Black market solutions to maintaining pre-COVID19 freedoms

Which states of Mexico are those? How do you see Tanzania in 2-3 years?
I must have gotten confused, reviewing I see even no states in Mexico maintain with +/- 10% levels of Jan 1 - Feb 28 levels of movement.

Nicaragua data looks promising. Most if not all of the country, capital included, seems to be at or within a good margin of pre covid movement levels. In a lot of areas people are spending even less time at home than pre covid. Ortega is very anti covid too. Unfortunately like most of Latin America it looks like they love wearing masks, but Nicaragua never had a lockdown... borders open but PCR test required...

I couldn't tell you the first thing about Tanzania, never been there - no idea.

I only like rural living and need 100% food independence which puts Moscow or SPB out of question. To me these ar crowded hellholes anyway. If things hit the fan,even in Moscow one would be fair game for all kinds of criminals, any moment. And the police is one with them, they're all corrupt there and work with cartels. I was robbed by ambulance crew in the 90s there and told not to report to the cops because I'd be a goner then. Seriously, anyone who thinks of moving to Russia permanently, should learn a bit about Black Realtors, for example. Lots of people were disappeared... Places like Chelyabinsk are just lawsless and I'd be much more worried about being murdered by criminals there than about any lockdown or vaccine, even.

Latin America, yes, been getting expeinsive and when I checked house and land prices in places like Paraguay and Argentina last year, they seemed to be grossly overpriced, with pricing levels approaching European (these were not favelas, though....I'm sure favelas and plywood shacks are more affordable)
Yeah... unfortunately once you leave the police states crime is a fact of life, comes as natural as the rain. That's why I emphasized places with a strong private security sector. Crime should be prepared for but I don't think it should stop you. But I agree in general about Russia & would say mostly the same about Belarus.

If you're living in rural areas you'll either need to embed local peasants on your land, eat dinner with them, let your kids play with theirs, go to church with them, etc so all the local gangsters know to leave you alone. I know a lot of people who've done this in Colombia, Brazil, etc & it works. Or move to a private security colony. Or variations of this. What you can't do is move by yourself or in a small group to rural Africa, Latin America, etc. Never ends well for foreigners.
 

aynrus

Kingfisher
B
I must have gotten confused, reviewing I see even no states in Mexico maintain with +/- 10% levels of Jan 1 - Feb 28 levels of movement.

Nicaragua data looks promising. Most if not all of the country, capital included, seems to be at or within a good margin of pre covid movement levels. In a lot of areas people are spending even less time at home than pre covid. Ortega is very anti covid too. Unfortunately like most of Latin America it looks like they love wearing masks, but Nicaragua never had a lockdown... borders open but PCR test required...

I couldn't tell you the first thing about Tanzania, never been there - no idea.


Yeah... unfortunately once you leave the police states crime is a fact of life, comes as natural as the rain. That's why I emphasized places with a strong private security sector. Crime should be prepared for but I don't think it should stop you. But I agree in general about Russia & would say mostly the same about Belarus.

If you're living in rural areas you'll either need to embed local peasants on your land, eat dinner with them, let your kids play with theirs, go to church with them, etc so all the local gangsters know to leave you alone. I know a lot of people who've done this in Colombia, Brazil, etc & it works. Or move to a private security colony. Or variations of this. What you can't do is move by yourself or in a small group to rural Africa, Latin America, etc. Never ends well for foreigners.
Same about Belarus?
My father grew up in Belarus and lived half of his life in Russia, while vising Belarus a lot too, and he's an American as well.
He considers Belarus much safer country than Russia and advised me to only stay in Belarus and never in Russia. Russia is not the word I can mention to my family anymore, they know what's going on there.

Private security...yeah, if you have money for it. One can live in private security area in Russia too, they're called "cottage settlements", коттеджные поселки. But I don't want to live in gated community, it's another way of being in prison. That's why I don't want to live in crime-ridden countries,
where criminals effectively imprison me in my daily life.
I'm used to freedom, for me this means sleeping outside out in the nature and not worrying about things, not having my hand on the gun at all times and gun within reach.... yes one can find rural areas like that all over the world, actually. Just need to know places.

One thing you can't mingle with locals everywhere rural....they can kill you in your own home because they often think all Westerners are rich. In Russia, a lot of that thinking. I hear how in Russia people get killed in their rural homes for $10 on a regular basis. Another thing in Russia....there used to be a lot of avtopodstava....when they set you up for an accident when you're driving and make you pay or rob the car. In Russia, one needs to have eyes on their back, literally. I did extensive search on rural areas in Russia and talked to many who live in villages...there's no place reasonably safe from crime there. Russia is too deeply entrenched in corruption and rule of criminals.
 
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It was 90% locked down? How willing are the public to obey this again?
No, the other way around, the measurement is pre covid baseline movement levels, 0 is normal, so -10% would mean that it's 90% precovid movement levels or "90% normal". Hardcore locked down areas seem to get to around -60% (France, Italy, etc) to -80% (Philippines). So I was trying to choose areas that are no less than 90% normal, or -10%. At least in terms of entertainment & workplace most of Mexico is around -30% currently.
 

presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
The sources are all media reports, social media and personal discussions, from Russia, which you can not read because you don't know the language.
And which little birdie told you that?
I was robbed by ambulance crew in the 90s there and told not to report to the cops because I'd be a goner then.
I was also robbed by an ambulance crew after a serious accident on the way to the ER. In the US.

When you find the Promised Land on earth, let me know.
 

presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
Everything that you mentioned tells me that. Because you'd have known what was involved in Moscow region lockdown if you knew the langauge and kept up with events there.
That's true I don't keep up with events there and your information is useful.

I was basing my comment on experience of people I still know there, not what the officials say or what the news says.

Seems not many people took any restrictions that seriously because it seemed to have little impact on people's everyday lives there.

Same thing happening here in the US. You see countless articles about 'patrols' in NYC checking out of town-ers and bridge and tunnel folks being checked, needing negative tests to enter, etc. Haven't see that myself and I was in the city a few days ago. Walked around Oculus without a mask on indoors. Cops didn't bat an eye.
 

aynrus

Kingfisher
That's true I don't keep up with events there and your information is useful.

I was basing my comment on experience of people I still know there, not what the officials say or what the news says.

Seems not many people took any restrictions that seriously because it seemed to have little impact on people's everyday lives there.

Same thing happening here in the US. You see countless articles about 'patrols' in NYC checking out of town-ers and bridge and tunnel folks being checked, needing negative tests to enter, etc. Haven't see that myself and I was in the city a few days ago. Walked around WTC without a mask on indoors. Cops didn't bat an eye.
Unfortunately, a lot of infromation about real situation on the ground doesn't make it into Anglo-Sphere (media, social media, youtube).
Lockdown in Moscow was brutal, so were the tracking measures. People did take restrictions - there were roadblocks and police checking papers at the entrances to subway, also taxi, Uber, Yandex taxi drivers were ordered to check permits and people had been refused boarding taxis.
A lot of people posted blogs about being turned around or locked down with tracking. There're plenty of videos of lines waiting to get past checkpoints into a subway.

I believe it was worse than in NY, at least in terms of tracking (were there roadblocks and police checkpoints at subway entraces in NYC in spring? I don't remember any reports of that) - I haven't heard of people accused of having potential covid (such as ones with common cold, flu, who simply traveled) being tracked day and night by a smartphone app, asking you to make selfies multiple times a day; also they did location tracking. I thought NYC did not fall this low back in spring.
 

presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
Unfortunately, a lot of infromation about real situation on the ground doesn't make it into Anglo-Sphere (media, social media, youtube).
Lockdown in Moscow was brutal, so were the tracking measures. People did take restrictions - there were roadblocks and police checking papers at the entrances to subway, also taxi, Uber, Yandex taxi drivers were ordered to check permits and people had been refused boarding taxis.
I believe it was worse than in NY, at least in terms of tracking (were there roadblocks and police checkpoints at subway entraces in NYC?) - I haven't heard of people accused of having potential covid (such as ones with common cold, flu, who simply traveled) being tracked day and night by a smartphone app, asking you to make selfies multiple times a day; also they did location tracking. I thought NYC did not fall this low back in spring.
It is curious to compare and contrast reactions/tolerances of people who may have a history of operating under totalitarianism (Russia) vs those who are don't.

There doesn't seem to be a lot of correlation - I guess modern people on the whole are just too soft and comfortable worldwide to push back - regardless of geography.
 
B

Same about Belarus?
My father grew up in Belarus and lived half of his life in Russia, while vising Belarus a lot too, and he's an American as well.
He considers Belarus much safer country than Russia and advised me to only stay in Belarus and never in Russia. Russia is not the word I can mention to my family anymore, they know what's going on there.

Private security...yeah, if you have money for it. One can live in private security area in Russia too, they're called "cottage settlements", коттеджные поселки. But I don't want to live in gated community, it's another way of being in prison. That's why I don't want to live in crime-ridden countries,
where criminals effectively imprison me in my daily life.
I'm used to freedom, for me this means sleeping outside out in the nature and not worrying about things, not having my hand on the gun at all times and gun within reach.... yes one can find rural areas like that all over the world, actually. Just need to know places.

One thing you can't mingle with locals everywhere rural....they can kill you in your own home because they often think all Westerners are rich. In Russia, a lot of that thinking. I hear how in Russia people get killed in their rural homes for $10 on a regular basis. Another thing in Russia....there used to be a lot of avtopodstava....when they set you up for an accident when you're driving and make you pay or rob the car. In Russia, one needs to have eyes on their back, literally. I did extensive search on rural areas in Russia and talked to many who live in villages...there's no place reasonably safe from crime there. Russia is too deeply entrenched in corruption and rule of criminals.
All that stuff happens in the US too... outside the suburbs US is probably more wild than Russia corpse for corpse. Read some narco blogs to learn about the real US. No place anywhere on Earth is safe from risk, just depends on which risks you want to deal with.

I can deal with poverty motivated crime in Moldova or Brazil or wherever, I can't deal with some nutjob from the Marines who wants to keep me safe by vaccinating me & shutting down my business. In Belarus there's little to no street crime but it's a police state, they hand away 15 day prison terms like it's candy there. I met a kid the other day fleeing Belarus, yes he was a little masked hippie dipshit, but prison for protesting? They don't even do that in Venezuela or Cuba. And You'll likely have to go through interrogation on arrival at the airport & be monitored after that - it's not normal right now for Westerners. I know a guy who got some weird "you are being monitored by the minister of something" type text after he arrived. Lukashenko even said the other day he'd be open to Putin annexing Belarus, so I view the 2 as one state despite what historically biased locals may say.

Again, you could go to Belarus and probably be completely fine, but I'd rather roll the dice with everyday bandits than omon or kgb in Minsk.
 

aynrus

Kingfisher
In Russia, there're a lot of anti-scamdemic and anti-mask blogs and people who don't believe in any of it.
I think there might be more mask resistance than in the States, because of less respect for rules and laws in general.
But many who lived in the USSR and are now living in the US believe that "the virus" is real and embrace masks and lockdowns. I thought it was a nostalgic return to the good old times for them...but apparently this is just a universal human nature.
 

aynrus

Kingfisher
All that stuff happens in the US too... outside the suburbs US is probably more wild than Russia corpse for corpse. Read some narco blogs to learn about the real US. No place anywhere on Earth is safe from risk, just depends on which risks you want to deal with.

No way... I have to strongly, 100% disagree with that. Not even remotely close.
I live in rural America and travel all over it for many years. It's not wild out there at all, not remotely anything like in Russia, not even close.
I've been here for 25 years.
Guns keep rural America very safe.
I had camped all over rural America, pretty much, and slept under the stars, in a tent or not locking my door, everywhere -in campgrounds, in the woods, in the desert, on private properties, by remote roads. Hardly ever worried.
Rural America is very, very safe.
In Russia, I'd have to fear for my life all the time.
By the way, in Russia you can not really live on a large property, like in America, without guards and big, mean dogs.
You know, in Russia deadly force in self-defense isn't really allowed....it lands one in prison for murder. In Russia, if you're a in a rural home, there's no concept of boundaries and local drunks can just come, rob you, kill you and burn the house, it happens in villages all the time. Stealing and tresspassing are also considered normal, a legacy of Communism. There's nothing remotely like that in America.

Do you even realize how much higher Russian murder rate is than the US one? In the US, rural is a lot safer than urban, and in Russia....it's exactly the opposite. Russian murder rates are about 2.5 higher than offical published (and this is the conclusion by the office of Russian Attorney General). Murders are routinely written up as "falls" and "heart attacks" due to insane corruption.
Puh-lease.....rural America is the safest place. For your life's sake avoid Russian villages unless you know well where you're going, one's car might get jumped/chased by the local gang just for driving into one. They can force the car off the road and ta-da.

Guns and the right to use deadly force is what makes the difference. Another thing is severe sentences for murder, rape, etc in the US. In Russia, a sentence for murder(s) is pretty short, mostly under 15 years. And if someone punched you in the face...it's not even a crime anymore, was de-criminalized/administrative fine only.

I doubt that Belarus would agree to Putin annexing it :)...
I mean Lukashenko just recently arrested a few guys who were accused of being Russian operatives. More of a concern for me would be Lukashenko losing power to that Soros-paid "protest movement".
 
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presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
I'd be inclined to agree with that. Anecdotally, outside of one incident involving a the murder of a high profile French kid in Moscow involving kavkaz immigrants in Medvedkovo region, I didn't come across that much insanity in Moscow region. I had a few run-ins with other immigrant cabbies - one trying to rob me another tried to drive me clear out of the city entirely for God knows what but I got in his face and managed to get the car turned around. But the people in general are not out looking for trouble and I was surprised I didn't observe any more issues than I did.

Rural America, outside of meth and opioid issues, still has some horse sense and thanks the 2a, they are able to keep it that way for the most part.

Urban America? That's another story. I know someone who's a detective in a mid-tier US city which regularly shows up on the top-10 'most dangerous US cities'. He gets shot at by gang bangers and narcos and on a regular basis.

Leadership doesn't care either way. No bail in NYC allows some to rob multiple banks a day, in between trips to the police station for some paper work.
 

aynrus

Kingfisher
Meth and opioid people mostly keep to themselves....I've been to Appalachia's hardest-hit areas. Even those are WAY safer than almost anything in rural Russia, I can assure of that. I've been to big reservations, that's probably where worst US rural crime is....WAY safer than rural Russia.
In short, in rural America I can sleep like a baby with unlocked door or in my tent almost anywhere... crimnals here know I can blow their brains off if they tried anything and the law would be on my side. Human life isn't worth much in rural Russia, frankly...
 

Deepdiver

Crow
Gold Member
I live in New Hampshire the Live Free or Die ultimate constitutional concealed carry state similar to Maine and Vermont which are hunting states and bear and moose hunters as well as whitetail buck hunters need large caliber sidearms to administer kill shots lest they be gored or mauled but a not yet dead big game animal.

Unlike Maine and Vermont if stopped by LEOs in NH you do NOT have to inform them you are carrying - but it is a good idea to have your license and registration handy with your hands on the steering wheel if stopped not to scare the hell out of young police officers as they like to go home safe at the end of their shifts. I tend to wear a Sub Vets hat and they often thank me for my service, Been startled by a few fully tatted bikers who come up and shake my hand (before covid) doing same.

With Trump taking the handcuffs off of local police forces they have really cracked down hard on the LatinX/Mex drug dealers - I used to see needles every week during the end of the Obama Biden cartels era but now have only seen one in the past 6 months... Latinos now all workers and driving new trucks. Have heard of some snowbirds homes being stripped of old copper wire and plumbing by morons - new homes mostly using plastic flex piping. Once constitutional concealed-carry was passed a few years ago by Gov Chris Sununu (R) have not heard about this as much.

Ironically NH uses Dominion and we had a red wave in the State House but US Senator and Congress went Dems as well as the State went Biden over Trump - clearly an issue. Gov Sununu (R) was reelected by a large margin - go figure.
 

andy dufresne

Kingfisher
Ironically NH uses Dominion and we had a red wave in the State House but US Senator and Congress went Dems as well as the State went Biden over Trump - clearly an issue. Gov Sununu (R) was reelected by a large margin - go figure.
Trade yah Phil Scott for Sununu any day. He's a 'Republican' who proudly voted for Biden. Unreal.
 

username

Ostrich
Gold Member
Private security...yeah, if you have money for it. One can live in private security area in Russia too, they're called "cottage settlements", коттеджные поселки. But I don't want to live in gated community, it's another way of being in prison. That's why I don't want to live in crime-ridden countries, where criminals effectively imprison me in my daily life.

The United States is moving pretty quickly in the direction of needing "settlements" like that as well. Especially after the BLM looting and ANTIFA destruction that has resulted in practically zero prosecutions. Plus no bail release, prosecutors paid to not charge crimes, and criminals using their race as a get out of jail free card.

I'm leaning towards a "settlement" in US that is a bunch of acres, good access to water to grow food, area to raise chickens, cows, and pigs, while being a good distance from a large city but not too far, say 2 to 4 hour range. Surround the settlement with a ditch, berm, and fence with two or three secure entry points. Have several likeminded friends and family be part of the enclave.
 

budoslavic

Owl
Gold Member
As test-result protocols for travel are becoming more high-tech, however, it’s unlikely that many travelers would be able to travel with a manipulated document.

Keep an eye on CommonPass, which is working with the World Economic Forum to build a high-tech mobile application as part of The Great Reset agenda for travelers. I wouldn't be surprised if CommonPass get hammered by hackers and/or black market groups.

CommonPass framework process diagram (from left-to-right).

CommonPass-Overview.jpg


CommonPass promotional video.


CommonPass​

For global travel and trade to return to pre-pandemic levels, travelers will need a secure and verifiable way to document their health status as they travel and cross borders. Countries will need to be able to trust that a traveller’s record of a COVID PCR test or vaccination administered in another country is valid. Countries will also need the flexibility to update their health screening entry requirements as the pandemic evolves and science progresses. Airlines, airports and other travel industry stakeholders will need the same.

The Commons Project together with The World Economic Forum is working to initiate the CommonPass framework to address those challenges.

CommonPass is currently in trials. Click here to be notified when it is publicly available.

How it works.​

The CommonPass framework will allow individuals to access their lab results and vaccination records, and consent to have that information used to validate their COVID status without revealing any other underlying personal health information. Lab results and vaccination records can be accessed through existing health data systems, national or local registries or personal digital health records (Apple Health for iOS, CommonHealth for Android). Apple Health and CommonHealth let individuals store their health records securely and privately on their phones, entirely under their control.

The framework will assess whether the individual’s lab test results or vaccination records (1) come from a trusted source, and (2) satisfy the health screening requirements of the country they want to enter. The framework delivers a simple yes/no answer as to whether the individual meets the current entry criteria, but the underlying health information stays in the individual’s control. The framework is being designed such that it can be accessed directly through other apps and services.


Edit. From the Meet the Trustees page:

The Commons Project was established with support from the Rockefeller Foundation.

 
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