Buying toys for kids is a bad idea

Tardynox

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
So me and my mom were clearing out the attic, and so we came across a bunch of old toys I had from my childhood. Me and my dad wanted them gone for years at this point, but my mom kept saying we should keep them or give them to some family members. So well today we got to the point of just dumping them, this came about because I asked my mom why we are keeping all these things, and she said "I don't know", which probably caused some doubt in here and she finally gave in.

This all got me thinking, like we humans are way too attached to these "childhood memories", which are basically bound to some cheap plastic thing made in a huge Chinese factory with no one even giving a damn about it, and here we are being all emotional over throwing them away. Same goes for dolls, we're conditioning kids to worship idols in a way because kids can often become super attached to some stupid bear or panda which they take all around everywhere they go.

Besides, it is a useless thing for kids to do. In the past toys were less common, or even a rarity. Kids were learned how to do useful stuff and take on practical skills, and here we are letting little children indulge themselves in interacting with a bunch of coloured plastic objects because "they need to enjoy their childhood" (nowadays we're moving on to digital forms of toys, but that is the same, just that it makes kids even dumber in practice).

I have a feeling this could perhaps be a controversial topic, so I am curious to see the responses. Have a blessed day everyone.
 

BasilSeal

Kingfisher
Catholic
Gold Member
My brother and I had enough G.I. Joe, Star Wars figures and "locking blocks" (we didn't have official Legos), to kick start our imaginations, build worlds for them, and make a day of creating situations and stories, but by no means a lot of any.

At a manageable level, I consider their ability to facilitate imagination and cooperative play to be a good thing. Likewise, building collections like baseball cards or stickers is a positive way for kids to learn to organize and manage, take care of, group and sort items of their own.

I generally agree with you that, toys leave a strong imprint, and I could probably tell you which I had and which I didn't have, although they're long gone. For me, toys are a nice jump off point to recall the memories of time spent with my siblings.

I also remember notable toys other kids had; and, although I don't really draw many conclusions about it, some of the worst kids had the best toys. There can be plenty of reasons for that. I doubt it was the toys that made them little punks. Meanwhile we were probably subbing in a paper drawing to play Destroy, etc for toys we never had.

We are happy to be rid of our kids toys, as they have gotten older. Donating a bag of miscellaneous stuffed animals and other unidentifiable little bits of plastic feels like such a relief, evidence that kids are maturing.
 
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Tardynox

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Kids like toys. There are plenty of wholesome options available. Why not give them things they like, in reasonable moderation? Life doesn't have to be all sackcloth and ashes from infancy.
Would be urged to bring up the "Moderation is a Lie" article by Roosh, but my views perhaps are a bit extreme. Talked about it with a friend and he suggested we could have kids learning how to make their own toys, in part to learn practical skills but also so that they can be replaced in a more economical manner instead of having to buy them again.
 

JGB

Pigeon
Orthodox
Kids like toys. There are plenty of wholesome options available. Why not give them things they like, in reasonable moderation? Life doesn't have to be all sackcloth and ashes from infancy.
Agreed, although a lot of toys made these days suck. My brother was visiting recently, and we brought out some of the old toys like transformers and the kids loved them. Apparently they don't make anything like that anymore. Would be nice to have a toy manufacturer that focused on making quality toys that kids actually love again instead of pro-LGBTQ+ propaganda props.
 

Cavalier

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Would be urged to bring up the "Moderation is a Lie" article by Roosh, but my views perhaps are a bit extreme. Talked about it with a friend and he suggested we could have kids learning how to make their own toys, in part to learn practical skills but also so that they can be replaced in a more economical manner instead of having to buy them again.
If you raise your kids too harshly they will associate your unnecessary extremes with religion and will likely leave it behind at the first chance.
 

CaliforniaBased

Woodpecker
Catholic
Certain toys were very, very useful to me as a kid.

Bicycle - this was like my car. I needed this to get around and go places with the other kids.
Skateboard - for the sport I was into.
Tools to fix the bike + skateboard
Cellphone - to contact the other kids
Legos - I think they did help me develop my brain in a way that is useful to me today
Various bats, balls, etc for sports.
Fishing equipment.

Certain toys I think are junk - video games, etc.
 

newcomer

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
Certain toys were very, very useful to me as a kid.

Bicycle - this was like my car. I needed this to get around and go places with the other kids.
Skateboard - for the sport I was into.
Tools to fix the bike + skateboard
Cellphone - to contact the other kids
Legos - I think they did help me develop my brain in a way that is useful to me today
Various bats, balls, etc for sports.
Fishing equipment.

Certain toys I think are junk - video games, etc.
only one I would consider a toy is the Legos.
Children need the play to develop, its okay for them to have toys. I think they dont need much of the junk that is being sold today. Sticks, stones, wooden blocks, simple things and fantasy were and are enough, nowadays parents drive it to the extremes. Let them have toys, not anything stupid, shiny or over the top.

Also an opinion of a young lad, I would like to see a POV of practicing parents and their thoughts.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
Lego has been hurt by their embrace of endless licensed nonsense, but the quality of the toys is extremely high and far above typical cheapo junk. It’s definitely worth it to give your kids higher quality toys with more longevity. It’s also not as simple as denouncing everything made in China, as China is more than capable of making high quality stuff - it’s just that we usually pay them to make a cheapo product and the quality suffers as a result.
 

Tardynox

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Lego has been hurt by their embrace of endless licensed nonsense, but the quality of the toys is extremely high and far above typical cheapo junk. It’s definitely worth it to give your kids higher quality toys with more longevity. It’s also not as simple as denouncing everything made in China, as China is more than capable of making high quality stuff - it’s just that we usually pay them to make a cheapo product and the quality suffers as a result.
Fair point, I was just making a generalisation so don't take it too literally I guess.
 

RedLagoon

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
I loved my model trains and wish I still had them since my mom gave them away. I loved building the tracks and making the trains run through electricity. Also making the landscapes around it was very rewarding.

I do agree with the sense of modern colorful cheap plastic toys being a waste but toys in general can be good.

I mean my uncle has dinky toys from his youth (50's) and my children love playing with them.

Especially now I'm a parent I need a break sometimes.
 

Chiosboy90

Woodpecker
I play A LOT Duplo with my 2 year old and today she said "dadda come castle duplo" and we builded one and she role played with figures that they all make a pizza birthdsy party inside
For me this builds a good memory as well as for my daughter. Buying too much Toys can make a child confused and nervous but Im a fan of good well thought out children toys.
We also rotate toys which means we put some in the basement and put it back up after couple of weeks and voila, its again interesting.
 

Tardynox

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Every one of you has given some good ideas and perspectives here, and perhaps I was a little extreme in my viewpoint. I can definitely relate to stuff like this being enjoyable:
I loved my model trains and wish I still had them since my mom gave them away. I loved building the tracks and making the trains run through electricity. Also making the landscapes around it was very rewarding.
Perhaps so long as you can keep a child's imagination running well, it's a nice addition. But of course a lot of the modern stuff is just a bunch of crap that probably isn't doing children a lot of good in a lot of ways.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
Every one of you has given some good ideas and perspectives here, and perhaps I was a little extreme in my viewpoint. I can definitely relate to stuff like this being enjoyable:

Perhaps so long as you can keep a child's imagination running well, it's a nice addition. But of course a lot of the modern stuff is just a bunch of crap that probably isn't doing children a lot of good in a lot of ways.
This is a good viewpoint. There can be too many toys for a kid. There can be junky toys that are only fun to play with one or two times then they go on the ever growing pile of unused toys. Some are actually degenerate, like the Bratz dolls for girls.


However, there can be good toys, and it's OK for kids to play with them.
 

BasilSeal

Kingfisher
Catholic
Gold Member
At big gifting events, it was not uncommon for us to let our kids tear open the wrapping paper for all gifts, select a favorite gift to play with, and then for us to put many of the rest away, until or unless asked about. This worked very well to keep the toy clutter down through "natural selection". Unopened toys were eventually given away at some future date.
 
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