Books/authors in danger of being censored

Ah_Tibor

Robin
Woman
I have mixed feelings about the Dr. Seuss thing. I collect a lot of children's books, and it isn't unusual for reissues to have new illustrations or editing. The Ramona Quimby books were updated to have bike helmets, computers etc., to make their world of kids roaming neighborhoods and mostly stay-at-home moms a little less alien. (There is a divide between the early books where Ramona's family is comfortably middle-class vs. the 70s recession where the mom works, the kids stay after school at a neighbor's house, and money is clearly tight [a lot of which was based on the author's experiences during the Great Depression but is familiar to anyone who grew up poor/working class]. Beverly Cleary is still alive at 104 at a nursing home in Oregon. She actually had smallpox as a kid because her parents sent her to go play with a kid they thought had chicken pox. Her memoirs are interesting.)

I was also very much into the Oz stories as a kid, and the company (Books of Wonder) that specialized in close reproductions of the originals would excise offending illustrations or slap disclaimers at the beginning. There's all kinds of stuff that wouldn't fly today-- like who really finds vaudeville "ethnic" humor funny (drunk Irishman et al), or confusing written dialect? L. Frank Baum had a very low regard for religious people (one of his non-Oz books throws a remark about how fish being fished believe they've "gone to glory"), great unwashed immigrants, Native Americans, blacks, pretty much anyone who held back "progress." His mother-in-law was Matilda Gage, a prominent feminist (though he also makes fun of feminists in one of his books with an all-female army that gets nothing done and a leader who sits around eating candy, and later marries a man with a lot of cows and is very happy). Another plot point is the leader of Oz is enchanted into and raised as a boy before being turned back into her rightful girl ruler self. I don't think it's hard *at all* to see how the American and British progressives of yesteryear (Baum was also a theosophist) are the direct ancestors of the kookiness we see today.

Anyway, sorry for the sperginess; I guess my point is that I could see the Dr. Seuss people changing the offending illustrations for new editions, but ebay banning accounts that sell the old ones plus this large scale penitencr over books no one reads (I've only read one or two of those) is where the problems lie.
 

Seadog

Kingfisher
I picked up a hardcover first edition of Dr Seuss goes to war, which has all the political cartoons from the WW2 era, some colorful depictions of Germans and Japanese - every stereotype you can think of is there. Bought it with in hours of the announcement for about $50, and yesterday when I checked amazon, it was just under $1000. Now there are ones for $250, but still. Anyways, abebooks.com is a pretty good source for books, lots of private sellers there.
 

uncledick

Woodpecker
I've been on a physical media buying spree for the last year. I haven't read 1/10th of the books I bought and have not watched all the movies either. The idea is that i have another 40-50 years of life to get through all of it eventually. The next 5 years might be the last chance to buy HP Lovecraft books, Mel Gibson movies, Old James Bond flicks, Robert E Howard tales, E Michael Jones, Robert Heinlein sci-fi works, John Wayne westerns, older politically incorrect movies like ZULU and A boy and his Dog, non-pozzed history books written by the likes of Gibbon, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn works, Christian writers like CS. Lewis and GK Chesterton. I've been getting art collection books with Hi-Def photos of masterwork paintings from the likes of Michelangelo, Da Vinci etc. just incase the wokesters start to literally destroy and burn western history/Christianity in its eternity.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Woodpecker
It is important to separate the principle from the specific books being cancelled.

In principle, is it bad to cancel Dr. Seuss? Yes, of course.

However, I'm not opposed to cancelling in general: if we could destroy all feminist literature tomorrow, then that would be good. Cancelling subversion is good.

In this case, it's Dr. Seuss. His books are not classics, and the guy was a typical dumb Boomer who cheated on his wife and caused her to commit suicide.

If they try to cancel the Bible or Shakespeare, then I'd be concerned. But Dr. Seuss? Meh.
 

stugatz

Pelican
It is important to separate the principle from the specific books being cancelled.

In principle, is it bad to cancel Dr. Seuss? Yes, of course.

However, I'm not opposed to cancelling in general: if we could destroy all feminist literature tomorrow, then that would be good. Cancelling subversion is good.

In this case, it's Dr. Seuss. His books are not classics, and the guy was a typical dumb Boomer who cheated on his wife and caused her to commit suicide.

If they try to cancel the Bible or Shakespeare, then I'd be concerned. But Dr. Seuss? Meh.
A “typical dumb boomer” born in 1904?
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
For young men, fiction against tyranny:

C. S. Lewis — Space Trilogy
Richard Adams — Watership Down
Walter Wangerin Jr. — The Book of the Dunn Cow
George Orwell — Animal Farm
Aldous Huxley — Brave New World
Malcolm Muggeridge — Winter in Moscow
A Tale of Two Cities — Charles Dickens
The White Company — Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Heiland — Franklin Sanders
The Scottish Chiefs — Jane Porter
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
The Great Siege: Malta 1565, by Ernle Bradford
 

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
I've been on a physical media buying spree for the last year. I haven't read 1/10th of the books I bought and have not watched all the movies either. The idea is that i have another 40-50 years of life to get through all of it eventually. The next 5 years might be the last chance to buy HP Lovecraft books, Mel Gibson movies, Old James Bond flicks, Robert E Howard tales, E Michael Jones, Robert Heinlein sci-fi works, John Wayne westerns, older politically incorrect movies like ZULU and A boy and his Dog, non-pozzed history books written by the likes of Gibbon, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn works, Christian writers like CS. Lewis and GK Chesterton. I've been getting art collection books with Hi-Def photos of masterwork paintings from the likes of Michelangelo, Da Vinci etc. just incase the wokesters start to literally destroy and burn western history/Christianity in its eternity.
This is my thought exactly. I'm not like in love with Dr Seuss or anything but it's the principal of the matter and the same people who want the books unpublished are the ones who want to get rid of all "problematic" books and rewrite history to make the new State a perfect godless raceless, heritageless utopia.
It is important to separate the principle from the specific books being cancelled.

In principle, is it bad to cancel Dr. Seuss? Yes, of course.

However, I'm not opposed to cancelling in general: if we could destroy all feminist literature tomorrow, then that would be good. Cancelling subversion is good.

In this case, it's Dr. Seuss. His books are not classics, and the guy was a typical dumb Boomer who cheated on his wife and caused her to commit suicide.

If they try to cancel the Bible or Shakespeare, then I'd be concerned. But Dr. Seuss? Meh.

Even if you dislike Seuss you can see the slippery slope of banning "offensive" things. Seuss was actually a progressive (and the things he did to his wife was true but that wasn't reflected in his writings) so while its ironic he is getting the chopping block the same mentality and types that are going after him will go after other "problematic" things too. While I can see where people are coming from with removing the Confederate flag from places- after all they lost the war, you saw that the SECOND they did that they then moved on to Columbus, then there were people removing GRANT and LINCOLN (unironically! this happened in Portland, Seattle and probably other places). Father San Junipero was removed in Southern CA because of Spanish Missions. A pioneer that said something deemed offensive 150 years ago was removed/vandalized at University of Oregon. You absolutetely can't capitulate to this crowd. It's the same Soros funded crowd that believe they're doing it for the minorities but really they're going after Western culture.
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
They Were White and They Were Slaves: The Untold History of the Enslavement of Whites in Early America by Michael Hoffman.

"This remarkable, pioneering history book traces the suppressed record of the slave trade in Whites, hundreds of thousands of whom were kidnapped, chained, whipped and worked to death in colonial America and industrial Britain.
Michael A. Hoffman makes a compelling case for the fact that millions of American whites alive today are also descendants of slaves, the white slaves."

I highly recommend this book, but suggest one buys it from the author's website rather. Mature children should read it, and would likely be grateful for their lives in this generation after reading it.
 

Sherman

Ostrich
I would suggest buying videos of the older cartoons if you can get them. Like Warner Brothers, e.g. Bugs Bunny, Donald Duck, Porky Pig, etc., and Rocky & Bullwinkle, Mr. Peabody and Sherman, etc. These cartoons were intelligent and red pilled. You can get them for your children to watch. It will stimulate their intelligence more than the cartoons out today. The way things are going now, it is just a matter of time before they are banned for some stupid reason.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I would suggest buying videos of the older cartoons if you can get them. Like Warner Brothers, e.g. Bugs Bunny, Donald Duck, Porky Pig, etc., and Rocky & Bullwinkle, Mr. Peabody and Sherman, etc. These cartoons were intelligent and red pilled. You can get them for your children to watch. It will stimulate their intelligence more than the cartoons out today. The way things are going now, it is just a matter of time before they are banned for some stupid reason.
The old X-Men cartoons have a lot of Christian undertones that would never be aired on children’s prImetime tv today. Last night, we watched the “Nightcrawler” episode (s4 ep1) and they literally end up in a monastery and Christians are portrayed in an *extremely* positive light. And guess what? Wolverine becomes a Christian!
 
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stugatz

Pelican
Honestly, even the toons from my own childhood - Batman the Animated Series, Dexter's Lab, Samurai Jack, Johnny Bravo (ESPECIALLY Johnny Bravo) may be in danger at some point. (The older Looney Tunes kind of goes without saying, honestly - thankfully, they were all over the networks when I was a kid. I'm not sure where they were taken off the air, but I heard of it happening even in the 1990s.)

I guess some of the best of what Adult Swim aired in the early aughts is worth adding to this list, too.

Cripes, I'm going to have to buy a ton of media. I've already got a year-by-year list going of movies I want physical copies of, and it's well over 1000. (Thankfully for all of you, I look all the way back to 1915 when I think of film - so the rest of you in this thread won't have this headache.)

EDIT: This makes me think of a pretty historically important movie from 1927 - The Jazz Singer. It was the first talkie, and is probably on the chopping block because of scenes of Al Jolson in blackface. This is one I'm in no great hurry to track down, because I actually pretty intensely dislike the movie and it's not even a full talkie! It's a silent film with some talking scenes thrown in there, and I felt cheated when watching it in film history. The Neil Diamond remake from 1980 is at least unintentionally funny.
 
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Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
Honestly, even the toons from my own childhood - Batman the Animated Series, Dexter's Lab, Samurai Jack, Johnny Bravo (ESPECIALLY Johnny Bravo) may be in danger at some point. (The older Looney Tunes kind of goes without saying, honestly - thankfully, they were all over the networks when I was a kid. I'm not sure where they were taken off the air, but I heard of it happening even in the 1990s.)

I guess some of the best of what Adult Swim aired in the early aughts is worth adding to this list, too.

Cripes, I'm going to have to buy a ton of media. I've already got a year-by-year list going of movies I want physical copies of, and it's well over 1000. (Thankfully for all of you, I look all the way back to 1915 when I think of film - so the rest of you in this thread won't have this headache.)

EDIT: This makes me think of a pretty historically important movie from 1927 - The Jazz Singer. It was the first talkie, and is probably on the chopping block because of scenes of Al Jolson in blackface. This is one I'm in no great hurry to track down, because I actually pretty intensely dislike the movie and it's not even a full talkie! It's a silent film with some talking scenes thrown in there, and I felt cheated when watching it in film history. The Neil Diamond remake from 1980 is at least unintentionally funny.
Perhaps you could start a Worthwhile Classic Movies thread?
 
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