry with a lot of watering. Rosemary is another great herb that will grow like a weed, easy to transplant cuttings, and it goes great in spaghetti sauce.

Other things like asparagus takes a little bit more time before you can harvest it, like a couple years to get "established" when you plant it, and there's a limited "window" in the springtime when you can harvest it, and then you should let it grow until next year.

Fig trees and other orchard plants are good, especially "long term" plants. Don't be afraid to prune them back. (Figs are my favorite to be honest...) You put a stick with roots in the ground in winter, and by late summer you get figs. "How to Prune Fruit Trees" first published in 1944, but there's a 2013 reprint is what my old professor would call, "An oldie but goodie." It's probably the best book on pruning fruit trees I've come across.

Grapes will keep coming back year after year, don't be afraid to prune them either.

Look long and hard at the location you want to buy/move it. "The lay of the land" of the specific spot is IMPORTANT. In my experience, flatter is better. If you don't believe me, haul 40 pounds of soil up a hill, and then get back to me.

Don't be like those idiots who recently announced they're starting their own "racial commune" at 10,000 in Colorado with starting a farm up there. Drive up any mountain pass to 10,000 feet in the Sierra Nevadas or the Rockies, and count up the farms.

Take into account that help like an ambulance or law enforcement may be 20 or more minutes away, you might need to go to the hospital, and likewise have an equally-long drive. Take that into account. If the winter is really bad, help might not be coming. "We cannot get through the snow to help you..." Think about that too.

Livestock:

Chickens are pretty easy with some practice, they tend to "do their own thing." And the "know" how to lay eggs, just leave them alone, and feed them, and clean their coop/run.

Pigs: Gloucestershire old spot is the breed I've used most often. When they're small, they're cute, when they're fully grown, they can be a pain in the behind if you're not careful. They're pretty "hardy" and can handle the cold better than us humans in my experience. Wear boots when you're around pigs. Trust me, you don't want a 200 lbs pig stepping on your foot... Learn from my stupidity on that one, please!

Also on this point, slaughtering them, it's pretty hard, and I've hired people to do it for me...

If you're not prepared for that, don't get pigs. I've been "low-energy" for a day or so after slaughtering pigs. On the plus side, the meat is delicious, especially if you add corn for the last couple weeks before they're slaughtered to "fatten them up" the fat "sorta melts" when you cook the meat and it tastes great.

I could probably write a small book on this subject.
 
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Anywhere in the U.S. is risky. Given what's happened to independent communities in the past, it's far safer to head to a livable third world country with fertile ground and agricultural opportunities. I'd highly recommend checking out Finca Bayano as it lays out in detail the argument for this case. It is a ten year project in the making with lots of opportunity. However, the required commitment is much higher, and you need to invest lots of time before hand.
 

Vigilant

Kingfisher
Woman
Anywhere in the U.S. is risky. Given what's happened to independent communities in the past, it's far safer to head to a livable third world country with fertile ground and agricultural opportunities. I'd highly recommend checking out Finca Bayano as it lays out in detail the argument for this case. It is a ten year project in the making with lots of opportunity. However, the required commitment is much higher, and you need to invest lots of time before hand.
That's a beneficial website, thank you.

FYI: https://faithandheritage.com/2016/0...ittle-ice-age-help-save-western-civilization/
 

scotian

Peacock
Gold Member
A place where you won't die from exposure to the elements in case of emergency like a power grid failure, preferably one with a hippy barter culture with a long growing season and the ability to own guns. In Canada we're basically limited to coastal British Columbia but you Yanks are spoiled with options
 

Vigilant

Kingfisher
Woman
A place where you won't die from exposure to the elements in case of emergency like a power grid failure, preferably one with a hippy barter culture with a long growing season and the ability to own guns. In Canada we're basically limited to coastal British Columbia but you Yanks are spoiled with options
And yes barter, because...

 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
From what I understand, people in the US wanting to get "off the grid" without leaving the country head to Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, Arizona, or New Mexico. Alaska appears to be the most remote, but of course you'll have to be able to deal with severe winters there. I'm not sure if the growing season is long enough there to be self-supporting from gardening, but I understand the hunting and fishing is more-than-adequate. I've heard that so many single men go to Alaska and Montana to wilderness homestead that the locals are accustomed to it, and once they see that you're not a complete weirdo, will usually try to help you get settled-in. Wyoming is a little more cliquish, from what I've been told, and there may not be as much available land there because of the large ranches.

Kona probably knows more about it than I do, but another option is Hawaii, especially on the Big Island.
 

Shedlight11

Sparrow
Woman
Best place is relative. I've been looking for the best place taking into account many factors for the last 5 years. Let me first recommend two great books that help you determine what lifestyle will be right for you.

How to Find Your Ideal Country Home: A Comprehensive Guide by Gene GeRue

Starting A New Life In Rural America: 21 Things You Need to Know Before You Make Your Move by Ragnar Benson

After reading these books, *most* people will find that they would fare better in a small town or on the outskirts of a small town (and they save themselves a lot of trouble too).

As far as states, that's not as clear cut. The first book goes into every state from many different aspects such as climate, water, geography, etc. You also have to take into account moving distance from your current place of residence. It's an undertaking. Flyover states are usually good, so try starting there. They do exclude Texas and Florida. There are no more best kept secrets that I know of, but Eastern Arizona is sort of one of them and seems as if it may fit the bill with what you are looking for. (Side note: You do need a good water filter in AZ because of mining causing high arsenic levels.) Masses probably won't go there because there are not a lot of amenities. Liberals won't do anything hard so if you are willing to put in hard work and with you being young, you have more options to make things work and you have less chance of running into them.
THANK YOU!
 

Shedlight11

Sparrow
Woman
From what I understand, people in the US wanting to get "off the grid" without leaving the country head to Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, Arizona, or New Mexico. Alaska appears to be the most remote, but of course you'll have to be able to deal with severe winters there. I'm not sure if the growing season is long enough there to be self-supporting from gardening, but I understand the hunting and fishing is more-than-adequate. I've heard that so many single men go to Alaska and Montana to wilderness homestead that the locals are accustomed to it, and once they see that you're not a complete weirdo, will usually try to help you get settled-in. Wyoming is a little more cliquish, from what I've been told, and there may not be as much available land there because of the large ranches.

Kona probably knows more about it than I do, but another option is Hawaii, especially on the Big Island.
I am looking into Montana.

Have a few friends in Hawaii. Optimal for growing, but DEF a financial strain because its super expensive. Thanks for your input. It is greatly appreciated.
 

Shedlight11

Sparrow
Woman
Anywhere in the U.S. is risky. Given what's happened to independent communities in the past, it's far safer to head to a livable third world country with fertile ground and agricultural opportunities. I'd highly recommend checking out Finca Bayano as it lays out in detail the argument for this case. It is a ten year project in the making with lots of opportunity. However, the required commitment is much higher, and you need to invest lots of time before hand.
Thank you for this.
 

Shedlight11

Sparrow
Woman
There are a lot of pros and cons and trade-offs.

I'm more off-grid than on-grid. You can be on-grid with water supply, but off-grid with internet access.

One doesn't actually need too much land, especially if the land is flat. You can have a lot of "stuff" in 1 acre or less, you don't need "40 acres and a mule" to feed a small family. You can supplement your diet on a lot less.

Growing one's own food: I've done it, it is a lot more work than many people think. There is a lot more "set up" in the beginning than many people think. Even if you buy a planting bed from a set, you still have to put it together. Doing that easier with two (or more) people. Do you have a watering system in mind? That's another thing that needs to be set up. There's a lot you'll need to budget for that you're probably not even thinking of...

Look in the region, and be sure to check out which agricultural Zone it is, that will tell you what you can and cannot grow.

The plants you're going to grow: Before you eat them, they have to grow. While they're growing, you still need to eat, and you will be buying groceries, so plan for that, having a source of income for that will help out a lot.

Things like carrots and potatoes are great and easy to start with. "If you can grow potatoes, you'll never starve. If you can't grow potatoes... Then maybe you deserve to starve." They're really that easy to grow. You'll want to get a potato-bag to grow them, adding more and more soil as they grow so they can produce more potatoes until late fall when you harvest them.

Basil is a great herb to make homemade pesto, they like it sunny, hot and dry with a lot of watering. Rosemary is another great herb that will grow like a weed, easy to transplant cuttings, and it goes great in spaghetti sauce.

Other things like asparagus takes a little bit more time before you can harvest it, like a couple years to get "established" when you plant it, and there's a limited "window" in the springtime when you can harvest it, and then you should let it grow until next year.

Fig trees and other orchard plants are good, especially "long term" plants. Don't be afraid to prune them back. (Figs are my favorite to be honest...) You put a stick with roots in the ground in winter, and by late summer you get figs. "How to Prune Fruit Trees" first published in 1944, but there's a 2013 reprint is what my old professor would call, "An oldie but goodie." It's probably the best book on pruning fruit trees I've come across.

Grapes will keep coming back year after year, don't be afraid to prune them either.

Look long and hard at the location you want to buy/move it. "The lay of the land" of the specific spot is IMPORTANT. In my experience, flatter is better. If you don't believe me, haul 40 pounds of soil up a hill, and then get back to me.

Don't be like those idiots who recently announced they're starting their own "racial commune" at 10,000 in Colorado with starting a farm up there. Drive up any mountain pass to 10,000 feet in the Sierra Nevadas or the Rockies, and count up the farms.

Take into account that help like an ambulance or law enforcement may be 20 or more minutes away, you might need to go to the hospital, and likewise have an equally-long drive. Take that into account. If the winter is really bad, help might not be coming. "We cannot get through the snow to help you..." Think about that too.

Livestock:

Chickens are pretty easy with some practice, they tend to "do their own thing." And the "know" how to lay eggs, just leave them alone, and feed them, and clean their coop/run.

Pigs: Gloucestershire old spot is the breed I've used most often. When they're small, they're cute, when they're fully grown, they can be a pain in the behind if you're not careful. They're pretty "hardy" and can handle the cold better than us humans in my experience. Wear boots when you're around pigs. Trust me, you don't want a 200 lbs pig stepping on your foot... Learn from my stupidity on that one, please!

Also on this point, slaughtering them, it's pretty hard, and I've hired people to do it for me...

If you're not prepared for that, don't get pigs. I've been "low-energy" for a day or so after slaughtering pigs. On the plus side, the meat is delicious, especially if you add corn for the last couple weeks before they're slaughtered to "fatten them up" the fat "sorta melts" when you cook the meat and it tastes great.

I could probably write a small book on this subject.
There are a lot of great points here. I was thinking of being more off than on grid, but in case of emergency and what not switching completely off if needed.

I was thinking about collecting rain water for emergency use, but implementing it more often than not, this way I always have access if needed.

You bring up GREAT points regarding medical attention that I did not even think about.

THANK YOU!
 
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