Cancelling the nation of Russia

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Ух-ты!

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911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member
Indonesia, host of the upcoming G20, resists pressure to ban Putin from being invited. They've invited Zelensky as a concession to the US/EU's request of banning Putin.

Supposedly Kadyrov is now a very popular figure in Indonesia and other parts of the muslim world, most of Indonesians are rooting for Russia in the war. This is a rare case of Putin successfully projecting soft power. Videos like this one on an Indonesian network covering the conflict from the Chechnyan brigade's side have millions of views in Indonesia, and thousands of comments like these:



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MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
I was curious about flight costs to and from Russia from various countries and just noticed that Expedia and Skyscanner don't sell flights to Russia. You have to use yandex to search for flights. However, flights to Cuba, China, Afghanistan, Australia, and Saudi Arabia are still for sale despite these nations 'human rights issues.'

These websites have pegged all Russians as bad. Maybe Ivan just wants to visit his sick grandmother in Moscow and the website wants to deny him this just to make their point.

 

MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
This popular personality test used to list Vladimir Putin as having this personality type:

https://www.16personalities.com/intj-personality (see bottom)

Archive: https://archive.ph/yGjBz (only visible in source as JavaScript is broken)

No more.

They still list George W M Ds Bush and Barry O'Droner.
I like the quiz and have shared it before. I had forgotten Putin was listed as INTJ. I also tested as having INTJ or ISTJ at various times (usually INTJ) I have taken the quiz. I think the quiz should have used more real people versus movie and book characters. Taking out Putin is ridiculous. Below is a more detailed list which includes Putin. This list is less shy about including some controversial characters.

110 Famous People With INTJ Personality Type
 

GuitarVH

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
I was looking at the professional tennis rankings of both men and women. There is a column where the flag of each player's country is displayed. For both the ATP (men) and WTA (women), if the player is from Russia or Belarus, the flag is not displayed and instead shows an empty cell. There are a lot of players from those two countries including many top 10 and top 20 players. It's an insult and travesty to pretend those countries do not exist.

Regarding the case of someone like Amanda Anisimova, who is ranked #28 in the world, her parents moved from Russia to the USA a few years before she was born so she is a US citizen. She is very Russian looking with a very Russian surname but she will not be cancelled because she is considered American. It is all very absurd. Nothing against her, she is a good up and coming player and I root for her success.

This is a demonstration of some kind of occult cancellation of two countries, pretending they don't even exist. I've never seen anything like this in my lifetime. I find it dangerous and disconcerting.



Edit - Also, another strange thing. For the WTA, they use the word "region" as the heading for the column which should say "country".
 

Going strong

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
So, the Globalists had cancelled (or better said, moved) the final of the main European football Cup, initially planned in Saint Peterburg. Instead, and "to punish the bad Russians", they gave the hosting of the final to the vibrant Globalist city of Paris. Brilliant idea? Not so fast...

Because, the final game has resulted in a disgusting circus, yesterday night in and around Paris.

In Saint Peterburg, the final would have been safe and well organised, but, in Paris, it was a catastrophic night, with hundreds of innocent people tear-gassed, and thousands of sport fans from all around the world, robbed, mugged, molested and beaten up by mobs of illegal 3d-world migrants. Welcome to Globalist land!

I mean, it's such a symbol of the current situation : the West wants to cancel Russia, but, it's the West that's agonising (crippled by mass migration and wokism), while Russia is in excellent state, better each passing day, freed from the corruption of Western businesses and hideous globalist sports (like Western European soccer).

By the way, even Ukrainians recently settled in the West, are questioning their choices in life (and the EU migration policy) after this night of migrant chaos in Parisian suburbs :

 

Stoyan

Pelican
Orthodox
Banning books is fascist, unless you are Ukrainian of course and then it is simply patriotic.


Tolstoy has been declared as an "extremist" in Federation courts.

 

Belgrano

Ostrich
Gold Member
The restaurant chain formerly known as McDonald's has successfully been relaunched under Russian ownership, and with a new name and brand:

Tasty name but no Big Mac: Russia opens rebranded McDonald's restaurants


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It might look and smell like McDonald's but now it's Vkusno & Tochka. The golden arches are gone, the Filet-O-Fish is simply a fish burger. The Big Mac has left Russia.

A new era for Russia's fast-food and economic scene dawned on Sunday, as McDonald's restaurants flung open their doors in Moscow under new Russian ownership and with the new name, which translates as "Tasty and that's it".

The unveiling of the rebranded outlets, more than three decades after the American burger giant first opened its doors in Moscow in a symbolic thaw between East and West, is once again a stark sign of a new world order. The reopenings took place on Russia Day, a holiday celebrating national pride.

The fortunes of the chain, which McDonald's sold when it exited the country over the conflict in Ukraine, could provide a test of how successfully Russia's economy can become more self-sufficient and withstand Western sanctions.

On Sunday, scores of people queued outside what was formerly McDonald's flagship restaurant in Pushkin Square, central Moscow. The outlet sported a new logo - a stylised burger with two fries - plus a slogan reading: "The name changes, love stays".

The queue was significantly smaller than the thousands of people who thronged to the original McDonald's opening there in 1990 during the Soviet era.

Vkusno & Tochka's menu was also smaller and did not offer the Big Mac and some other burgers and desserts, such as the McFlurry. A double cheeseburger was going for 129 roubles ($2.31) compared with roughly 160 under McDonald's and a fish burger for 169 roubles, compared with about 190 previously.

The composition of burgers has not changed and the equipment from McDonald's has remained, said Alexander Merkulov, quality manager at the new company.

McDonald's closed its Russian restaurants in March and said in mid-May that it had decided to leave the country altogether.

In a sign of the haste the new owners have had to rebrand in time for the launch, much of the packaging for fries and burgers was plain white, as were drink cups, while takeaway bags were plain brown. The old McDonald's logo on packets of ketchup and other sauces were covered over with makeshift black markings.

Sergei, a 15-year-old customer, saw little difference though.

"The taste has stayed the same," he said as he tucked into a chicken burger and fries. "The cola is different, but there really is no change to the burger."

The flagship Moscow restaurant is among 15 rebranded outlets that are initially opening in and around the capital on Sunday. Oleg Paroev, CEO of Vkusno & Tochka, said the company was planning to reopen 200 restaurants in Russia by the end of June and all 850 by the end of the summer.

"For three months we did not work," said Ruzanna, manager of a Moscow branch that is due to open in July. "Everyone is very pleased."

The chain will keep its old McDonald's interior but will expunge any references to its former name, said Paroev, who was appointed Russia McDonald's CEO weeks before Moscow sent tens of thousands of troops into Ukraine on Feb. 24.

"Our goal is that our guests do not notice a difference either in quality or ambience," Paroev told a media conference in the restaurant. He said the chain would keep "affordable prices", though added that prices would likely rise due to inflation, but not higher than its competitors.

Siberian businessman Alexander Govor, the new owner of the chain, told Reuters that it would look to launch something similar to McDonald's flagship Big Mac.

"We don't have the right to use some colours, we don't have the right to use the golden arches, we don't have the right to use any mention of McDonald's," he told Reuters.

"The Big Mac is the story of McDonald's. We will definitely do something similar," he said. "We will try to do something even better so that our visitors and guests like this dish."

Govor said up to 7 billion roubles ($125.56 million) would be invested this year in the business, which employs more than 50,000 people.

"The corporation asked me to, first of all, keep the headcount, to provide people with work. That's what I'm going to do," he added.

Govor said the company was looking for new suppliers of soft drinks as Coca Cola, which has said it was suspending its business in Russia.

To summarize, almost nothing has changed for customers, except the names of some food items due to association with the previous brand, and that they are still looking for a good Coca Cola substitute. On the other hand, the burgers are cheaper now and the taste is the same as before. Suppliers, logistics, infrastructure, real estate, employees, management: Same as before. After a 3 month break, operations now just resume.

Additional info:
Alexander Govor, who currently operates 25 McDonald's restaurants in Siberia, will take on the firm's restaurants and staff, operating them under a new brand, the fast food giant said.

It did not disclose the sale price, but has warned investors it would take a more than $1bn hit from the exit.

Mr Govor has been a licensee of McDonald's since 2015. He is also co-founder of Neftekhimservice, a refining company, and a board member of another firm that owns the Park Inn hotel and private clinics in Siberia.

Russia's Industry and Trade Minister Denis Manturov said the deal was the result of a "long and difficult" negotiation process and the government would provide Mr Govor with all the necessary assistance to set up operations.

The terms provide for McDonald's 62,000 staff in Russia to be retained for at least two years, with their existing pay and Mr Govor will pay the salaries of corporate staff in Russia until the deal is completed.

McDonald's will retain its trademark in the country, it said, while the restaurants will be stripped of their menu, logo and other branding.
Announcing plans for the sale earlier this week, chief executive Chris Kempczinski called the decision "extremely difficult".

"However, we have a commitment to our global community and must remain steadfast in our values. And our commitment to our values means that we can no longer keep the arches shining there," he said.

McDonald's suspended operations at the restaurants it owned in Russia in March, citing the "humanitarian crisis" and "unpredictable operating environment" caused by the Ukraine war.

The move drew outrage among Russian politicians and prompted threats the business would be seized.

Last year, Russia and Ukraine accounted for about 9% of McDonald's revenue.
 
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