Can You Be Friends with Leftists?

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
The question is flawed as it implies a binary choice. People are either leftists or, presumably, "rightists."
I am not right wing, at least not in its form as presented in American politics. In fact, I have even bigger problems with Republicans than I do Democrats.

But to answer the question, it depends on what they believe. Really, politics is not something that the masses were ever supposed to participate in, but left to scholars, philosophers, thinkers, and leaders, and so we are not even supposed to know the political opinions of others. The mess of democracy means that everyone is supposed to have political positions on every issue, such as what sort of government Ukranians should have and what type of trade policy is best for the Chinese, and whether Amazon's workers should form a union.

If someone is a traditional Democrat (holding Bill Clinton era views), as most of my friends are, then it's no issue whatsoever. I keep my views to myself, unless we can discuss something where our views coincide, like worker rights, the environment, peace, middle class, etc.

If someone believes in transexualism, gay marriage, etc. then it's very difficult to be friends with them. But unless they are themselves a gay tranny, why do they even take up a pro-tranny position? That is a zealot, an ideologue, an extremist, and not anyone I want to be associated with.

I have a gay acquaintance/friend who is opposed to gay marriage, doesn't like trannies, and doesn't like anything about public sexuality. He is attracted to men, and whether he acts on that or not I'd rather not know and he certainly would not share.

If someone is too political, that is a huge turnoff no matter what they believe. I recently sat behind a young man on a plane ride, and he told the older woman (who was part of some Republican group I think) next to him that he was *fascinated* by politics. I was shocked and astounded. I don't think I could easily be friends with such a person. What is there to like or enjoy about modern politics, from either side? Maybe he was jewish.
 

Veemerk

Pigeon
Woman
Protestant
I try not to talk politics with my friends and family. They are all on the “left side” except a few. I’ve even witnessed family members who once leaned right now leaning left. I wouldn’t say anyone holds extreme positions though.

I remember getting in an argument with my uncle about politics and it ruined the family time we were supposed to spend together. I also remember getting in a heated political fight with friends at a restaurant and what was meant to be a nice evening became tense and uncomfortable.

Although, I may not agree with them, I love them and we still have plenty to talk about without bringing up politics. Everyone knows how everyone feels.
 
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Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
This question has been going through my mind after spending some time last weekend with family, including my blue-haired, [email protected] sister-in-law. She claims to believe in Christ (baptized Catholic), but doesn't seem to be aware that many of her positions and world view are completely aligned with raging radicalized leftists.

In short, it may be possible for some non leftist people to be friends with leftists, depending on temperament, but I don't think it's possible for me. One thing I've noticed about leftists is that, even if we don't discuss politics at all, they just can't help but to virtue signal. And frankly, it's annoying and impossible for me to not notice.

It's like, I don't care to hear about how you got your six-year old [email protected], you sent your 2 year old to therapy, or how you believe in reusing plastic to save the planet, or how you believe not donating hair is selfish, or how you think Canada is a utopia (no offense to any Canadians, but last summer she was complaining that the US should have locked down more like Canada. I should have messed with her by bringing up a China style lockdown, because I doubt she's even aware of it.)

It's like even if we don't bring up anything blatantly political the worldview is still there. I guess it's more of a "normie" world view, but it seems nowadays they're trying to push the leftist position as the default unless one thinks for themselves, actively does research and tries to look for the truth. So it's more like it's impossible to be friends with normies, who tend to lean left.

2Cor6:14
 

Stadtaffe

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
In the last few days I decided deliberately to not make friends with one or two people who appeared to be leftists. One of them in particular was spouting some stuff repeatedly.

Feel a bit melancholic about it, cause they were okay folks in other ways, although I likely did not have that much in common with them.

You have to save yourself from yourself, and I've overdone it over the years with leftist friends, want to steer my future in a better direction.
 

Pete345

Sparrow
Orthodox
To me at least, a friend is someone who you can trust, rely on, confide in, and lean on in hard times. Leftists subvert society with immoral, demonic and authoritarian behavior. I would never be able to trust a leftist like that because leftism is a sham, built on a lie. In the past I tried to be "tolerant" of leftists and be friends with them, but they inevitably wanted to always pursue immoral paths and push others to join them. I won't surround myself with these people anymore.
 

dragonfire00

Robin
Woman
Protestant
In the past I tried to be "tolerant" of leftists and be friends with them, but they inevitably wanted to always pursue immoral paths and push others to join them. I won't surround myself with these people anymore.
Same. If they aren't themselves pursuing those paths they will still encourage it in others or hang around similar people and discuss their beliefs in front of you constantly. I have a couple friends (that lasted long because we grew up going to church together too!) that I've been slowly separating from due to this.
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
I found out the hard way, by putting my foot in my mouth, that two of my close friends were not of the same "politics", or views on abortion, etc. as mine. We attended the same church and when I first joined I stupidly thought everyone was in agreement on everything. I know I cannot and should not try to change their minds because most things like this are not my "job", but God's. After years of strain, we've learned what subjects to avoid, which are many, and to focus on what we have in common instead.
 
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