Best way to quickly heal knee injury?

MarshalZhukov

Sparrow
Catholic
If i am having knee pain, I will get a sled and pull it. When you're able to....

This is a natural way to build up hamstings and glutes also, which will take shearing force off your knee.
This sounds like some solid advice. I was told that weak hamstrings and glutes with stronger quads was causing an imbalance that was causing the pain.

I used bpc-157 and TB-500 and it healed my patellar tendonitis quite swiftly. On the other hand, I also have chondromalacia and I heard Pentosan Polysulphate has the ability to regenerate cartilage. Buying it soon.
I believe patellar tendonitis is the issue in question. I have this issue in both knees. The left knee is feeling much better, while progress in the right is lagging behind a bit since I started physical therapy, though I have seen major flexibility gains in the right knee. as well.

Absolutely do NOT do this unless you are wanting to schedule surgery.
...
I told the surgeon that I really didn't want my knee cut unless there was no other choice, and what alternatives were there. He paused and said, well I guess you could try 6 weeks of physical therapy. 2 months later I was water skiing. No surgery, just 6 physical therapy sessions at $60 a piece.
...
Be wary of the medical industrial complex insisting you need lots of invasive treatments. Just find out what the damage is and go from there. And anyone else reading this: TAKE CARE OF YOUR KNEES. I believe them to be the weakest point of the human body, and the hardest to heal.
Sound advice. I am going to the physical therapist twice a week now. I have much increased flexibility and stability as I am walking around. I am optimistic the psychical therapy will work.
 

droughtmeat

Kingfisher
Catholic
I believe patellar tendonitis is the issue in question. I have this issue in both knees. The left knee is feeling much better, while progress in the right is lagging behind a bit since I started physical therapy, though I have seen major flexibility gains in the right knee. as well.
If you have patellar tendonitis, your issue MIGHT just be mechanics and knee valgus.

I had patellar tendonitis for about 4.5 years while playing basketball semi professionally (about 4-5 practices a week, plus a game each weekend - just adding this so that you can understand the workload). Sometimes it would get so bad that I would wake up at night cause of the pain. Sitting with my legs at a 90 degree angle was tough too (flying, going to the cinema, driving a car etc.).

Anyway, I went to multiple doctors, got insoles and knee support etc. but none of it helped. I continued squatting and working out my legs because that mitigated the pain to a certain degree. Then I found out about knee valgus. I'm not talking about being knock kneed or some severe cases, I just mean situations where under heavy stress (heavy squats, jumping) or repetitive light stress (jogging, walking) your knees cave in or "buckle". That creates a sheering force on the patellar with causes pain.

This video describes it pretty well and adds some exercises.


I personally was able to cure 4.5 years of patellar pain in just 2 weeks with this exercise right here:


After 2 weeks I went from not being able to dunk a basketball to being able to dunk in games with defenders around me (because my issue was pain, not athleticism, since I was still squatting and stuff despite the pain). I continued to do the exercise about 3 times a week for about 6 months. Now I only feel mild general knee pain if I exercise for say 6-8 hours a day multiple days in a row, for example on a long weekend.
 

eradicator

Peacock
Agnostic
Gold Member
I am now visiting a sports physical therapist, and in less than a week of doing the recommended exercises I am seeing significant improvement. I was told I do not have a serious injury, but more of a muscular imbalance that was leading to knee strain. I was given exercises to strengthen the leg muscles in a more balanced manner and stretch the tendons. Thanks for the advice all!
My suggestion would have been to see a physical therapist, which you’ve done .
 

SebastianReal

Pigeon
Catholic
In terms of supplementation: Curcumin, Fish Oil, Bromelain, Pine Bark Extract, Glucosamine, Chondratin, MSM, and Collagen/Gelatin have all been shown to be effective against joint pain. You can get nearly all of those supplements for pretty cheap too. I have read some interesting scientific literature on hydrogen water reducing tendon and ligament pain/injuries, but supplementing it is pretty esoteric and expensive for the time being.

I would also look into a lectin-free diet. There have been some pretty promising studies of that dietary strategy reducing joint pain.
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Great to hear you are seeing a physical therapist. Just keep in mind, a physical therapist knows how to *fix* certain problems, but they may not know exactly what your underlying problem is. If you don't get better, I'd visit an actual joint / orthopedic / sports *doctor* (not a surgeon) and have them diagnose the actual problem. In my case it required a physical inspection followed by an MRI scan to confirm. Just don't accept the doctor's treatment plan (probably surgery). Take the diagnosis back to your physical therapist and proceed from there.

I credit my physical therapist with saving my life!
 

Revolting Truth

 
Banned
Orthodox
I have been looking around for some good advice. I recently hurt my knee, recovered some, and re-injured it. I am quite sure nothing is broken. The doctor i have ( I am in USA and you know how the doctors situation is out here) is not of much use. They simply say rest the knee. and take NSAIDs ( non steroidal anti inflamatory drugs). I have done some research online, and it seems using the NSAID drugs is not recommended. It is also advised to exercise the knee in a manner that does not put weight on it. How soon should I start doing re-hab exersizes, and how often should I do them? I fear that if I rest too heavily, my legs will weaken and make the recovery even longer. Right now I can walk around the house more or less fine, though I start to feel discomfort if I stand for too long. Should I make myself do some rehab exercises even if it hurts ?

thanks guys, I am quite clueless when it comes to medical issues ( I am en engineer/mechanic)
Contact a good , reputable orthopedic knee surgeon. The surgeon would request the relevant scans - and MRI scan will be crucial- to determine what the problem exactly is with your knee.

Be advised that if you really have a bone/joint problem, physiotherapy alone would not help. MY advice in general - be careful with Physiotherapist- plenty of them are arrogant and will try to push you to do exercises that cause you more harm than good.
Let your own body be your guide : try to remain active if you can but do not do any activity/exercises than cause you pain.
On the other hand: if you find a good orthopedic surgeon, it can save your life. Don't worry: they would only suggest an operation if they feel the potential benefits greatly outweigh a potential risk. Orthopedic surgery is one of the few remaining areas of modern medicine that still make positive difference in people's lives.
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
if you find a good orthopedic surgeon, it can save your life. Don't worry: they would only suggest an operation if they feel the potential benefits greatly outweigh a potential risk. Orthopedic surgery is one of the few remaining areas of modern medicine that still make positive difference in people's lives.
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way in the American health care system, which operates under a "fee for service" payment scheme, where monies are only earned based on the type of treatments given (the US is basically alone in the world for this, at least among first world nations).

It is true that "you get what you pay for" which is why I don't necessarily blame the doctors--offer a scheme where they make $10,000 by doing a surgery and $100 by saying nah, you look fine, and you will get a whole, whole lot of $10,000 surgeries. Sure, you could try going somewhere like the Cleveland Clinic, where the doctors are paid salaries and their income is not affected by the treatment they offer you, or you could do as I do and go abroad for medical tourism, which isn't an option right now due to covid, but the best bet is to see a sports medicine doctor who is NOT a surgeon. I can't stress this enough. It would be laughable to look at stats of how many surgeons told their patients "you don't need surgery."

The surgeon I visited, I later found out a family member worked for him in the past, and he would perform sometimes 10 surgeries a day, and treated his staff poorly. It was a literal money making machine. Again I fault him slightly, but if you offer someone the ability to do ten $10,000 jobs in a day, they will usually find a way to do it. Kind of like how if you build a lot of private prisons, you will soon have a whole lot of prisoners. Bad incentives create disasterous consequences.

In my case, the orthopedic non-surgeon doctor was adamant that I needed surgery, and of course the surgeon agreed, so you can't even take the non-surgeon's word as gospel, but at least you can get a clear diagnosis of what your specific problem is and what precisely is torn / damaged and go from there. In my case when I pressed the surgeon he said well I guess you could try physical therapy first and that was all I needed. *Please* do not risk an unnecessary joint surgery.
 

PolishCalifornian

Robin
Catholic
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way in the American health care system, which operates under a "fee for service" payment scheme, where monies are only earned based on the type of treatments given (the US is basically alone in the world for this, at least among first world nations).

It is true that "you get what you pay for" which is why I don't necessarily blame the doctors--offer a scheme where they make $10,000 by doing a surgery and $100 by saying nah, you look fine, and you will get a whole, whole lot of $10,000 surgeries. Sure, you could try going somewhere like the Cleveland Clinic, where the doctors are paid salaries and their income is not affected by the treatment they offer you, or you could do as I do and go abroad for medical tourism, which isn't an option right now due to covid, but the best bet is to see a sports medicine doctor who is NOT a surgeon. I can't stress this enough. It would be laughable to look at stats of how many surgeons told their patients "you don't need surgery."

The surgeon I visited, I later found out a family member worked for him in the past, and he would perform sometimes 10 surgeries a day, and treated his staff poorly. It was a literal money making machine. Again I fault him slightly, but if you offer someone the ability to do ten $10,000 jobs in a day, they will usually find a way to do it. Kind of like how if you build a lot of private prisons, you will soon have a whole lot of prisoners. Bad incentives create disasterous consequences.

In my case, the orthopedic non-surgeon doctor was adamant that I needed surgery, and of course the surgeon agreed, so you can't even take the non-surgeon's word as gospel, but at least you can get a clear diagnosis of what your specific problem is and what precisely is torn / damaged and go from there. In my case when I pressed the surgeon he said well I guess you could try physical therapy first and that was all I needed. *Please* do not risk an unnecessary joint surgery.
Amen, any honest surgeon will tell you that surgery could either have no effect or make things worse as often as it "fixes" something. I would try out 10 different physical therapists before contemplating surgery. I've been blessed to find one that has helped me more than the half dozen doctors and hospital therapists I have seen for my various ailments. I've learned that the apparent cause of your problems is not always the actual issue, knee pain for example can be caused by thigh tightness that needs to be stretched, cupped (silicone massaging therapy, can be done on yourself) and cold laser therapy, among others.
 

MarshalZhukov

Sparrow
Catholic
I personally was able to cure 4.5 years of patellar pain in just 2 weeks with this exercise right here:


After 2 weeks I went from not being able to dunk a basketball to being able to dunk in games with defenders around me (because my issue was pain, not athleticism, since I was still squatting and stuff despite the pain). I continued to do the exercise about 3 times a week for about 6 months. Now I only feel mild general knee pain if I exercise for say 6-8 hours a day multiple days in a row, for example on a long weekend.
The physical therapist prescribed just that exercise! About a month and a half later, I am doing much better! The exersizes given have an emphasis on developing the glutes and hamstrings. These have included bulgarian split squats, lunges, and regular squats done on a balance pad of sorts. I am going up and down multiple flights of stairs quite normally lately. On some days I would still feel some pain and felt like skipping the phsyical therapy appointment , but thankfully I did not skip the sessions. There seems to be a small amount of pain you have to live with while doing the recovery exercises.

glad i did not see a knee surgeon for this one!
 
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hedonist

Kingfisher
Other Christian
The physical therapist prescribed just that exercise! About a month and a half later, I am doing much better! The exersizes given have an emphasis on developing the glutes and hamstrings. These have included bulgarian split squats, lunges, and regular squats done on a balance pad of sorts. I am going up and down multiple flights of stairs quite normally lately. On some days I would still feel some pain and felt like skipping the phsyical therapy appointment , but thankfully I did not skip the sessions. There seems to be a small amount of pain you have to live with while doing the recovery exercises.

glad i did not see a knee surgeon for this one!
I tried one recently where you stand on a band with your knees slightly bent and you pull it up to form a rectangle and you crab walk slowly and slightly.....its brutal on the glutes!
 

frankunderwood

Pigeon
Protestant
If no one has mentioned it yet, look into "Knees over Toes Guy" on YouTube. There is also a thread about him here on the forum.

I have recently experienced that my knees actually hurt less after I did some long very low intensity jogging of 100 minutes in the 60% to 70% HRmax zone. The knee pain was spurred on because I have gone a bit overboard with working out since the new year.

Also my right knee clicks when bending it to 90 degrees. There is some tendon in there that skips along the bone. This might be because of an old injury, because I have hurt this knee in the past. However I also suspect that it might be because of tightness in my hips and legs causing tendon to be pulled along as I squat. Being more flexible surly can't hurt and if there is a problem with your gate I would think it would help a lot.
 
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