Books you've read over 1000 pages

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I wanted to start a thread for the big books we've read. Here are mine...

The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit by E Michael Jones
The Gulag Archipelago by Alexandr Solzhenitsyn (all three volumes)
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky (depends on the edition and typeface if it passes 1000)
The Bible

Two big books I'm currently reading...

The Prologue of Ohrid (two volumes) - a book on the daily lives of the Saints, so I only read a few pages each day over the course of a year.

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - Tolstoy's epic on the Napoleonic wars.
 

HatTrick

Chicken
"The Washing of the Spears" is a history book about South Africa. I had no particular interest in South Africa but this book was leftover at a book sale and I got it free. It starts with Europeans sailing around the Cape of Good Hope and ends with the war against the Zulus. It reads like an incredible adventure. I can't recommend it enough. The explorers and warriors of just a couple of hundred years ago were so tough. They had to be. They should be an inspiration to us.

It was first published in 1965 so there is no woke nonsense. There are so many good old history books and biographies. I don't bother reading anything published in the last 20 or 30 years.
 
La Recherche by Proust, der Mann Ohne Eigenschaften by Musil. I think, Doktor Faustus and der Zauberberg (Magic Mountain) could make a 1000 pages in modern font size. And of course the Bible and Reformed Dogmatics by Bavinck and Church Dogmatics by Barth. I have read a lot of Thomas' Summa, but not all of it.
 

Cartographer

Pelican
Gold Member
Atlas Shrugged - Ayn Rand

Peter the Great - Robert Massie
Fascinating history of the Tsar who modernized Russia.

Cryptonomicon - Neal Stephenson
Ok so this guy is a total woketard but his writing is as detailed and considered as Asimov's. (Technically only 918 pages)

Rise and fall of the Third Reich - William Shirer

Don Quixote - Miguel De Cervantes

The Divine Comedy - Dantes

The Arabian Nights

Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas

The Complete Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Also, I've read two Mark Twain anthologies that exceeded 1k but there were some duplicates.
 
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"The Washing of the Spears" is a history book about South Africa. I had no particular interest in South Africa but this book was leftover at a book sale and I got it free. It starts with Europeans sailing around the Cape of Good Hope and ends with the war against the Zulus. It reads like an incredible adventure. I can't recommend it enough. The explorers and warriors of just a couple of hundred years ago were so tough. They had to be. They should be an inspiration to us.

It was first published in 1965 so there is no woke nonsense. There are so many good old history books and biographies. I don't bother reading anything published in the last 20 or 30 years.
I checked that out from the library when I was about 14 years old and read it cover to cover. I’ve been trying to get my hands on a copy for years.
 

balybary

Pelican
The Crusades by Zoé Oldenbourg.

I have read it when I was a teenager. It depicts well the epic adventures and some of the phenomenal men who were fighting for power or for God.

 

Caractacus Potts

Woodpecker
Gold Member
War and Peace
Atlas Shrugged
Canterbury Tales It was a college textbook. I don't see it on duck duck go but it was about three inches thick. A lot of commentary
 

ChiefSinnerJohn

Pigeon
Orthodox
Father Seraphim Rose: His Life and Works by Hieromonk Damascene

Genesis, Creation, and Early Man: The Orthodox Christian Vision by Fr. Seraphim Rose

The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

In Progress:

The Bible

The Departure of the Soul According to the Teaching of the Orthodox Church

The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit (I have only read the introduction so far but I’m going to go ahead and include it)
 

ChiefSinnerJohn

Pigeon
Orthodox
"The Washing of the Spears" is a history book about South Africa. I had no particular interest in South Africa but this book was leftover at a book sale and I got it free. It starts with Europeans sailing around the Cape of Good Hope and ends with the war against the Zulus. It reads like an incredible adventure. I can't recommend it enough. The explorers and warriors of just a couple of hundred years ago were so tough. They had to be. They should be an inspiration to us.

It was first published in 1965 so there is no woke nonsense. There are so many good old history books and biographies. I don't bother reading anything published in the last 20 or 30 years.

I just ordered a copy from Abebooks. Thanks for the recommendation. Any other old history books or biographies that you would recommend?
 

stugatz

Pelican
The Stand (unabridged) and It by Stephen King are well over 1000 pages, I've read both a few times even if they're not the heaviest reads.

I also had to read Ian Kershaw's Hitler (one-volume version) in WWII History, which is about 1100 pages. (Off the top of my head, I believe the two-volume version is split into a 900 page and 1200 page volume.)

On my shelf and on my Kindle that I want to get around to - Infinite Jest, War and Peace, Les Miserables, The Bible.
 

HatTrick

Chicken
I just ordered a copy from Abebooks. Thanks for the recommendation. Any other old history books or biographies that you would recommend?

I could recommend dozens of good history books but as this is a thread about books longer than 1000 pages so I won't go into too much detail. Most books come in under 1000 pages. People think history doesn't matter but there is much to learn from things that happened in the past. So many inspiring men lived before us. They understood things we don't because they lived closer to death. They saw it all around them and it shaped their actions. When any disease or even a simple infection can end your life you tend to live with abandon. No one sat on their ass and played video games, there was stuff to be done.

A book from 2009 I am currently rereading is "The Fourth Part of the World." It is about the age of discovery and how Europeans discovered the whole world. Up until the middle ages people had very little knowledge of the world beyond their own region. They believed there was a Christian kingdom to the east of Europe ruled by someone called Prester John and explorers went looking for him. The book is full of fascinating stuff.
 
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