Brother Augustine

Mulato_Man_Gabe

Pigeon
Orthodox
This was a fantastic interview, very edifying. I think Fr. Turbo does a great job explaining the Orthodox stance on race/ethnicity. I'd love to hear more from him.
The race/ethnicity question has been a common topic as of late. How timely this interview is, and especially providential considering the ethnicity of Br. Augustine & Fr. Turbo. The Orthodox context was missing in the other recently published conversations on the web, but here God provides when there is a need, and the Lord is generous indeed.

Thanks for giving us this interview Br. Augustine. I shared the talk with some "African American" members of my parish and they loved the talk and related to it tremendously.
 

GuitarVH

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
This was a fantastic interview, very edifying. I think Fr. Turbo does a great job explaining the Orthodox stance on race/ethnicity. I'd love to hear more from him.

It was a great interview. His background in the punk scene was fascinating and his perspective on the race issue was at a very advanced level. A very unique individual.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
This was a fantastic interview, very edifying. I think Fr. Turbo does a great job explaining the Orthodox stance on race/ethnicity. I'd love to hear more from him.
I think you will, he is ready to be a public figure again.
The race/ethnicity question has been a common topic as of late. How timely this interview is, and especially providential considering the ethnicity of Br. Augustine & Fr. Turbo. The Orthodox context was missing in the other recently published conversations on the web, but here God provides when there is a need, and the Lord is generous indeed.

Thanks for giving us this interview Br. Augustine. I shared the talk with some "African American" members of my parish and they loved the talk and related to it tremendously.
Thank God! I am grateful to hear that our conversation is bearing fruit.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
@MichaelWitcoff

Is it okay to ask you questions here - if not, all good, please ignore.

I'm curious do all Saints/Church Fathers change their name in some way. You go by Brother Augustine, did you pick this yourself or was it given to you in some way? What is the Orthodox position on this and when did this start?
Great question! You receive a Christian name at your Baptism, to honor your patron Saint and mark him or her out as a special intercessor and role model for you. My Christian name is Augustine, and “Brother” is a title given to me when I was made an Oblate of St. Benedict. If someday I leave the Oblate program I will no longer have the prefix “Brother.” Hope that makes sense!
 

SimpleMan

Sparrow
Great question! You receive a Christian name at your Baptism, to honor your patron Saint and mark him or her out as a special intercessor and role model for you. My Christian name is Augustine, and “Brother” is a title given to me when I was made an Oblate of St. Benedict. If someday I leave the Oblate program I will no longer have the prefix “Brother.” Hope that makes sense!
Thank you, (edit) not about it being great, but for your response : )

I was hoping it happened at Baptism. It's a important event in my eyes and something I have yet to do.

How did you know who your Saint was ?
 
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SimpleMan

Sparrow
@MichaelWitcoff

Sorry, still curious. Has this been the process since the beginning of Orthodoxy? - ignore that if there was no beginning...just a constant, so to speak.

What is the earliest a Saint/Church Father you've read from (and can remember) describing this process?

Edit: Sorry edited. I need to slow down.
 
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MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
Thank you, (edit) not about it being great, but for your response : )

I was hoping it happened at Baptism. It's a important event in my eyes and something I have yet to do.

How did you know who your Saint was ?
As you become an inquirer, and then a catechumen, your priest (if he's a good priest) will start you on the path of reading the Lives of the Saints. As you pray to God and read those works, the idea is to find the Saint with whom you most closely resonate and who is the patron Saint, even more ideally, of the issues you yourself have worked on or need to work on most. The answer will reveal itself to you as you seek it.
 

SimpleMan

Sparrow
As you become an inquirer, and then a catechumen, your priest (if he's a good priest) will start you on the path of reading the Lives of the Saints. As you pray to God and read those works, the idea is to find the Saint with whom you most closely resonate and who is the patron Saint, even more ideally, of the issues you yourself have worked on or need to work on most. The answer will reveal itself to you as you seek it.

Thank you. As you grow closer to God and as a result, change as a Man, do you choose a new Saint when it does not resonate with you anymore?
 

Penitent

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Thank you. As you grow closer to God and as a result, change as a Man, do you choose a new Saint when it does not resonate with you anymore?
Only at your monastic tonsure would you have another opportunity to change your name and choose another Saint. Otherwise you will keep your name given at baptism. A good reason to hold your patron Saint in high regard.
 
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MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
Thank you. As you grow closer to God and as a result, change as a Man, do you choose a new Saint when it does not resonate with you anymore?
Life is short and I'm not sure if we have enough time to repent and change so completely that our Patron Saint no longer resonates with us. Most people will struggle with similar trials throughout their lives, though ideally they will overcome their passions to the degree that they are no longer habits - and ideally, be filled with such grace that the temptation is removed. You will certainly find new Saints, as you begin to read and learn about their lives, that reveal new aspects of the Way and the next steps you ought to focus on. And you should certainly ask for the intercessions of those Saints you resonate with most closely, but there will likely always be a special place in your heart and your life for the Saint whose name you take at Baptism.
 

SimpleMan

Sparrow
Life is short and I'm not sure if we have enough time to repent and change so completely that our Patron Saint no longer resonates with us. Most people will struggle with similar trials throughout their lives, though ideally they will overcome their passions to the degree that they are no longer habits - and ideally, be filled with such grace that the temptation is removed. You will certainly find new Saints, as you begin to read and learn about their lives, that reveal new aspects of the Way and the next steps you ought to focus on. And you should certainly ask for the intercessions of those Saints you resonate with most closely, but there will likely always be a special place in your heart and your life for the Saint whose name you take at Baptism.

Thanks.

Intercessions meaning we ask for their prayers?

The page I found that also questioned why we don't ask Angels to pray for us. Is that an approach within Orthodox?

Speaking of Angels, do Orthodox believe in Guardian Angels?

Thanks for taking your time with all this.
 

Mulato_Man_Gabe

Pigeon
Orthodox
Thanks.

Intercessions meaning we ask for their prayers?

The page I found that also questioned why we don't ask Angels to pray for us. Is that an approach within Orthodox?

Speaking of Angels, do Orthodox believe in Guardian Angels?

Thanks for taking your time with all this.

Guardian Angels are a big part of Orthodoxy, we each have one once we are received into the church. We pray a supplicatory canon to our guardian angel when preparing for the eucharist in the Russain Tradition. There's also an akathist to the guardian angel that's very, very good. I highly recommend it.


When it comes to angels in general, we can ask the Archangels to pray for us (there are 7 of them recognized in Orthodoxy). An archangel is my patron saint, so I try my best to pray to him often and with appropriate reverence.
 
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