Brother Augustine

SimpleMan

Sparrow
Guardian Angels are a big part of Orthodoxy, we each have one once we are received into the church. We pray a supplicatory canon to our guardian angel when preparing for the eucharist in the Russain Tradition. There's also an akathist to the guardian angel that's very, very good. I highly recommend it.


When it comes to angels in general, we can ask the Archangels to pray for us (there are 7 of them recognized in Orthodoxy). An archangel is my patron saint, so I try my best to pray to him often and with appropriate reverence.

Thanks.

So we don't have one until that point - this seems odd to me?

Not sure I can get that book, but it was nice learning what akathist means. Thanks.

Is there a more appropriate thread to ask these questions as I have others.
 

Penitent

Woodpecker
Orthodox
It could be that we have a guardian angel from birth. I don't think there is a clear dogmatic teaching on this point. Perhaps we are just joined in a special way to our angel when we join the church.
 

Magnus Stout

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Just wanted to chime in and say I enjoyed your talk with Fr. Heers. Lots of good and practical advice about the Royal Path. I also thought the father was a good example of how to be critical with love when referring to the Covidian heresy in the Church.

It is also good to see Godly men providing solid online resources during these times. Perhaps this phenomena ties into the hopefulness you discussed with him. By way of example, 10 or 15 years ago many of us were more concerned with hedonistic pursuits. Now, many more are looking into the fundamentals of the faith.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Good to see that you're diving into the works of the elite Michael. You mentioned that you're not aware yet too much of the transhumanist agenda, I can advice you to look into Ray Kurzweil as a leading source on this topic. He has a book called ''the singularity is near''. I haven't read it yet but as I gather this is one of the core transhumanist works available. Also you can look at Julian Huxley (Aldous' brother) and his essay Transhumanism, as he coined the term.
 

Brebelle3

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
New interview with a Mormon convert to Orthodoxy, with a focus on Joseph Smith and his religion’s fundamental tenets:
I appreciated watching this.

I was raised Mormon from birth, baptized at 8, and just days before my mission calling ran as far away from the cult as I could.

Tomorrow, on Thanksgiving, I'll be surrounded by dozens of Mormons, as my dad and his eight brothers and sisters are all Mormon. Their kids, all Mormon. Their kids kids, Mormon.

But I'll stand tall knowing that I've come home to the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.

Good work brother Augustine
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
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This has been widely shared.
 

lskdfjldsf

Pelican
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
@MichaelWitcoff You mentioned faithless Jews in the quote above. Did you see any similar imperatives among religious Jews? The Talmud is quoted often within the right, not just for blasphemies against Christ I'd rather not describe, but also for detailing religious justifications to harm Gentiles and rule them.

Curious what your perspective is. I notice secular Jews behave one way out of ethnic interests (even subconsciously), and a much smaller segment of Jews behaving identically for religious reasons.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
@MichaelWitcoff You mentioned faithless Jews in the quote above. Did you see any similar imperatives among religious Jews? The Talmud is quoted often within the right, not just for blasphemies against Christ I'd rather not describe, but also for detailing religious justifications to harm Gentiles and rule them.

Curious what your perspective is. I notice secular Jews behave one way out of ethnic interests (even subconsciously), and a much smaller segment of Jews behaving identically for religious reasons.
I personally didn’t know any Jews growing up who made ideological statements, based on the Talmud, about ruling over Gentiles or even hating them. I grew up in Reform Judaism, where anti-European sentiment is beaten into your head constantly through the endless propagation of Holocaust stuff, but it was always based on that and not “ideology” per se. Most Jews I grew up with didn’t seem especially devout but some did, and my childhood rabbi was / is an incredibly kind man who I don’t think could hurt a fly. The anti-European hate/fear (it’s more of a fear that results in hateful sentiment) stuff is more of a steady drumbeat playing in the background than the overt, explicit stuff that I’m sure some more “devout” Jews might be into.
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I personally didn’t know any Jews growing up who made ideological statements, based on the Talmud, about ruling over Gentiles or even hating them. I grew up in Reform Judaism, where anti-European sentiment is beaten into your head constantly through the endless propagation of Holocaust stuff, but it was always based on that and not “ideology” per se. Most Jews I grew up with didn’t seem especially devout but some did, and my childhood rabbi was / is an incredibly kind man who I don’t think could hurt a fly. The anti-European hate/fear (it’s more of a fear that results in hateful sentiment) stuff is more of a steady drumbeat playing in the background than the overt, explicit stuff that I’m sure some more “devout” Jews might be into.

How is the anti-European card played, since the holocaust was the work of Germany? Is it tied in to the Jewish expulsions?

And how does this contrast to what is known as the Arab world, where virtually all Jews have been removed?

It appears actions and words against Muslims are much smaller, beyond the Palestinians. But this doesn't make much sense, as once Europe and The US are gone, so is Israel.
 
Praying for more female jewish converts to Christianity, same with the muslims, would make searching for a wife with true faith a more worthwhile task (anyone who chooses Jesus after growing up in those cultures is hardened in spirit beyond most regular Christians, at least the ones I've come across who were not living and breathing the word). Any idea on where to look or how to help in this regard?
 

lskdfjldsf

Pelican
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
Praying for more female jewish converts to Christianity, same with the muslims, would make searching for a wife with true faith a more worthwhile task (anyone who chooses Jesus after growing up in those cultures is hardened in spirit beyond most regular Christians, at least the ones I've come across who were not living and breathing the word). Any idea on where to look or how to help in this regard?

There is no such thing as a perfect woman "as is" and Jewish/Muslim converts will likely be culturally alien to you with lots of friction between families. Find a woman who believes in God (there are many), and she'll mature and grow in her spirituality with your guidance.

My wife listened to Ben Shapiro and never went to church when I met her, now she reads Kevin MacDonald and works on our icon corner.
 
I still think it's worse with protestants, generally. The Catholics may drift, but the church itself perseveres, for 2000 years and counting. One way to gauge it is how much grief they get from the Jews versus the protestants. Which group has more "Christian zionists?" Which one has gay flags flying inside and outside of their churches? Who's officiating gay weddings? Which ones have married gay clergy? I could go on...
The Catholic churches that do any of that are inevitably recognized as led by apostates, and inevitably see their properties turned into condos or gay discos. As disappointing as Pope Francis may be, he still pisses off the Christ haters, wherever they are.

If they're still getting flack, the Catholics are over the target. Not so for the Israel-loving evangelists.

Who is the protestant equivalent of E Michael Jones? That is a discussion I would like to hear, but so far the few he's talked to on YouTube are either disguised klansmen wannabes or conversos like Dr. Brown. Yes, the Catholic church definitely has their problems, but this isn't their first rodeo.
Globalists and Judaists from early on saw the Catholic Church as the main obstacle to "progress." H.G. Wells wrote Crux Ansata: An Indictment of the Catholic Church, during WW2, which begins with the suggestion that "we" (the Allies) bomb the Vatican (what a great humanitarian he was!). This is the same guy who wanted a New World Order. Paul Blanshard wrote American Freedom and Catholic Power in 1949, likewise suggesting Catholicism was an alien, atavistic force, which somehow commanded great loyalty among its adherents, and which would have to be defanged or eliminated if liberalism was to triumph.

Unfortunately, with a little help from the CIA, Wells and Blanshard largely got their way - the Catholic Church wasn't destroyed from without, or subjected to a wave of glorious martyrdom, but (what is far worse) weakened from within, through the 1960s "reforms," and we're living with the consequences. However, as you point out, something of that old animus remains. On the one hand, the existence of so-called "liberal Catholics" (it would be much better for everyone if they weren't identifiable as Catholics at all) is something secular globalists love pointing to - "look, you can still be Catholic and woke - look, JOE BIDEN IS A DEVOUT CATHOLIC, and he supports abortion and trans rights!" So there's less of this liberal rhetoric "we need to destroy the Catholics, they are the one group standing in our way," and more of a "good Catholics vs. bad Catholics" distinction. On the other hand, despite all the post-1960s disasters, the Catholic Church hasn't completely given in, there are still trad Catholics, and even mainstream conservative Catholics won't budge on some issues, so this special hate for Catholics as the enemies of progress remains.

This has deep roots in early modern secularizing thinkers like Bacon and Locke. In A Letter concerning Toleration (1689), Locke argued that the state should tolerate religious differences (even including Jews, and I think Muslims), with two exceptions - atheists (you can't trust them to be good citizens because they don't believe God will punish them for treachery) and Catholics (you can't trust them to be good citizens because their first loyalty is to a foreign potentate, i.e. the pope).
 
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