Cancelling the West : Moving to the new Russia.

holgerdanske

Woodpecker
Catholic
That offer seems like a massive scam to me - imagine that list being published in the open. Even if it is legit it is highly irresponsible. Tim should be fully aware of the risks involved for anyone who would be dumb enough to send a copy of his/her passport to a complete stranger.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Kingfisher
Orthodox
That offer seems like a massive scam to me - imagine that list being published in the open. Even if it is legit it is highly irresponsible. Tim should be fully aware of the risks involved for anyone who would be dumb enough to send a copy of his/her passport to a complete stranger.
Tim Kirby is not a complete stranger. Look him up. But yes, I wouldnt send a passport scan.
 

Going strong

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
This "American Village" project sounds very interesting. But we would need much more details.

Also, I don't like very much the "fast track to Russian citizenship" advertisement. Because no-one will invest or move long-term to said village without first getting, at least, 2-year or Permanent Residency in Russia.

So the advertisement should truthfully explain, something like : "get a 2-year visa with our help, then come live in our beautiful Russian/American village - and later on, apply for Russian citizenship after just one year with us". This might work.

Russia can attract a lot of people from all over the world, people disgusted with GloboHomo. But Russia would have to massively simplify its visa processes, then.

Visa on arrival would actually be the thing to do. Because I hope and think that Russia will cut its diplomatic links, this year, with all countries that have provided weapons to Ukrainian Nazi fighters. So most foreigners will require visas on arrival.
 
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Pantheon

Robin
Orthodox
It is one thing to move to Russia physically. The most radical act is to do it inwardly, by becoming Orthodox and learning the Russian language. In Russia you will always be a westerner. The question is can you stay in the West and become Russian?
 

Yeagerist

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
Seems like there's no one here I agree with 100%

Few ears should be burning to this...

View attachment 39843



And here's some of the thoughts and fancies from the man described as "Putin's Brain"




On another note, I can't help note that this disastrous war has ticked all the boxes in the Great Reset playbook? Massive gas price hike & potential energy shortages, incoming wheat shortages, which will likely mean famine, and subsequent mass migration wave, from Africa and the Third World.

The Western NPC are (rightly) accepting Ukrainians refugees now. This will be used as a psychological grooming for them to then accept waves of brown ones in the wake of the coming 12-18 months.

It's all too comfortable for Klaus and co's agenda for it to be serendipity IMHO.

Even the people at RT have to remind Westerners that the grass isn't greener on the other side. And I would have the same assessment so far on the sort of the right-wing white folks on this forum, Orthodox or not. Most of their support for Putin rests on the presupposition that since Russia is close enough to white America in terms of appearance and culture, would it mean that Russians by and large would welcome everyone of you.

How about Belarus?

It has all the following qualities:

  • de-facto monarch, a very based leader
  • No de-ruralization or de-industrialization as in Russia
  • Thriving economy
  • National traditional cultural identity
  • Nominally Orthodox religion
  • No feminism or LBGTASS, "extended" families
  • Rejection of globohomo corporate consumerism and western degeneracy in general
  • Russkies are equal rights nationality, no rabid nationalism or Nazism or discrimination
  • The only anti-vax country in the world!
  • Independent of the west.

Personally I would prefer a strong autocrat who is independent from external infiltration, and who is responsible for everything that goes on in the country, both good and bad. The true owner of the land who takes care of his people. The monarch who is very much a public figure and holds himself accountable.

635802457264747970-AP-Belarus-Lukashenko.jpg


iu
Lukashenko's regime is a vestige of Soviet times, and if you consider yourself a true Russian monarchist you should support the claim of Grand Duchess Maria Romanov, whose restoration Putin had never even come close to fulfilling in all his years in power.
Anti-Western dictatorships aren't righteous merely because they're "based" on this or that issue. China doesn't let the Western powers infiltrate its own structure, doesn't mean its Communist overlords are servants of God. Heck just look at the latest draconian lockdowns in Shanghai over Covid.

I don't agree with this at all "Anyone can be Russian." In that case why do people have an issue with brown people flooding into the U.S. from Mexico? That means anyone can be Mexican if they speak the language and that isn't true no matter how loyal you are to the culture. I don't believe in this stuff. My cousin can speak multiple languages but he would never identify as something he isn't. Import enough of these people from other countries they can just replace that population if Russia wasn't so big. You make it sound like Japan should let in a bunch of people from everywhere, as long as they speak the language they are "Japanese." No they are not.
The difference is that the white population of the USA are all descended from European immigrants in one way or another, who only have relatively recently populated the continent (since ~1600), whereas the genetic stock of Japan is present from several thousand years.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Kingfisher
Orthodox
This "American Village" project sounds very interesting. But we would need much more details.

Also, I don't like very much the "fast track to Russian citizenship" advertisement. Because no-one will invest or move long-term to said village without first getting, at least, 2-year or Permanent Residency in Russia.

So the advertisement should truthfully explain, something like : "get a 2-year visa with our help, then come live in our beautiful Russian/American village - and later on, apply for Russian citizenship after just one year with us". This might work.

Russia can attract a lot of people from all over the world, people disgusted with GloboHomo. But Russia would have to massively simplify its visa processes, then.

Visa on arrival would actually be the thing to do. Because I hope and think that Russia will cut its diplomatic links, this year, with all countries that have provided weapons to Ukrainian Nazi fighters. So most foreigners will require visas on arrival.

He has the whole stream dedicated to it. You might want to watch it to get more details if its of any interest to you.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Kingfisher
Orthodox
It is one thing to move to Russia physically. The most radical act is to do it inwardly, by becoming Orthodox and learning the Russian language. In Russia you will always be a westerner. The question is can you stay in the West and become Russian?

I guess the only way is to move to one of the secluded Russian Old Believer or Dukhobor communities. There are a few of them across North America.
 

Stoyan

Pelican
Orthodox
It is one thing to move to Russia physically. The most radical act is to do it inwardly, by becoming Orthodox and learning the Russian language. In Russia you will always be a westerner. The question is can you stay in the West and become Russian?
This is basically my story. I would answer your question, that I stayed in the West and became Russian. I am Russian by blood, though I consider the Russian identity more as a spiritual and/or cultural thing than anything else.

I was born in the West. It was during my teen hood that I would say that I became really Russian. Then I really learned the Russian language, culture, and Orthodox religion by all myself on the internet. Before my teen hood my knowledge of the Russian language paled in comparison with the English language. The Russian culture and history was not something that I thought about all that much. And I was a quasi atheist. This is what a western public education does to someone.

I can't say for sure what prompted me to make my transformation. Perhaps it was because I became older and more mature, my thinking deepened. I realized just how little I knew about the Russian language, culture, history, religion, etc, and that was embarrassing for me. And so I embarked on a quest for my own identity. At around the time of my teen hood my parents tranferred me onto home school instead of public school system, because I was bullied by both teachers and students for rejecting the propaganda. My parents however didn't know how to run a home school so I was basically free to do what I wanted. Also around this time they purchased internet so that I could access my lessons in Khan Academy. We didn't have internet before that.

At first I started watching just Russian language tutorials on YouTube, like grammar and stuff. It was just another part of home school for me. But then I also started learning the Russian language by watching Russian songs and movies on YouTube. And I fell in love with the Russian culture, music, architecture, clothing, everything about it. My father once told me that if I really wanted to, I could learn Russian on my own, and make it into a hobby. I believe that's the key to learning anything, is to make it your hobby. And actually Russian became an obsession for me. I watched documentaries about Russian history, cultural traditions, and I went down some pretty deep rabbit holes. I listened to narrations of the poems of Pushkin and Lermontov on YouTube, I would print the transcripts and follow along to make sure that I actually understood the deep meanings behinds the lyrics, instead of just rote memorization. I think that one of the best ways to learn a language is to use songs or poetry, because the rhymes and melodies tend to stick in your head and replay themselves over and over on repeat, you don't have to exert any extra efforts in order to memorize them. And it's very fun too!

Now you may think that YouTube is not a reliable source of information for learning Russian (language, culture, history, etc), but I would say that it is simply a gold mine for this, you just need to know where and how to look. My YouTube algorithm has been trained by me to such an extent that none of the western consumerist stuff shows up on my home page, or in the reccomended videos on the side. I use ad blocking extensions too. There are like hundreds thousands of relevent songs, music videos, documentaries, lectures, etc.

And you may think that such a home study practice does not necessarily make someone who has grown up in the western society, a Russian person, but I would once again disagree. I have found some of the best educational materials on the internet about Russian culture. It is a total immersion in the Russian world. I would say that it is impossible to study such materials and not have your whole entire worldview changed as a result. I now see the world with completely different eyes after 10 years of studying this topic.

Previously I found lots of things about the western culture weird and illogical, but I just couldn't put my finger on what exactly was wrong. I was just looking at individual things. I would say that having access to another culture, it's worldview, it's mindset, can completely change the way you look at things. That's why I think so many people in the western world become NPC's, is because they only have a single frame of reference from which they look at things. They can't even imagine the possibility of a different social, cultural, ideological, spiritual, mental, etc system. They can't fathom how things can be so much different than what they're used to. I mean even just basic things like philosophy and attitudes.

I don't really participate in the western culture and/or society, apart from working my job, going to the stores and gas stations, and doing whatever the bureaucracy requires. But I have completely cut all western cultural stuff like junk food, Netflix, western music, video games, movies, restaurants, bars, etc out of my life. I have completely rejected all that stuff. My reason being that such cultural practices are neither Russian nor Orthodox. I live in the society but by my own will I do not participate in it and I mostly keep to myself and my "echo chamber".

You could say that I live as a monk. I would say that one does not necessarily have to live in a monastery in an isolated place in order to live like a monk. In fact, it is possible to live in the western society, in the big cities, like a monk. It's just harder in a sense that like, if you live in a secluded monastery the location is doing the work of filtering out the cruft for you. So there is the question are you really so pious or is your internal state dependent on your location. Whereas if you live in the middle of the society and you do not want to participate in it, then your internal state is dependent on yourself only, not on your location. It's up to you to include or exclude various activities. I just live in society and ignore it. I feel like I'm different, not from here. Almost as if I'm an alien from another planet.

Sometimes it feels like a chronic depression that the society which I idealize has not been existing on the planet for like a century now. Since one of my main goals is to pass my culture onto my next generation, it is obvious that I should be having a wife who would be on board with this. So my requirements for a spouse are narrower than most men in society. With all the regular things in the western society which corrupt women and make it difficult for men to find good wives, and also adding this additional condition, would make it a very difficult thing to do, is an understatement. So I'm beginning to feel black pilled about the situation. Religion comforts me, but one cannot be celibate forever.

In Russia you will always be a westerner.

What do you mean by this? The question is, if I move to Russia, would I be considered as a westerner by the locals, even if I don't identify with the western culture and/or civilization? Or would I be like Hiroo Onoda and consider the locals as westerners, for failing to strictly adhere to the 19th century traditional Russian culture? Maybe it is that way only in the big cities? I think that there should be conservative communities in Russia, such as Orthodox, Old Believers, Cossacks, where the traditional Russian culture still exists?
 
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Pantheon

Robin
Orthodox
This is basically my story. I would answer your question, that I stayed in the West and became Russian. I am Russian by blood, though I consider the Russian identity more as a spiritual and/or cultural thing than anything else.
Very interesting, I find myself becoming more and more Russian as well. I have mixed Slavic/Greek and Finnish blood but as you say, Russian is something greater. I am trying to sort this stuff out right now and it's quite personal for me because of my heritage and history.

I was born in the West. It was during my teen hood that I would say that I became really Russian. Then I really learned the Russian language, culture, and Orthodox religion by all myself on the internet.
Pretty impressive to do that all by yourself.

Before my teen hood my knowledge of the Russian language paled in comparison with the English language. The Russian culture and history was not something that I thought about all that much. And I was a quasi atheist. This is what a western public education does to someone.

I'm glad you returned to your roots.

I can't say for sure what prompted me to make my transformation. Perhaps it was because I became older and more mature, my thinking deepened. I realized just how little I knew about the Russian language, culture, history, religion, etc, and that was embarrassing for me.
Well, the picture of Russia we get in the West is a grey, rainy place with alcoholics on park benchs.

And so I embarked on a quest for my own identity. At around the time of my teen hood my parents tranferred me onto home school instead of public school system, because I was bullied by both teachers and students for rejecting the propaganda. My parents however didn't know how to run a home school so I was basically free to do what I wanted. Also around this time they purchased internet so that I could access my lessons in Khan Academy. We didn't have internet before that.

At first I started watching just Russian language tutorials on YouTube, like grammar and stuff. It was just another part of home school for me. But then I also started learning the Russian language by watching Russian songs and movies on YouTube. And I fell in love with the Russian culture, music, architecture, clothing, everything about it. My father once told me that if I really wanted to, I could learn Russian on my own, and make it into a hobby. I believe that's the key to learning anything, is to make it your hobby. And actually Russian became an obsession for me. I watched documentaries about Russian history, cultural traditions, and I went down some pretty deep rabbit holes. I listened to narrations of the poems of Pushkin and Lermontov on YouTube, I would print the transcripts and follow along to make sure that I actually understood the deep meanings behinds the lyrics, instead of just rote memorization. I think that one of the best ways to learn a language is to use songs or poetry, because the rhymes and melodies tend to stick in your head and replay themselves over and over on repeat, you don't have to exert any extra efforts in order to memorize them. And it's very fun too!

I will use some of those techniques. Russian has become as important a language as English for me know and I see it as a duty to learn it (and I know many on this forum feel the same).

Now you may think that YouTube is not a reliable source of information for learning Russian (language, culture, history, etc), but I would say that it is simply a gold mine for this, you just need to know where and how to look. My YouTube algorithm has been trained by me to such an extent that none of the western consumerist stuff shows up on my home page, or in the reccomended videos on the side. I use ad blocking extensions too. There are like hundreds thousands of relevent songs, music videos, documentaries, lectures, etc.

And you may think that such a home study practice does not necessarily make someone who has grown up in the western society, a Russian person, but I would once again disagree. I have found some of the best educational materials on the internet about Russian culture. It is a total immersion in the Russian world. I would say that it is impossible to study such materials and not have your whole entire worldview changed as a result. I now see the world with completely different eyes after 10 years of studying this topic.

Previously I found lots of things about the western culture weird and illogical, but I just couldn't put my finger on what exactly was wrong. I was just looking at individual things. I would say that having access to another culture, it's worldview, it's mindset, can completely change the way you look at things. That's why I think so many people in the western world become NPC's, is because they only have a single frame of reference from which they look at things. They can't even imagine the possibility of a different social, cultural, ideological, spiritual, mental, etc system. They can't fathom how things can be so much different than what they're used to. I mean even just basic things like philosophy and attitudes.

I don't really participate in the western culture and/or society, apart from working my job, going to the stores and gas stations, and doing whatever the bureaucracy requires. But I have completely cut all western cultural stuff like junk food, Netflix, western music, video games, movies, restaurants, bars, etc out of my life. I have completely rejected all that stuff. My reason being that such cultural practices are neither Russian nor Orthodox. I live in the society but by my own will I do not participate in it and I mostly keep to myself and my "echo chamber".

You could say that I live as a monk. I would say that one does not necessarily have to live in a monastery in an isolated place in order to live like a monk. In fact, it is possible to live in the western society, in the big cities, like a monk. It's just harder in a sense that like, if you live in a secluded monastery the location is doing the work of filtering out the cruft for you. So there is the question are you really so pious or is your internal state dependent on your location. Whereas if you live in the middle of the society and you do not want to participate in it, then your internal state is dependent on yourself only, not on your location. It's up to you to include or exclude various activities. I just live in society and ignore it. I feel like I'm different, not from here. Almost as if I'm an alien from another planet.

Sometimes it feels like a chronic depression that the society which I idealize has not been existing on the planet for like a century now. Since one of my main goals is to pass my culture onto my next generation, it is obvious that I should be having a wife who would be on board with this. So my requirements for a spouse are narrower than most men in society. With all the regular things in the western society which corrupt women and make it difficult for men to find good wives, and also adding this additional condition, would make it a very difficult thing to do, is an understatement. So I'm beginning to feel black pilled about the situation. Religion comforts me, but one cannot be celibate forever.

It is understandsble that you become alienated from Western society but I hope you have ways to make up for that. Obviously, the Ukrainian situation is special for all Orthodox people in the West since it accelerates the rift. But this is meant to happen and I believe it has the potential to boost Orthodoxy in the West once the dust settles. But not without difficulties.
What do you mean by this? The question is, if I move to Russia, would I be considered as a westerner by the locals, even if I don't identify with the western culture and/or civilization? Or would I be like Hiroo Onoda and consider the locals as westerners, for failing to strictly adhere to the 19th century traditional Russian culture? Maybe it is that way only in the big cities? I think that there should be conservative communities in Russia, such as Orthodox, Old Believers, Cossacks, where the traditional Russian culture still exists?
In a way, if people on this forum move to Russia they will be more Russian than the Russians themselves, but yes, what I mean is that if you are a Westerner, you will be an outsider in the sense of not being born in Russia. But if you are Orthodox and learn Russian you obviously have every chance to integrate.
 

Stoyan

Pelican
Orthodox
Pretty impressive to do that all by yourself.
I'm glad you returned to your roots.
Thank you. I think that it was easy for me to learn Russian language, culture, etc with my particular situation, as I was home schooled, and had a lot of free time. I have been studying Russian for 10 years now.

Very interesting, I find myself becoming more and more Russian as well. I have mixed Slavic/Greek and Finnish blood but as you say, Russian is something greater. I am trying to sort this stuff out right now and it's quite personal for me because of my heritage and history.

I will use some of those techniques. Russian has become as important a language as English for me know and I see it as a duty to learn it (and I know many on this forum feel the same).
That's very cool. I will post some more tips and methods about how I learned the Russian language, into the "Studying the Russian Language" thread.


I have been studying the Russian culture seriously for like 8 years. I will be posting my discoveries into the "Russia Culture General" thread.


Well, the picture of Russia we get in the West is a grey, rainy place with alcoholics on park benchs.
That sounds like New York City. Actually most big cities are like that, depressive metropolises, places of extreme wealth inequality , degeneracy, unhealthy lifestyle, and suffering. I wouldn't be surprised if Moscow and St Petersburg are like that too, at least in certain areas.

It is understandsble that you become alienated from Western society but I hope you have ways to make up for that. Obviously, the Ukrainian situation is special for all Orthodox people in the West since it accelerates the rift. But this is meant to happen and I believe it has the potential to boost Orthodoxy in the West once the dust settles. But not without difficulties.
It can be a blessing in disguise under certain circumstances. Sometimes suffering is necessary for receiving revelations. Sometimes one needs to go through alienation in order to see society for what it really is. One cannot know the true nature of the fire until one has been burned by it. Hard times can beat sense into a previously ignorant individual. Not all, but most people who have not been oppressed by society in any way, are in fact blue pilled and looking at the world through rose colored glasses. Most red pilled people have been directly or indirectly burned by society.
 

Stoyan

Pelican
Orthodox
Lukashenko's regime is a vestige of Soviet times
Lukashenko is hated by the globohomo for preserving what may as well turn out to be the last piece of Russki civilization. He has remained true to the interests of the nation and the traditions of ancestors. A true patriot. Belarus is a conservative Orthodox country. I don't know what you mean by "vestige of Soviet times". Is it because he was born and worked during the period of Soviet rule?

The Belarussian opposition is funded by glohobomo obviously. Svetlana Tihanovskaya has been linked to both Ukrainian neo-nazis as well as Federation libtards. Imagine what they would do if they would take over the country? They would destroy the industrial and agricultural economy that Lukashenko has preserved and nurtured with large efforts. They would force everyone to take certain mandatory medical procedures. They would destroy the Russian language and traditional cultural heritage. Look at what the Russian Revolution against Nicholas II did, and look at what the Ukrainian Revolution against Yanukovich did. The consequences for the country were absolutely catastrophic, bringing the Russki people to the very brink. We don't want that.
 

Tippy

Kingfisher
Other Christian
I respect this 'Russian within US' idea, though it might be a bit alienating. Is your ultimate plan to move to Russia or Belarus?
 

Stoyan

Pelican
Orthodox
and if you consider yourself a true Russian monarchist you should support the claim of Grand Duchess Maria Romanov, whose restoration Putin had never even come close to fulfilling in all his years in power.
And why would he? He wants to keep all the power to himself. Well, maybe not so much Putin himself, as the people who are backing him. Such as the oligarchs, and people who like to wear funni hats. They have gone down into the deep end, too far to go back now and share power with anyone, lest the one with whom power is shared accidentally finds out something about those people that they do not want anyone to know.

Yeah no one willingly gives up power these days. There is no Cincinnatus here. Not saying good or bad, just making an observation.
 
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