Christian response and guidance to coronavirus

Rigsby

Pelican
Gold Member
Talked to my mum a bit earlier on the phone.

She said that some of the Christian people in the village had been by and asked her if she needed anything.

In the past they have helped with trips to the hospital for my step-father who got crippled not so long back. They really pulled out all the stops. They even gave them a cheque for 500 quid at Christmas time!

My mum made a point of putting a fiver in the chuch pot every time she got a lift. Ok, a taxi was 20 quid, but still...

And she got all that back!

Young girls have been putting letters through the door saying if they need anything then just to phone a number.

It's very heartening. This wouldn't happen in London, well, at least not in some places in London.


It's a beautiful Church there where they live. Graves going back centuries. There is a bit of BS with some people in the hierarchy, but on the whole I've been quite impressed with what I've seen from God's own soldiers on the ground.

No one trying to take advantage. Everyone doing what they can.

My folks are safe where they are and there are certainly worse places to be.

And through these Christian acts, even the hardened old hearts of my parents have been touched.

And they even get their garden cleared, for free!


Sometimes it's the little things in life...
 
Brothers,

If men turn to God, we can take this Evil and turn it to Good. We should pray and use our talents for Him. There can be a wonderful flowering after this.

I wanted to share that even in a pozzed company like Amazon, Prime members get to see “The Greatest Story Ever Told” for free: https://www.amazon.com/Greatest-Story-Ever-Told/dp/B001EBROWQ

It’s not the best adaptation, but contains lots of direct quotes from Scripture. I found it moving and the story of Christ *is* the Greatest Story.
 
Rigsby said:
Talked to my mum a bit earlier on the phone.

She said that some of the Christian people in the village had been by and asked her if she needed anything.

In the past they have helped with trips to the hospital for my step-father who got crippled not so long back. They really pulled out all the stops. They even gave them a cheque for 500 quid at Christmas time!

My mum made a point of putting a fiver in the chuch pot every time she got a lift. Ok, a taxi was 20 quid, but still...

And she got all that back!

Young girls have been putting letters through the door saying if they need anything then just to phone a number.

It's very heartening. This wouldn't happen in London, well, at least not in some places in London.


It's a beautiful Church there where they live. Graves going back centuries. There is a bit of BS with some people in the hierarchy, but on the whole I've been quite impressed with what I've seen from God's own soldiers on the ground.

No one trying to take advantage. Everyone doing what they can.

My folks are safe where they are and there are certainly worse places to be.

And through these Christian acts, even the hardened old hearts of my parents have been touched.

And they even get their garden cleared, for free!


Sometimes it's the little things in life...

It's in those times that we see the worst in people but also the best.

People are showing their true colors and it's only the beginning.

Interesting times we are living.
 
Even though I personally enjoyed the online sermons I don't think this is sustainable and I'm surprised/not surprised so many Christians are deferring to the government and cucking out. I'm not saying we should just go straight to full blown service but I'm seeing sports fans more distressed over when games might restart than Christians over churches closed ON EASTER even.

If you are a Christian you should be very upset about this and your mind should be going overtime trying to think of some creative solution where people could attend (inside cars?) without violating the general spirit of the rules right now. So many Christians are just accepting the current situation and are just happy with online services and there's zero push back or even questioning of government regulations. And God is suppose to be the most important thing in your life? Its this kind of apathy that is infectious and makes me apathetic and want me to leave and go back to my non-religious life but at least Roosh is setting a good example I thank God for giving Roosh faith which has trickled down to me.
 

Rigsby

Pelican
Gold Member
Deusleveult said:
Rigsby said:
Talked to my mum a bit earlier on the phone.

She said that some of the Christian people in the village had been by and asked her if she needed anything.

In the past they have helped with trips to the hospital for my step-father who got crippled not so long back. They really pulled out all the stops. They even gave them a cheque for 500 quid at Christmas time!

My mum made a point of putting a fiver in the chuch pot every time she got a lift. Ok, a taxi was 20 quid, but still...

And she got all that back!

Young girls have been putting letters through the door saying if they need anything then just to phone a number.

It's very heartening. This wouldn't happen in London, well, at least not in some places in London.


It's a beautiful Church there where they live. Graves going back centuries. There is a bit of BS with some people in the hierarchy, but on the whole I've been quite impressed with what I've seen from God's own soldiers on the ground.

No one trying to take advantage. Everyone doing what they can.

My folks are safe where they are and there are certainly worse places to be.

And through these Christian acts, even the hardened old hearts of my parents have been touched.

And they even get their garden cleared, for free!


Sometimes it's the little things in life...

It's in those times that we see the worst in people but also the best.

People are showing their true colors and it's only the beginning.

Interesting times we are living.


My mother is one of those people that 'damns' God every chance she can get. She feels abandoned by him.

I have to laugh. Because I can see how she is 'damning' something, someone, some entity she does not 'believe' in.

She feels abandoned. And that is ok.

Just like Jacob wrestling with God at Peniel.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Genesis+32:22-31&version=NIV




The man asked him, “What is your name?”

“Jacob,” he answered.

28 Then the man said, “Your name will no longer be Jacob, but Israel,[a] because you have struggled with God and with humans and have overcome.”

29 Jacob said, “Please tell me your name.”

But he replied, “Why do you ask my name?” Then he blessed him there.

30 So Jacob called the place Peniel, saying, “It is because I saw God face to face, and yet my life was spared.”



Slightly different thing maybe, or not. I don't know. I know nothing. I'm just grasping.


I do know that in the deepest darkness my family ever faced, the Christian lads were there to pick up the slack. Taxis to the hospital where my step-father was ran to like 80 bucks return journey. And that was a journey that needed to be made every day to someone at death's door. And without fail, they turned up, would not take payment.

It would have been rude for my mum not to put that fiver in to the pot. But still, them giving such a handout at Christmas was not just a monetary gesture. It went beyond that. I don't need to explain.

It brought a tear to their eyes. And for once, not tears of pain or angst or anguish. Something else.

And I felt validated/vindicated in some way. Some small way. For my faith. Even though I don't have belief.

And it brought a little tear to my eye as well.

For every charlatan or chancer or grifter that uses the Lord's name in vain to further their little games, there are good men on the ground that restore faith, not just in humanity, but something higher as well.

When I get better I hope to go and see them and offer up some work for them should the Church need it. I'm happy to tend gardens or cook food or do whatever I can.

I'm a non-believer when it comes down to it. But if I find God in the process, I'll be more than happy.

This whole God thing is quite the contradiction. Quite the paradox. How can we battle with and blame that which we do not believe in? I believe that is what the whole parable of Jacob at Peniel is about.

So I have time and understanding for those that discount God, but at least accept his existence in some way. They are angry with 'him'.

This is not something that can be rushed or forced.
 

Athanasius

Kingfisher
Happy Easter everyone. Christ has overcome the world. He is risen indeed.

Two versions of a modern classic, one by the late great Keith Green, the other by 2nd Chapter of Acts (Annie Herring of that seminal group wrote the song).


 
Rigsby said:
This whole God thing is quite the contradiction. Quite the paradox. How can we battle with and blame that which we do not believe in? I believe that is what the whole parable of Jacob at Peniel is about.

So I have time and understanding for those that discount God, but at least accept his existence in some way. They are angry with 'him'.

This is not something that can be rushed or forced.

You're touching something really interesting.

I've came across a lot of people who say they don't believe in God.

They all say something like this : "If there's a God, why would he let bad things happen?"

What they're really saying is this : "If there's a God and he is my Father, why hasn't he done anything when I was hurt and needed him the most?"

So they know that deep down there's God and he is our Father.

They're just hurt child feeling abandoned and like you said "angry at him".

All they need is just one sign of love from Our father above and they will gladly come back to his arms.

But it doesn't seem to work like that from my experience.
It looks like you have to come to him, surrender to him.
It's a really hard step to make that a lot of people don't want to do because of pride : "he wasn't there for me when I needed him the most, so fuck him, I don't need him".

Actually we are all hurt child here on this earth.

I've always wondered why some people do surrender naturally to him from a very young age and become Saints, why for some it takes more time and dedication but eventually do and why some will always reject him and are angry at him all their lives?

Does he really give more graces to some and nothing to others?
I'll always wonder about that.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
rotekz said:
I hope that Christians that choose to care for sufferers of CV wear appropriate protection. Especially clergy. Surely they have a duty to their flock to take reasonable precautions to stay alive and not spread it themselves? Deliberately interacting without protections i.e. placing the matter in God's hands, particularly for elderly Christians, could be seen as banging on the doors of heaven in a form of suicidal martyrdom.
I think you keep the churches and services open, but keep the elderly and vulnerable away for a month or two, and the locales well ventilated.
 

Blade Runner

Kingfisher
jakester318 said:
This is an interesting time both in human history but also in Church history. I believe that most denominations have long abandoned critical thinking and certainly the truth passed on to us from both Christ and the disciples.

I have been a Christian for about 19 years, with periods of trials here and there where I strayed from my confession. But in all of my years of being in the Church and being a part of many communities of professing believers, it's rare to find people who are thoughtful and have a deep and profound understanding of the faith. Most people I've interacted with in the Church have a very surface level understanding of what Christ taught.

My point is this: if most churches and parishioners are as shallow as I think they are, then when the government tells them they cannot congregate, they comply because their understanding of Romans 13 is to be good citizens and do what we are told. But I argue that there is a context to be understood with respect to submitting to government authority. When the disciples were told that they were to stop preaching the gospel, they replied: "which is right to you in God's eyes, that we should listen to you or God? You be the judge. But for us, we cannot stop preaching what we have seen and heard." I wonder if you would find such boldness in churches today for fear that they were in violation of Romans 13.
I have thought similar things and am praying for wisdom. It is curious, at the very least, that this "path of least resistance" also is a way to avoid suffering. I have not come to a conclusion, but being an American I have also thought long on who we claim as forefathers and how we honor them, yet we rarely talk about what sacrifices they had to make to give us this great country, and how they were "revolutionaries" in order to create it. I am not calling for revolution with these statements per se, but rather to reflect on what "freedom" --- which America and its citizens have held in such regard, or so we are taught --- there is when we supposedly have it, but then it it is taken away? I understand that there are reasons to be shrewd and clever in dealing with the government, if you are under one which is [fairly] explicitly dictatorial (such as the Soviet system), but we do not have a system even close to proclaiming such a state.

I offer these thoughts in the hope that more will contemplate them over time. Perhaps I am not being as charitable as I ought, and things will become more clear and solid as far as the way people react, if this is ongoing. In any event, we shall see what course we are on, I imagine, in the not-too-distant future.
 

Rigsby

Pelican
Gold Member
Deusleveult said:
Rigsby said:
This whole God thing is quite the contradiction. Quite the paradox. How can we battle with and blame that which we do not believe in? I believe that is what the whole parable of Jacob at Peniel is about.

So I have time and understanding for those that discount God, but at least accept his existence in some way. They are angry with 'him'.

This is not something that can be rushed or forced.

You're touching something really interesting.

I've came across a lot of people who say they don't believe in God.

They all say something like this : "If there's a God, why would he let bad things happen?"

What they're really saying is this : "If there's a God and he is my Father, why hasn't he done anything when I was hurt and needed him the most?"

So they know that deep down there's God and he is our Father.

They're just hurt child feeling abandoned and like you said "angry at him".

All they need is just one sign of love from Our father above and they will gladly come back to his arms.

But it doesn't seem to work like that from my experience.
It looks like you have to come to him, surrender to him.
It's a really hard step to make that a lot of people don't want to do because of pride : "he wasn't there for me when I needed him the most, so fuck him, I don't need him".

Actually we are all hurt child here on this earth.

I've always wondered why some people do surrender naturally to him from a very young age and become Saints, why for some it takes more time and dedication but eventually do and why some will always reject him and are angry at him all their lives?

Does he really give more graces to some and nothing to others?
I'll always wonder about that.

I think this is the major stumbling block when it comes to finally giving in and accepting 'faith' or however you want to put it.

And it's a hard question to answer. To be answered.

I have no answers and even for me this question has not been answered, either. I have my ideas. I stumble, I fall, I try to pick up best I can when I can.

We are such little ant-brained humans. Yet we are made in God's image, right? At least Jesus was made in God's image? I think. IIRC.

So how can we know God's will? Who are we to even question?

I don't want to get too deep here. I'm not a scholar with this stuff. It's not really my place to argue any of this. I've said enough already and probably shown my great ignorance.


Back to the thread title and the question of Christian response and guidance. Well, I've given some examples of that. But tonight, I talked to my mum on the phone and she said that she had been sent letters asking for donations by the local hospice. So she gave them 50 quid. I thought that was nice. She also told me she gave a similar amount back to the local Church. Again, I thought that was nice. No, it's not giving the whole amount back, nor half of it, but it's a decent gesture that many would not make. I was proud of the old boomer narcs, I must admit!

I mean, it's not like they are making their peace with God, or even trying to raise social standing. It was just the right thing to do, a small gesture - all that was needed. I really was proud of them.

My mother is a covert narc and my step-dad is an overt one. They make a great pair. But it's hard to be heartless when you see them at the end of their days, pretty much abandoned by society (but not by God it would seem). Such a brutal thing to go through. To lose a healthy son who you think will be there to look after you in old age, then for your husband to end up in a wheelchair (after very nearly dying) just some weeks later.

Now, ask God! Why? Why me?

Just like all those other poor saps in the hospital wards.

18 year old girls, ashen, pale and drained. And with that look that you never forget - might as well be tattooed on their foreheads: Why me?

Life comes at you fast.

You only have yourself. Your family. Your community. In that order. And that is where charity comes in I think. Charity is where it's at. It's for the strong to dole out to the weak. Without any kind of usury involved.

My mum made previous donations to the hospice as well where my brother was. A lot of his stuff was sold off and the proceeds given to them.

My mum would gather old clothes and whatever she could to donate to the famines in Ethiopia in the 70's. Remember that, Latch Key Kiddies?

Very few other people did. Not bad for a narcissistic old boomer.

They aren't 'bad' people. They think they are 'good' people. But they aren't. But they aren't 'bad' either.

I made a promise to my dying brother when he held me in his arms, to look after our mother. So it's something I will keep.


It was quite an effort and took quite a bit of wrangling and money to get him buried in a local Church yard. I visited his grave the other day for the first time.

The 'vicar' is a woman. And she don't see eye to eye with my mum. But then again, who does?

I explained that these people are just stewards. And that these places change hands.

Two years later and his grave has still not 'settled'. I know why.

The Church is kind of pozzed, but it's still not too bad. It's all we have to work with. I may not be a Christian in the strictest sense of the word, but these people have my most nearest and dearest at hand in their stewardship.

Hopefully I can go out and make some kind of difference later maybe. Volunteering of some sort. I don't know. Just something. I would find it rewarding and some kind of way to make up for the great failure that is me and my life.

But there is only so much I can do.

I am still deeply haunted and not a little traumatised by the short time I spent in the hospice.

It shook me to my core. It took my legs from under me. It stoned me to my soul.

After a lifetime of thinking I was strong. That I was someone that could help the weak. That I was a 'good' person. I realised just how weak and lame I really was. It held a big shiny mirror up to my face. And I didn't like what I saw: a weak, blank, inconsequential man.

I would have liked to be strong. To be the 'tough' one. To be the one that others looked to for comfort. But I was fucking wrecked.

Then again, I think that was the plan. There were a few things I wasn't warned about and I should have been by any metric of decency. But there you go. You can choose your friends but you can't choose your family...

Still I forgive.

I've never felt so little or so belittled as that day in the hospice. It was only a matter of hours really. Hours that change the course of the rest of my life. But that was probably my fault and no fault of the great warriors there dealing with a hell of a situation.

It's not a job I could do. I won't ever set foot in a hospice again - I'll make damn sure of that. I never should have set foot in there to begin with. I was not prepared for what was about to greet me.

Hopefully I can find some kind of way to help out those in need. Provide some kind of charity where it makes a difference. Christian or not. It's still a Christian act and should be aspired to.

Some men can go to war, fight on a battle field. I'm not one of them. I'm not cut from that kind of cloth.

Some men can tend to the sick and the dying in a hospice. I'm not one of them. I'm not cut from that kind of cloth.


So what kind of use am I as a human being?

Just what kind of cloth am I cut from?


If all I am able to do is end up scrubbing shitty toilets or cooking some nice meals, or maybe cutting someone's lawn, then I will humbly and gladly accept that as my fate, and be thankful, that I have finally found my place, able in some way to make a difference, to those that need it, in their hour of need.


There is no higher calling.

For such a lowly man as me.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
Deusleveult said:
So they know that deep down there's God and he is our Father.

They're just hurt child feeling abandoned and like you said "angry at him".

All they need is just one sign of love from Our father above and they will gladly come back to his arms.

But it doesn't seem to work like that from my experience.
It looks like you have to come to him, surrender to him.
It's a really hard step to make that a lot of people don't want to do because of pride : "he wasn't there for me when I needed him the most, so fuck him, I don't need him".
I only just had some of these thoughts, so bear with me, this may have application, or it may not:

38. Then answered him certain of the Scribes and Pharisees, saying, Master we would see a sign from thee.
39. Who answered, and said to them: The wicked and adulterous generation seeketh a sign: and a sign shall not be given it, but the sign of Jonas the Prophet.
40. For as *Jonas was in the whale's belly three days and three nights: so shall the Son of man be in the heart of the earth three days and three nights.
--Matthew, 12:38-40

Now, the simplest reading is "Oh, Jesus is prophesising his three days dead and then rising from the grave." Which is true - but I now think it may have more. Because Jonah's story has something more to it.

Jonah in the Old Testament book that bears his name is asked by God to go to the city of Nineveh and warn it of impending destruction if it doesn't change its ways. Jonah refuses that call and flees God, so it seems, running halfway across the world, over land, and finally, over the sea.

God sends a storm to belay Jonah's ship, and the sailors realise it's Jonah's presence that's causing the tempest. (Indeed, Jonah himself tells them to do it because he knows the storm is from God and indeed has told the sailors he's running from God.)
So he is thrown overboard, at which point the storm disappears. Jonah, meanwhile, is saved by being swallowed by a giant fish.

It's only in the absolute darkness of the fish's belly, with the rest of the world finally out of the way, completely alone, that Jonah finally prays to God in his affliction, commits to thanksgiving, and agrees to do what God asks. At that moment, he is vomited up by the great fish onto the shores at Nineveh, and goes forth to bring God's word to the city. Doing so, Jonah saves tens of thousands of people from God's wrath, because the people of Nineveh listen to him and do penance for their sins.

For the evil and adulterous generation, no sign is given it. Prophet after prophet comes with God's word and is murdered or ignored; there are none so blind as those who will not see. Understand, Jonah is not an atheist or an agnostic. He knows God exists, the Lord has spoken to him direct, has asked him to do something. Jonah has known from his birth that God is everywhere, he cannot be fled, he put a pillar of fire before the Israelites and opened a sea before them. But still he runs. We are never given a reason for why Jonah flees.

And yet, even then: God does not abandon the faithless. Or the adulterous. No sign is given them but the sign of Jonah. God pursues them. He doesn't stop looking for them. He doesn't stop trying to find them. And for some of those people, one trial after another befalls them until, at last, if given the grace, they surrender to God's will.

God does not stop searching, until we finally turn, and say:

Father.
Here I am.


God bless all the faithless, all those who do not believe in Him. God guide them all back to himself, God grant them all the graces necessary to hear Him.
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
Paracelsus said:
Deusleveult said:
So they know that deep down there's God and he is our Father.

They're just hurt child feeling abandoned and like you said "angry at him".

All they need is just one sign of love from Our father above and they will gladly come back to his arms.

But it doesn't seem to work like that from my experience.
It looks like you have to come to him, surrender to him.
It's a really hard step to make that a lot of people don't want to do because of pride : "he wasn't there for me when I needed him the most, so fuck him, I don't need him".
I only just had some of these thoughts, so bear with me, this may have application, or it may not:

38. Then answered him certain of the Scribes and Pharisees, saying, Master we would see a sign from thee.
39. Who answered, and said to them: The wicked and adulterous generation seeketh a sign: and a sign shall not be given it, but the sign of Jonas the Prophet.
40. For as *Jonas was in the whale's belly three days and three nights: so shall the Son of man be in the heart of the earth three days and three nights.
--Matthew, 12:38-40

Now, the simplest reading is "Oh, Jesus is prophesising his three days dead and then rising from the grave." Which is true - but I now think it may have more. Because Jonah's story has something more to it.

Jonah in the Old Testament book that bears his name is asked by God to go to the city of Nineveh and warn it of impending destruction if it doesn't change its ways. Jonah refuses that call and flees God, so it seems, running halfway across the world, over land, and finally, over the sea.

God sends a storm to belay Jonah's ship, and the sailors realise it's Jonah's presence that's causing the tempest. (Indeed, Jonah himself tells them to do it because he knows the storm is from God and indeed has told the sailors he's running from God.)
So he is thrown overboard, at which point the storm disappears. Jonah, meanwhile, is saved by being swallowed by a giant fish.

It's only in the absolute darkness of the fish's belly, with the rest of the world finally out of the way, completely alone, that Jonah finally prays to God in his affliction, commits to thanksgiving, and agrees to do what God asks. At that moment, he is vomited up by the great fish onto the shores at Nineveh, and goes forth to bring God's word to the city. Doing so, Jonah saves tens of thousands of people from God's wrath, because the people of Nineveh listen to him and do penance for their sins.

For the evil and adulterous generation, no sign is given it. Prophet after prophet comes with God's word and is murdered or ignored; there are none so blind as those who will not see. Understand, Jonah is not an atheist or an agnostic. He knows God exists, the Lord has spoken to him direct, has asked him to do something. Jonah has known from his birth that God is everywhere, he cannot be fled, he put a pillar of fire before the Israelites and opened a sea before them. But still he runs. We are never given a reason for why Jonah flees.

And yet, even then: God does not abandon the faithless. Or the adulterous. No sign is given them but the sign of Jonah. God pursues them. He doesn't stop looking for them. He doesn't stop trying to find them. And for some of those people, one trial after another befalls them until, at last, if given the grace, they surrender to God's will.

God does not stop searching, until we finally turn, and say:

Father.
Here I am.


God bless all the faithless, all those who do not believe in Him. God guide them all back to himself, God grant them all the graces necessary to hear Him.
Jonah is a great story. I can relate to Jonah as a rebellious teenager. He gets so mad that the people of Nineveh repent and are spared after just one warning from Jonah. He can't see that despite them being "more evil" they take just one prompting for correction, whereas Jonah rebels up to the point where his life is nearly ended.

The bible project does a summary I like


and the top comment is from an atheist Jew...who may have just seen himself in Jonah.
 
Rigsby said:
Deusleveult said:
Rigsby said:
This whole God thing is quite the contradiction. Quite the paradox. How can we battle with and blame that which we do not believe in? I believe that is what the whole parable of Jacob at Peniel is about.

So I have time and understanding for those that discount God, but at least accept his existence in some way. They are angry with 'him'.

This is not something that can be rushed or forced.

You're touching something really interesting.

I've came across a lot of people who say they don't believe in God.

They all say something like this : "If there's a God, why would he let bad things happen?"

What they're really saying is this : "If there's a God and he is my Father, why hasn't he done anything when I was hurt and needed him the most?"

So they know that deep down there's God and he is our Father.

They're just hurt child feeling abandoned and like you said "angry at him".

All they need is just one sign of love from Our father above and they will gladly come back to his arms.

But it doesn't seem to work like that from my experience.
It looks like you have to come to him, surrender to him.
It's a really hard step to make that a lot of people don't want to do because of pride : "he wasn't there for me when I needed him the most, so fuck him, I don't need him".

Actually we are all hurt child here on this earth.

I've always wondered why some people do surrender naturally to him from a very young age and become Saints, why for some it takes more time and dedication but eventually do and why some will always reject him and are angry at him all their lives?

Does he really give more graces to some and nothing to others?
I'll always wonder about that.

I think this is the major stumbling block when it comes to finally giving in and accepting 'faith' or however you want to put it.

And it's a hard question to answer. To be answered.

I have no answers and even for me this question has not been answered, either. I have my ideas. I stumble, I fall, I try to pick up best I can when I can.

We are such little ant-brained humans. Yet we are made in God's image, right? At least Jesus was made in God's image? I think. IIRC.

So how can we know God's will? Who are we to even question?

I don't want to get too deep here. I'm not a scholar with this stuff. It's not really my place to argue any of this. I've said enough already and probably shown my great ignorance.


Back to the thread title and the question of Christian response and guidance. Well, I've given some examples of that. But tonight, I talked to my mum on the phone and she said that she had been sent letters asking for donations by the local hospice. So she gave them 50 quid. I thought that was nice. She also told me she gave a similar amount back to the local Church. Again, I thought that was nice. No, it's not giving the whole amount back, nor half of it, but it's a decent gesture that many would not make. I was proud of the old boomer narcs, I must admit!

I mean, it's not like they are making their peace with God, or even trying to raise social standing. It was just the right thing to do, a small gesture - all that was needed. I really was proud of them.

My mother is a covert narc and my step-dad is an overt one. They make a great pair. But it's hard to be heartless when you see them at the end of their days, pretty much abandoned by society (but not by God it would seem). Such a brutal thing to go through. To lose a healthy son who you think will be there to look after you in old age, then for your husband to end up in a wheelchair (after very nearly dying) just some weeks later.

Now, ask God! Why? Why me?

Just like all those other poor saps in the hospital wards.

18 year old girls, ashen, pale and drained. And with that look that you never forget - might as well be tattooed on their foreheads: Why me?

Life comes at you fast.

You only have yourself. Your family. Your community. In that order. And that is where charity comes in I think. Charity is where it's at. It's for the strong to dole out to the weak. Without any kind of usury involved.

My mum made previous donations to the hospice as well where my brother was. A lot of his stuff was sold off and the proceeds given to them.

My mum would gather old clothes and whatever she could to donate to the famines in Ethiopia in the 70's. Remember that, Latch Key Kiddies?

Very few other people did. Not bad for a narcissistic old boomer.

They aren't 'bad' people. They think they are 'good' people. But they aren't. But they aren't 'bad' either.

I made a promise to my dying brother when he held me in his arms, to look after our mother. So it's something I will keep.


It was quite an effort and took quite a bit of wrangling and money to get him buried in a local Church yard. I visited his grave the other day for the first time.

The 'vicar' is a woman. And she don't see eye to eye with my mum. But then again, who does?

I explained that these people are just stewards. And that these places change hands.

Two years later and his grave has still not 'settled'. I know why.

The Church is kind of pozzed, but it's still not too bad. It's all we have to work with. I may not be a Christian in the strictest sense of the word, but these people have my most nearest and dearest at hand in their stewardship.

Hopefully I can go out and make some kind of difference later maybe. Volunteering of some sort. I don't know. Just something. I would find it rewarding and some kind of way to make up for the great failure that is me and my life.

But there is only so much I can do.

I am still deeply haunted and not a little traumatised by the short time I spent in the hospice.

It shook me to my core. It took my legs from under me. It stoned me to my soul.

After a lifetime of thinking I was strong. That I was someone that could help the weak. That I was a 'good' person. I realised just how weak and lame I really was. It held a big shiny mirror up to my face. And I didn't like what I saw: a weak, blank, inconsequential man.

I would have liked to be strong. To be the 'tough' one. To be the one that others looked to for comfort. But I was fucking wrecked.

Then again, I think that was the plan. There were a few things I wasn't warned about and I should have been by any metric of decency. But there you go. You can choose your friends but you can't choose your family...

Still I forgive.

I've never felt so little or so belittled as that day in the hospice. It was only a matter of hours really. Hours that change the course of the rest of my life. But that was probably my fault and no fault of the great warriors there dealing with a hell of a situation.

It's not a job I could do. I won't ever set foot in a hospice again - I'll make damn sure of that. I never should have set foot in there to begin with. I was not prepared for what was about to greet me.

Hopefully I can find some kind of way to help out those in need. Provide some kind of charity where it makes a difference. Christian or not. It's still a Christian act and should be aspired to.

Some men can go to war, fight on a battle field. I'm not one of them. I'm not cut from that kind of cloth.

Some men can tend to the sick and the dying in a hospice. I'm not one of them. I'm not cut from that kind of cloth.


So what kind of use am I as a human being?

Just what kind of cloth am I cut from?


If all I am able to do is end up scrubbing shitty toilets or cooking some nice meals, or maybe cutting someone's lawn, then I will humbly and gladly accept that as my fate, and be thankful, that I have finally found my place, able in some way to make a difference, to those that need it, in their hour of need.


There is no higher calling.

For such a lowly man as me.

I think going on a walking pilgrimage and staying in monasteries on the way can help you out for what feels like a lack of purpose in your life.

It might not give you your vocation, but it can open a door or kickstart something greater in your life that the everyday routine can't.

I know it did help me and change me tremendously so I encourage everybody to do that.
 

PainPositive

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Samseau said:
I think the correct solution to this is "drive-in mass."

It's an airborne virus, so keep people in cars while watching in a parking lot.

Then, for communion, the priest (wearing a facemask) can go up to each car and administer Communion.

I flat out reject the idea that the Communion can spread disease, being the body and blood of Christ. There is nothing to fear there. The rest of the sermon, however, is at risk unless the above steps are taken in precaution.
I have always wondered if Catholics believe that it's the actual blood and body of Christ why are they eating it? If a piece of Christ's calf meat were on the table and his literal blood was in a cup you'd drink it? I've taken communion and always thought it tasted like wine. Where does this come from?
 

Mountaineer

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Georgia: Crowds on Orthodox Easter despite restrictions

Georgia declared a state of emergency, introduced a curfew at night, and imposed a ban on gathering more than three people to stop the spread of the virus. But under the influence of the clergy, the government allowed Easter services.

Elijah II, Georgian Catholic Patriarch, head of the Georgian Orthodox Church, led the service at the Holy Trinity Cathedral in Tbilisi, one of the world's largest Orthodox Christian churches. About two hundred faithful attended the service, which ended with a resurrection procession.

- With the help of the Lord, thanks to the efforts of our doctors and authorities, the pandemic did not lead to serious consequences in our country - said the patriarch during the service. - By God's will, Georgia and the whole world will soon overcome this test - he added.

There have been 388 cases of coronavirus and four deaths due to COVID-19 in Georgia. This is one of the lowest statistics in Europe, but Georgian doctors warn that healthcare will not cope with a large outbreak.

Top Georgian doctors expressed outrage at the decision to gather at Easter. They usually attract crowds of people. Medics are concerned that celebrations can significantly increase the extent of coronavirus spread. In an emotional television appearance, Paata Imnadz, deputy director of the Georgian National Center for Disease Control, asked citizens not to "go to churches." He warned that the number of victims would increase significantly. "We can't survive if we don't stay at home," he explained.

Georgian president Salome Zurabishvili and prime minister Giorgi Gacharia said last week that they would not take part in the Easter festivities despite their long tradition. In turn, Health Minister Ekaterine Tikaradze admitted last week that there are not enough staff in hospitals in Georgia to cope with the possible admission of thousands of severely ill patients.
https://www.rp.pl/Koronawirus-SARS-...-w-prawoslawna-Wielkanoc-mimo-ograniczen.html
 

Roosh

Cardinal
PainPositive said:
Samseau said:
I think the correct solution to this is "drive-in mass."

It's an airborne virus, so keep people in cars while watching in a parking lot.

Then, for communion, the priest (wearing a facemask) can go up to each car and administer Communion.

I flat out reject the idea that the Communion can spread disease, being the body and blood of Christ. There is nothing to fear there. The rest of the sermon, however, is at risk unless the above steps are taken in precaution.
I have always wondered if Catholics believe that it's the actual blood and body of Christ why are they eating it? If a piece of Christ's calf meat were on the table and his literal blood was in a cup you'd drink it? I've taken communion and always thought it tasted like wine. Where does this come from?
It's not the blood and body in our material understanding of the sense... God wouldn't want us to gnaw on actual flesh, and the bread and wine never stop tasting like bread and wine, but the spiritual essence of the bread and wine is the actual blood and body of Christ. In other words, God sees us drinking his blood and eating his flesh when we receive communion, and that brings us closer to Him, but to our very limited perceptions, it has the outward structure of bread and wine.
 
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