Car Self-Maintenance

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
so unless that’s considered a major issue I don’t know why the Maintenance Required light is on. It was fun to screw up the air filter cover and figure out how to fix it though.

if it's just the maintenance light and not the check engine light, here's what you do:

1) Turn the car on.
2)Hold in the trip odometer knob
3)Turn the car off but keep holding the knob in
4)turn it back on whilst still holding said knob
5) See that the light is off and let go of the knob
6) Exit the vehicle, raise your arms above your head. Your elbows should touch your ears. Jump up and down while shouting "Yota Livin!" repeatedly

I've been working on 4runners and other Toyotas since I was a little guy. Any other questions fire away.

Aloha!
 

MtnMan

Woodpecker
Is there a computer tool thingy for a '98 Mercedes? I looked into the bluetooth stuff but mine is too old but still has a computer in it.
you just need a generic OBD2 scanner, can be had all over the place. Although you are in Australia right? Not sure if the generic OBD ports were installed on your cars at that point. Here they are standard on any car 1996 and newer.
 

NoFunInAus

Kingfisher
you just need a generic OBD2 scanner, can be had all over the place. Although you are in Australia right? Not sure if the generic OBD ports were installed on your cars at that point. Here they are standard on any car 1996 and newer.
As far as I know there's no difference between Aus and UK cars so I'll see if the OBD2 scanner will work. (it's showing an airbag lamp)
 
Alright guys, I think I successfully replaced both low-beam headlights. One of them required me to move the battery out of the way, which revealed a buildup of blue-green dust near the positive terminal. What does that stuff’s presence mean, and what’s the best way to get rid of it if it’s not supposed to be there?
 
if it's just the maintenance light and not the check engine light, here's what you do:

1) Turn the car on.
2)Hold in the trip odometer knob
3)Turn the car off but keep holding the knob in
4)turn it back on whilst still holding said knob
5) See that the light is off and let go of the knob
6) Exit the vehicle, raise your arms above your head. Your elbows should touch your ears. Jump up and down while shouting "Yota Livin!" repeatedly

I've been working on 4runners and other Toyotas since I was a little guy. Any other questions fire away.

Aloha!

But is it on for a reason? I don’t think it needs more oil and everything else seems normal. All the fluid levels are fine.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
But is it on for a reason? I don’t think it needs more oil and everything else seems normal. All the fluid levels are fine.

It's a timer. Some call it the "idiot" light. I'm not saying that about you, because look what you did. You flipped the script and used it to learn auto maintenance.

Let's now call it the "WOKE" light.

World War II decimated Japan's economy. George Soros met with Hirohito to come up with a way to stabilize the yen. They needed to sell more cars, and do more mechanic work.

They put a switch in odometers that would spark a little red light on the dashboard every so many thousand miles. This way when an upper middle class Jewish woman sees this light her anxiety kicks in and she calls the dealership. "It's ok, Mrs. Goldstein, bring it in and we will fix it" they tell her when she calls.

Now they got her. On top of overcharging her for all of the things you, Michael Witicoff, just learned are easy fixes, they also line up all the shiny new cars so Mrs. Goldstein walks in and decides she needs to keep up with the Jones and buy a better car. Remember, the people who made your Toyota are the same ones who bombed Pearl Harbor.

And did you get the maintenance light to go off on your Corolla??

Aloha!
 
Ok, maybe I didn’t put the battery back entirely right. When I started the car today it was vibrating like a roller coaster cart. Lasted about ten minutes and apparently that’s common for old Toyotas, to have to recalibrate once the battery is replaced or taken out. Then everything was fine for about twenty more minutes, when all the lights went on in the driver’s side of the dashboard and the gas pedal and steering stopped working. Turned the car off and back on and that seemed to solve the problem, so I don’t know if I actually broke something or if this is just part of how an old car handles the battery being taken out and out back in.
 

Mountaineer

Pelican
Gold Member
Always remember: don't fear to take a spanner to your car. I'm not a trained mechanic, nor did I learn anything technical in school. I simply didn't have money to pay a mechanic and since I already liked cars I approached it as a learning experience. Few years later and I'm doing engine swaps and rally car builds.

Alright guys, I think I successfully replaced both low-beam headlights. One of them required me to move the battery out of the way, which revealed a buildup of blue-green dust near the positive terminal. What does that stuff’s presence mean, and what’s the best way to get rid of it if it’s not supposed to be there?
Oxidized copper. Remove what's loose and clean the connection with sandpaper.
 
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Kona

Crow
Gold Member
Ok, maybe I didn’t put the battery back entirely right. When I started the car today it was vibrating like a roller coaster cart. Lasted about ten minutes and apparently that’s common for old Toyotas, to have to recalibrate once the battery is replaced or taken out. Then everything was fine for about twenty more minutes, when all the lights went on in the driver’s side of the dashboard and the gas pedal and steering stopped working. Turned the car off and back on and that seemed to solve the problem, so I don’t know if I actually broke something or if this is just part of how an old car handles the battery being taken out and out back in.

Check and see if the terminal connectors on the battery are tight.

Aloha!
 

Tex Cruise

Pelican
It's a timer. Some call it the "idiot" light. I'm not saying that about you, because look what you did. You flipped the script and used it to learn auto maintenance.

Let's now call it the "WOKE" light.

World War II decimated Japan's economy. George Soros met with Hirohito to come up with a way to stabilize the yen. They needed to sell more cars, and do more mechanic work.

They put a switch in odometers that would spark a little red light on the dashboard every so many thousand miles. This way when an upper middle class Jewish woman sees this light her anxiety kicks in and she calls the dealership. "It's ok, Mrs. Goldstein, bring it in and we will fix it" they tell her when she calls.

Now they got her. On top of overcharging her for all of the things you, Michael Witicoff, just learned are easy fixes, they also line up all the shiny new cars so Mrs. Goldstein walks in and decides she needs to keep up with the Jones and buy a better car. Remember, the people who made your Toyota are the same ones who bombed Pearl Harbor.

And did you get the maintenance light to go off on your Corolla??

Aloha!


tenor.gif


This is some classic Kona right here.

One of the finest posts I've seen on this forum in some time.
 
Alright, successfully replaced both low-beam bulbs and the cabin air filter. Seems like these are the easiest tasks on the whole car. Next I’ll try an oil change, unless someone has a suggestion for the next thing I should do to learn the machine and its parts.
 

estraudi

Pelican
Gold Member
Cool to see you're taking car maintenance into your own hands.
Truly a skill that is transferable to many other areas either for income opportunities or perhaps as a homeowner, fixing dryers, stoves and other small appliances.

The next thing I would recommend is getting good at inspections. inspect bushings, suspension for leaks, weatherstrip seals, CV(constant velocity) joints for leaks, other parts of the engine/tranny for leaks and do it when you have time so that you sit there and take it all in and familiarize yourself with the various systems and auxiliary systems on your car. Each system and part makes it's own noise so if you're familiar with how your engine sounds at idle, revving to 3,000 rpms or at highway speeds you will learn to pinpoint just exactly where a gremlin could be coming from in the future. Saves time on diagnosing. They even have a tool, an automotive stethoscope(dirt cheap at harbor freight), that lets you touch each part with the wand to see if the part is running fine or it's on it's way out(bad bearings in alternator for instance).

Secondly, I would say to register on Toyota forums or corolla forums. Countless men before you have already done the legwork on posting DIY threads w/ related pictures about how to repair this or that on your car, replacing suspension as well as modifications and shortcuts learned by owning your exact model. RVF isn't the only invaluable forum on the intertoobz in that regard.
Plus in the future after you've familiarized yourself with the model year of your car and it's chassis code and you just HAVE to go to a mechanic for something out of your league, it would help to be able to fire off some info about your car and how you've diagnosed it and what not. Shops like knowing and working with people that take the time to help them also do their job well, and they will, if they can tell you're a guy who understands his ride and what gremlins your exact model may have came with. Remember, not every car is a 10/10 HB.

Glad you decided to pick up a wrench and dive into the marvelous world of machines. :like::like:
 
Alright guys, I think I successfully replaced both low-beam headlights. One of them required me to move the battery out of the way, which revealed a buildup of blue-green dust near the positive terminal. What does that stuff’s presence mean, and what’s the best way to get rid of it if it’s not supposed to be there?

You can also buy a cleaner and coating to spray on there to prevent it from coming back. Just have to clean it good first though.
 

Moolooman

Sparrow
So good to hear of young men fixing their own cars. Some folks are scared of modern cars with all of the computers etc, let me tell you, replacing a water pump is just replacing a water pump, whether it’s on a 1997 Civic or a 2020 911. The only thing I would stay away from is the brakes. Brakes are the easiest repair on cars, but get one small thing wrong and you’ll have a very long day. If you’re inexperienced, this is one of the few time’s I’d recommend paying a pro. You can easily kill yourself or others.

Make sure your parts are thoroughly cleaned (use gas and a paint brush to clean metal parts), make sure your gaskets are brand new and seated correctly and use some Loctite on what you think are critical parts.

Above all else, don’t rush. Take your time, slow everything down and make sure you’re left with no spare bolts. Once you’ve completed the job, you can kick back and admire your work and be proud of the knowledge you’ve gained that puts you in front of most ‘men’.
 

bucky

Ostrich
So good to hear of young men fixing their own cars. Some folks are scared of modern cars with all of the computers etc, let me tell you, replacing a water pump is just replacing a water pump, whether it’s on a 1997 Civic or a 2020 911. The only thing I would stay away from is the brakes. Brakes are the easiest repair on cars, but get one small thing wrong and you’ll have a very long day. If you’re inexperienced, this is one of the few time’s I’d recommend paying a pro. You can easily kill yourself or others.

Make sure your parts are thoroughly cleaned (use gas and a paint brush to clean metal parts), make sure your gaskets are brand new and seated correctly and use some Loctite on what you think are critical parts.

Above all else, don’t rush. Take your time, slow everything down and make sure you’re left with no spare bolts. Once you’ve completed the job, you can kick back and admire your work and be proud of the knowledge you’ve gained that puts you in front of most ‘men’.

A live streamer I listen to once claimed that his 2019 Ford Explorer won't allow him to change the battery himself. That is, if you do it, the vehicle's main computer disables the engine until the dealer enters some kind of reset code.

Not sure if that's true or a common thing in newer vehicles, but it sounds plausible with how things are going in society in general.
 

NoFunInAus

Kingfisher
A live streamer I listen to once claimed that his 2019 Ford Explorer won't allow him to change the battery himself. That is, if you do it, the vehicle's main computer disables the engine until the dealer enters some kind of reset code.

Not sure if that's true or a common thing in newer vehicles, but it sounds plausible with how things are going in society in general.
This has been true with BMW's since around 2008. Car companies used to be cool but are just like Apple now, this is why I stuck with older cars, some of which you can work on yourself. But I just found out my 98 Merc needs all kinds of computer gizmos to just get rid of an airbag light..
 
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