Can Single People Become Mature?

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Originally posted on RooshV.com

woman-flowers-1024x683.jpg

As a single man, I don’t think I will ever reach a level of maturity as that of my married peers, because there is nothing material outside of me that I care more about than myself. The entire world revolves around me and my needs, even if they include the realm of the spiritual, and so I am the most important created being in the universe and always will be. That would change in an instant if I were to get married, but until then, my adult development has peaked.

Maturity is the de-idolization of self, the deicide of the god we make ourselves to be upon growing up in a Western culture that emphasizes individuality and personal will. I don’t see how a person can become mature in full form without marriage, either to a spouse or to the Church through the monastic vows where they die to the world. A single person may become a faithful follower of Jesus Christ, and his soul can certainly be saved, but always present within him will be a weed of self-idolatry that sprouts through the forms of neuroticism and conceitedness. Only the rough grinder of marriage can smooth out these childish and pathological qualities to allow the person to serve their fellow man as God intended.

There are four kinds of people: (1) Single people without God, (2) Single people with God, (3) Married people without God, and (4) Married people with God. As expected, single people without God are the most immature, essentially acting as children in fully-developed adult bodies, of which I was one in the not-so-distant past. You would then think that single people with God have more maturity than married people without God, but this is not automatically the case. Since marriage is given to us by God, it confers emotional and mental maturity to those who partake in it to aid them with raising a family. I have seen single people who go to church every Sunday acting far less mature than agnostic married couples, because while receiving the Eucharist during a two-hour church service is a sacrament, living as a single person in your pleasure-ensconced apartment box for the other 166 hours of the week is not, and unless that single person methodically chooses to be a “monk in the world”—and the debate is still out if that can be done successfully in modern times—his life will be more secular than Christian. Therefore, unless you have a burning zeal or unique ministry as a single person that keeps your eyes constantly on Christ, you will face an intense temptation to idolize your needs, perceptions, and pleasures.

Tinder


Married people who have God in their lives (and I include monastics in this category) are the most mature, loving, altruistic, caring, and thoughtful people I’ve met. The grace that God has given them from marriage has allowed them to reach the height of Christian life that I simply don’t see in single believers, even ones who read Christian books all day like myself, because reading books or writing about God like I’m doing now are not sacraments and not enough on their own for salvation unless it coincides with a living faith. It is in God’s wisdom that he created marriage to essentially be a 24-hour church where you can constantly serve your neighbor (i.e. family) through love to help you be saved, and what a risk it is to try a novel and non-sacramental path to salvation by being a Christian hipster farmer or Christian content creator who takes down low IQ heretics. If maturity is an aid to serving God, and the only way to attain that maturity is through marriage, either to another person (the right person) or to the Church directly through monasticism, that should be a hint to us that we should be wholly unsatisfied with being single as a Christian life plan.

When I was received into ROCOR, I asked multiple priests and monks what advice they had for a newly baptized 41-year-old man with no wife. I was struck by the similarity in their response: “Stay close to the Church and don’t go it alone.” From their experience, a Christian is doomed to fall if he doesn’t take Church life seriously, and even I have seen firsthand how men who received God’s grace and believed they didn’t need the Church went on to fall for ancient heresies or other delusions that damaged their faith. From the guidance I’ve received, I can automatically reject plans where I am isolated from a local parish or other Christians.

For most people, single life is a dead life. They will fail to mature and grow spiritually, eventually succumbing to one of Satan’s tricks. I could make the argument that my writing is a fruitful ministry that can enable me to live in the world as a single man, but only time will tell. If I’m falling backward or am not developing spiritually then it will be time for a change. God clearly laid out his plan for us: either get married or become a monk. We should be wary of trying a third option.

Read Next: 3 Spiritual Types Of Women
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Ciudad de Dios

Pigeon
Orthodox Catechumen
The single vocation is truly the forgotten vocation. Rather than seeing singleness as a gift and calling from God, erroneous opinions abound. Many look upon the single person as somehow deficient or wanting. They were unmarriageable or rejects who couldn't get in a seminary/convent. The secular world sees unmarried women as “closet lesbians” or “old maids” who couldn't get a husband. Single men are “closet homosexuals" or "have problems." Only men who sleep around like heathens can wear "proudly" the badge of "swinging single." All of these ideas are deficient, inaccurate, and disparaging. They show a crass ignorance. Being single is noble and people are called by God to live their life in that way. It is a state superior to marriage. To remain single in the world and live a life of perfect chastity is to act as an ambassador of Christ representing Him and doing all for His greater glory. This is both lawful and meritorious. It is a life most pleasing to God. The single life of necessity entails perfect chastity because the use of sex is exclusively for the married. However, unlike the other vocations, the single life is the only one that does not entail taking a solemn promise or vow. Monks and nuns must take binding vows to remain celibate, and married people take marriage vows; the married have rights over each other's bodies for life, but they are also chaste according to their state in life. Sex must be open to procreation and they must remain faithful to each other, together raising all children in the Church. In this sense, the single person has a better chance to save his/her soul, not having formally committed themselves to special duties and responsibilities.

For those who are single and still wondering if the vocation is chosen for them by God, remember there is nothing wrong for praying that God may send you a suitable spouse (if it be His Will), or for praying that God may grant you entry into a monastery (if it be His Will). Always be resigned to God's Will for you. In addition to praying for a particular vocation it is wise to pray that God will guide you to where He wants you to be.
 
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Blade Runner

Ostrich
Orthodox
A single person may become a faithful follower of Jesus Christ, and his soul can certainly be saved, but always present within him will be a weed of self-idolatry that sprouts through the forms of neuroticism and conceitedness.

I understand where you are coming from here Roosh, but your experience and what you see in the world (unhealthy prolongation of singleness in general and shunning of marriage/kids) are majorly biasing you.

A married person with kids can idolize his kids and do the exact same type of destructive worshipping of his own genes.

On balance this isn't one of your better posts, but again I do see where you are coming from (you just tend to overstress your particular "lot" in life). A lot of us overdo our own situation because by definition that is what we are most worried about.

Let's keep continuing to pray for one another. Best to all.
 

Early Bird

Sparrow
Although we are all sinners, we all have different gifts and strengths to offer the world.

Sometimes people come into our lives for various reasons and teach us something valuable. They can offer grace, strength, understanding, encouragement, inspiration, love, discipline, etc. and even bring us closer to God. We should remain open to these experiences. It's like life is whispering a beautiful, complex poem to us.

It's hard for us to have total perspective of ourselves, and we all have blind spots and weaknesses.

We should be encouraging young people to get married and start families. That is the backbone of a healthy culture and a healthy society. The problem is there are so many damaged, lost souls wandering around full of cynicism and resentment.

Despite the very real risks for men today, and after years of 'red pill' hesitation, I have made the decision to get married. It's been a very long and difficult road to get here with my fiancee. She was seduced by feminism and athiesm at a young age. Wasted many years of her 20's with travel, and had a very liberal worldview. After my own repentance (my past lifestyle was similar but not nearly as severe as Roosh's) I was able to clearly see these things and offer guidance to her. She initially fought me but has come to realize I was a benevolent and helpful figure, guiding her with love. I have shown her a depth of love and happiness she never knew was possible. I have brought her back to the church.

We lost a baby boy recently and it was the most painful thing I've ever experienced in my life. It was also the most beautiful thing I've ever experienced, and has deepened my faith. I feel so grateful for having met him and pray to one day see him again.

There's always temptation. There's always doubt. A man must make a decision and stand by it, in spite of these things, to keep them at bay. Fear and hesitation are feminine qualities. Always thinking there's something better just around the corner ('hypergamy').

Owen Benjamin had a funny bit about guys who think sleeping with a bunch of women makes them a man. He said no, a man picks one and stays (knowing she will often do crazy things and it will be frustrating). That a guy leaving his woman for another one because she did something crazy is like moving because your house has walls.
 

Cartographer

Pelican
Gold Member
I can try to take on a ton of responsibility through my church or at my job. I could develop a skill or master an art. Maybe I can even become a monk. But there will always be a permanent difference in maturity between me and a married man. If the guy has kids, forget about it. He can be a woke, irresponsible idiot and I'll still be missing something that he has. Some kinds of experiences change you in ways that don't have substitutes. Combat, fame, leadership, wealth, poverty all leave their mark but being a married man and father is probably the most significant in terms of its effect on maturity.

Taking the church life seriously is a really important, and for me, its been a rough first step. It seems like if you're faithful in that, and maybe some other challenges God gives you (or whacks you in the side of the head with), I'd be surprised if you weren't trusted with a wife sooner rather than later. Although by that time you might not be feeling so froggy about it.
 
Roosh, you make great points in this article. Psychologist David Snarch, in his book Passionate Marriage explains, “If you allow it, the people-growing machinery of marriage results in the simultaneous development of your sexuality, your personhood, and your level of intimacy with your partner.”

However, Scripture tells us in 1 Cor 7:8-9, “Now to the unmarried and to widows, I say: it is a good thing for them to remain as they are, as I do, but if they cannot exercise self–control they should marry, for it is better to marry than to be on fire.”

So, God is telling us that something about the single life is preferable for a Christian if a person is able to manage it. As always, we know, “the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom” (1 Cor 1:25). So, even though what God is telling us about being single may not make sense, I must defer to God’s wisdom over my own or any other person’s wisdom.
 
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MichaelWitcoff

Ostrich
Orthodox
Roosh, you make great points in this article. Psychologist David Snarch, in his book Passionate Marriage explains, “If you allow it, the people-growing machinery of marriage results in the simultaneous development of your sexuality, your personhood, and your level of intimacy with your partner.”

However, Scripture tells us in 1 Cor 7:8-9, “Now to the unmarried and to widows, I say: it is a good thing for them to remain as they are, as I do, but if they cannot exercise self–control they should marry, for it is better to marry than to be on fire.”

So, God is telling us that something about the single life is preferable for a Christian if a person is able to manage it. As always, we know, “the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom” (1 Cor 1:25). So, even though what God is telling us about being single may not make sense, I must defer to God’s wisdom over my own or any other person’s wisdom.
Well, St. Paul is not speaking of simply being a single person living in the world. He is speaking of being totally and completely dedicated to God, which for the Orthodox means monasticism. St. Paul may not have been a proper or tonsured "monk" at the time, but his life was split into working to pay the bills and working for God with very little, if anything, else going on. That is more or less what monks still do today: split their time between manual labor and spiritual work. On either salvific path - marriage or monasticism - the person is following Christ's commandment to die to himself or herself in order to pick up their Cross and follow Him. That is significantly different from "the single life."
 

NickK

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Roosh, you make great points in this article. Psychologist David Snarch, in his book Passionate Marriage explains, “If you allow it, the people-growing machinery of marriage results in the simultaneous development of your sexuality, your personhood, and your level of intimacy with your partner.”

However, Scripture tells us in 1 Cor 7:8-9, “Now to the unmarried and to widows, I say: it is a good thing for them to remain as they are, as I do, but if they cannot exercise self–control they should marry, for it is better to marry than to be on fire.”

So, God is telling us that something about the single life is preferable for a Christian if a person is able to manage it. As always, we know, “the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom” (1 Cor 1:25). So, even though what God is telling us about being single may not make sense, I must defer to God’s wisdom over my own or any other person’s wisdom.
1 Cor 7:8-9 meant something quite different than a modern day single man. It meant a monk (or nun), although the term and the mystery of monastic tonsure wasn't there yet. A person devoted to the Church. Not a person isolated in his apartment, sitting in front of a computer all day and going to Sunday's liturgy for a couple of hours.

Edit: Redundant post!
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
1 Cor 7:8-9 meant something quite different than a modern day single man. It meant a monk (or nun), although the term and the mystery of monastic tonsure wasn't there yet. A person devoted to the Church. Not a person isolated in his apartment, sitting in front of a computer all day and going to Sunday's liturgy for a couple of hours.
Right, we've got single people spending copious amounts of time on social media who think they're totally like what Paul was describing. I'm guilty of this as well, but I have my pregnant wife to drive me harder than I ever would have worked as a single man. I can't have tantrums or be visibly stressed or skip prayers, I have other people to worry about as a "domestic pastor" as Fr. Josiah likes to say. Also every single Christian in Paul's time under persecution was a monastic in essence.

It's surprising to see single men so boastful about their single status when you never see married men claim they were better Christians as single men. Even if a man gets married, has children, and ends up getting divorced, there is a humility that is gained there, and perspective in caring for your children and making it work.

Every married man has been single at some point.
 
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Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
I understand where you are coming from here Roosh, but your experience and what you see in the world (unhealthy prolongation of singleness in general and shunning of marriage/kids) are majorly biasing you.

A married person with kids can idolize his kids and do the exact same type of destructive worshipping of his own genes.

I think this is a good point. The cult of family can easily become a cult of self, too.

That seems to be part of the resistance to family and kids in some of the younger set, because all they see is the LOOOOOOK AT MEEEEEEEEE!!!! social media aspect, and they assume that's all it's about.
 

Ciudad de Dios

Pigeon
Orthodox Catechumen
It's surprising to see single men so boastful about their single status when you never see married men claim they were better Christians as single men. Even if a man gets married, has children, and ends up getting divorced, there is a humility that is gained there, and perspective in caring for your children and making it work.
Perhaps because their calling is to the married life, not the single life. We’ve got married people spending copious amounts if time on social media, too…
 
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Father Michael

Chicken
Orthodox
Originally posted on RooshV.com

woman-flowers-1024x683.jpg

As a single man, I don’t think I will ever reach a level of maturity as that of my married peers, because there is nothing material outside of me that I care more about than myself. The entire world revolves around me and my needs, even if they include the realm of the spiritual, and so I am the most important created being in the universe and always will be. That would change in an instant if I were to get married, but until then, my adult development has peaked.

Maturity is the de-idolization of self, the deicide of the god we make ourselves to be upon growing up in a Western culture that emphasizes individuality and personal will. I don’t see how a person can become mature in full form without marriage, either to a spouse or to the Church through the monastic vows where they die to the world. A single person may become a faithful follower of Jesus Christ, and his soul can certainly be saved, but always present within him will be a weed of self-idolatry that sprouts through the forms of neuroticism and conceitedness. Only the rough grinder of marriage can smooth out these childish and pathological qualities to allow the person to serve their fellow man as God intended.

There are four kinds of people: (1) Single people without God, (2) Single people with God, (3) Married people without God, and (4) Married people with God. As expected, single people without God are the most immature, essentially acting as children in fully-developed adult bodies, of which I was one in the not-so-distant past. You would then think that single people with God have more maturity than married people without God, but this is not automatically the case. Since marriage is given to us by God, it confers emotional and mental maturity to those who partake in it to aid them with raising a family. I have seen single people who go to church every Sunday acting far less mature than agnostic married couples, because while receiving the Eucharist during a two-hour church service is a sacrament, living as a single person in your pleasure-ensconced apartment box for the other 166 hours of the week is not, and unless that single person methodically chooses to be a “monk in the world”—and the debate is still out if that can be done successfully in modern times—his life will be more secular than Christian. Therefore, unless you have a burning zeal or unique ministry as a single person that keeps your eyes constantly on Christ, you will face an intense temptation to idolize your needs, perceptions, and pleasures.

Tinder


Married people who have God in their lives (and I include monastics in this category) are the most mature, loving, altruistic, caring, and thoughtful people I’ve met. The grace that God has given them from marriage has allowed them to reach the height of Christian life that I simply don’t see in single believers, even ones who read Christian books all day like myself, because reading books or writing about God like I’m doing now are not sacraments and not enough on their own for salvation unless it coincides with a living faith. It is in God’s wisdom that he created marriage to essentially be a 24-hour church where you can constantly serve your neighbor (i.e. family) through love to help you be saved, and what a risk it is to try a novel and non-sacramental path to salvation by being a Christian hipster farmer or Christian content creator who takes down low IQ heretics. If maturity is an aid to serving God, and the only way to attain that maturity is through marriage, either to another person (the right person) or to the Church directly through monasticism, that should be a hint to us that we should be wholly unsatisfied with being single as a Christian life plan.

When I was received into ROCOR, I asked multiple priests and monks what advice they had for a newly baptized 41-year-old man with no wife. I was struck by the similarity in their response: “Stay close to the Church and don’t go it alone.” From their experience, a Christian is doomed to fall if he doesn’t take Church life seriously, and even I have seen firsthand how men who received God’s grace and believed they didn’t need the Church went on to fall for ancient heresies or other delusions that damaged their faith. From the guidance I’ve received, I can automatically reject plans where I am isolated from a local parish or other Christians.

For most people, single life is a dead life. They will fail to mature and grow spiritually, eventually succumbing to one of Satan’s tricks. I could make the argument that my writing is a fruitful ministry that can enable me to live in the world as a single man, but only time will tell. If I’m falling backward or am not developing spiritually then it will be time for a change. God clearly laid out his plan for us: either get married or become a monk. We should be wary of trying a third option.

Read Next: 3 Spiritual Types Of Women
Permalink
Psychological maturity is downstream from spiritual maturity.
 

Ciudad de Dios

Pigeon
Orthodox Catechumen
St Silouan the Athonite: “In the last days there will be many with the monastic spirit living in the world as a witness to the Faith, neither married, nor having taken the monastic vows, but single, yet monastics at heart.”

The single life should not be thought of as a "default position" for those who can't find someone to marry, or don't have a monastic vocation. It is true that there are three kinds of people who embrace the single vocation: those who want marriage but cannot find someone suitable and (wisely) will not enter into a bad marriage; those who sought the priesthood or monastic vocation but couldn't make it for some reason; those who feel called to be single from the very outset.

Being single is everyone's state in life for at least a short time. Not everyone will become a monk, nun, or get married. However, every monk and married person was single until their profession of vows or marriage. Those who fall into the first two categories of people who are single can accept their state without bitterness as a manifestation of God's will and thereby make their vocation as meritorious as those who choose it from the very start of their adult life.
 
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I think singleness here is something thrust upon many by our dysfunctional society. It's not a lifestyle choice by people here.

Yet, since you can't just go down to the wife store and find a suitable wife, you can:

1) do what you can to prepare for marriage
2) do what you can to prepare for singleness, in case marriage never happens
3) move to Afghanistan:
 

Ciudad de Dios

Pigeon
Orthodox Catechumen
Here is a more balanced Orthodox perspective:


Nowadays so many people, so many friends and acquaintances of mine, especially middle-aged, are disappointed, drained, left alone with children, empty and lonely (both in and out of relationships), feeling robbed. What are we to do with our lives in order to avoid self-centered ends and the spiritual abyss? Marriage and monasticism most certainly lead to the most intimate communion with the Creator and fellow creature and fulfill their promises: the soul can still be purified through either of them. They restore the soul’s appetitive drive to its divine orientation. The roads are narrow, their gates straight, but they lead to the deification of the soul. But maybe this path is not open to us — yet? — for a variety of reasons and circumstances. So WHAT is to be done?

Apparently, there is also a third way. Jesus Christ teaches that certain people are called by God to the single life.

And I say to you: whoever divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, and marries another, commits adultery. The disciples said to Him: “If such is the case of a man with his wife, it is expedient not to marry.” But He said to them: “Not all people can receive this saying, but only to those to whom it is given. For there are eunuchs who have been so from birth, and there are eunuchs who have been made so by men, and there are eunuchs who have made themselves eunuchs for the sake of the kingdom of heaven. He who is able to receive this, let him receive it.” (Mt 19:9-12)

The apostle Paul elaborates on Jesus’ teaching.

It is well for a man not to touch a woman. But because of the temptation to immorality each man should have his own wife and each woman her own husband… I say this by way of concession, not of command. I wish that all were as I myself am. But each has his own special gift from God, one of one kind and one of another.

To the unmarried and the widows I say that it is well for them to remain single as I do. But if they cannot exercise self-control, they should marry. For it is better to marry than to be aflame with passion…
And unto the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband: But and if she depart, let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband: and let not the husband put away his wife. … Only let every one lead the life which the Lord has assigned to him, and in which God has called him. (See 1 Cor. 7)

The single calling

The single life is a calling. It is a way of life which is given by God. A person, certainly a Christian person, does not choose to be single or to be married. He or she rather discovers the way of life which the Lord provides within the conditions of his or her existence. People really only chose to receive, or to reject, what has been given them. They do not determine it.

There are any number of reasons why a person may be single. They range from the sense of having a positive calling to the celibate life for religious purposes, to the plain fact of being unmarried without one’s own conscious choice, and perhaps even against it, just because this is the way that things have happened to work out. Whatever the reason for one’s being single and however mysterious or ambiguous, willed or unwilled the causes for one’s being in this state, at some point in our adult life each of us must accept the form of life which is ours and consciously offer it to the Lord, freely and voluntarily, for the sake of the love of God and neighbor.

Sanctifying the single life

The single life is sanctified the way every life is sanctified: by perfecting it according to God’s will. The first task of the single person according to God’s teaching as revealed by Jesus Christ and the apostles, martyrs and saints of the Christian Church, is that of maintaining and developing one’s sexual chastity.

The single person who says “yes” to God and to his or her calling to the single life automatically says “no” to all forms of physical, sexual activity with the opposite sex, with one’s own sex and with oneself. This is so because sexual actions other than the conjugal act of married love destroy the wholeness and integrity of one’s being through the dissipation of one’s spiritual and physical energies. No matter how loving, fulfilling and pleasurable they may at first appear to be, sexual commitments without the totally faithful commitment of unending love in marriage – with all of the responsibilities and obligations for inter-personal communion and the pro-creation and protection of human life which this involves – cannot but result in dissatisfaction, disappointment, despondency and despair. this is so because human persons are made in the image and likeness of God who is Love, and as such can find fulfillment and happiness only in ways of living and acting which express and image His own.

A hard saying

The teaching about sexual purity in the single life is a difficult one. When many people hear it they are moved to say what Christ’s disciples said when they heard other of His teachings: Lord, this is a hard word. Who can hear it? Who then can be saved? And the Lord’s answer is always the same. He said that His teaching has to be hard because “the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few”, adding as well the fundamental point that as far as His teaching is concerned, “with human being it is impossible, but with God all things are possible”, particularly to those who believe. (See Jn 6:60; Mt 7:13-14; 17-21; Lk 18:27; 35)

Like all forms of Godly life and behavior, the single life of celibate chastity is a way of the Cross. It is a way of sacrifice and suffering which alone brings joy and happiness to a human being.

Conditions for perfection

For the single life to be perfected according to God’s will, with the preservation of sexual purity as its heart and foundation certain conditions must be fulfilled. First of all there must be firm spiritual discipline for the sake of a lively interior life. The single person must have a rule of prayer which is diligently kept, with the reading and pondering of wholesome and edifying words and images. Great attention must be given to keep oneself free of all thoughts and images which lead to spiritual and physical defilement and disintegration. The “spouse” and “life partner” for the single person in the most direct and specific way must be the Lord himself.

The single person must also have a firm rule of external life and behavior. Capricious and willful actions, things done without order or form, but just as they happen to come up, must be avoided at all costs. Forms of responsibility and accountability to others must be found and fulfilled with conscious obedience. This is especially true for those who do not have such natural obligations as, or example, the care of elderly or infirm parents or relatives, or duties within a religious community.

The single person must also be committed in a formal way to a spiritual father or mother, which can be a member of the clergy, a monastic, or even a lay person mature in the faith. If, due to specific circumstances this should prove impossible, then the single person must, as everyone else, draw his strength and knowledge from the Holy fathers, the lives of the Saints and, of course, the Scriptures.





Some might say that such conditions are necessary for all who are living a human life according to God’s will, whether or not they happen to be single. This is true. But these conditions are particularly necessary for the single person precisely because of their single state in a world which renders them particularly vulnerable to self –centeredness and loneliness on the one hand, and lack of commitment and accountability on the other, with the additional cross of often being misunderstood and taken advantage of by those around them because of their single status.



Christ and the Saints

It is common in the modern world to think that one cannot be fulfilled as a human being in the single state, especially if living a sexually continent and chaste life. The claim is that without sexual activity and intimacy, a human person is diminished and even distorted in his basic humanity. If this is true, then the Christian faith as understood and practiced by the Orthodox, and by millions of other Christians, is wholly false.



The Lord Jesus Christ was single and celibate, yet He was the most perfect human being who ever lived, the Son of God and God Himself in human form. Jesus’ mother Mary, though legally married, remained a virgin her entire life. John the Baptist, whom Jesus called the greatest man ever born of woman, was clearly a chaste celibate according to the Gospels. So was the apostle and evangelist John. So was the apostle Paul who, as we have seen by his own report was single at the time of his conversion and ministry. Indeed, the calendar of Orthodox Church saints is filled with single people who are praised and honored for their chastity and devotion to God and their neighbors. In this perspective it is clearly the Christian conviction that being single is conducive to the highest and most perfect for of fulfillment possible to human beings: the life of sanctity . (Source: St. Luke’s Orthodox Mission)
 

Blade Runner

Ostrich
Orthodox
I think singleness here is something thrust upon many by our dysfunctional society. It's not a lifestyle choice by people here.

Yet, since you can't just go down to the wife store and find a suitable wife, you can:

1) do what you can to prepare for marriage
2) do what you can to prepare for singleness, in case marriage never happens
3) move to Afghanistan:
For me it was like, 1) ok ... 2) ok 3)

Hilariously-Unexpected-GIFs-8.gif
 
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