Classic Films You've Never Seen

Salinger

Woodpecker
What are some classic films (pre 2000) you haven't seen that are at the top of your "must-see" list?

Mine:
1. Seven Samurai (1957) - I'm almost embarrassed to say that I've never seen this one.
2. Dr. Strangelove (1964) - The trailer turned me off, but Kubrick is one of my favorite directors so I'd like to give it a chance.
3. Das Boot (1981) - I remember watching a few scenes of this nail-biter back in the 80s and being impressed, but never got to see the entire film.
4. Lawerence of Arabia (1962) - I love epics and supposedly this fits the bill.
5. Rashoman (1950) - Another classic Asian film to add to the list.
 

Max Roscoe

Kingfisher
I'd like to see Lawrence of Arabia and Gone With The Wind. Two epic films. I tried to watch GWWW several years back and either I wasn't in the mood or modernity has ruined my attention span because I just couldn't get into it, but it's a film others truly appreciate. I feel like it will be "cancelled" now, just because it shows characters from the "evil" Confederacy without depicting them as demons.

Birth of a Nation - I'm curious what all this hemming and hawwing about the KKK, a group that has never existed to my knowledge, in my lifetime, was really about.

Triumph of the Will - 1935 film made during the positive years of the new German Reich, prior to war breaking out. Both these last 2 have not been fully scrubbed from memory as they are noted to be phenomenal films from a filmmaking perspective--otherwise they would be eradicated from our history.

I did just see the Hollywood film Gaslight, which is where the term for making someone feel that they are going crazy when they are really not -- psychological manipulation -- originated. (The term is overused and misused today, often in political talk). It was good, and I'd like to see more from the days when Hollywood wasn't Jewed AF.
 
I really liked Andrzej Wadja's war trilogy films from the 50s. They have a mortality that has faded nowadays, yet were groundbreaking in their production and effects.

1. A Generation (1955) - First in the series, its a story about two men dealing with the German occupation of Warsaw. Notable as Wadja used real machine gun fire as automatic weapons couldn't fire blanks. It was also the first film to use "squibs" and (literally condoms with a firecracker). As such its got a production value that looks well ahead of its time.
2. Kanal (1956) - My favorite of the trilogy. Bombed out Warsaw, sewer guerrilla fighting, and cute Polish girls. Its a movie about the Polish resistance fighting the German army while the Russians have the city sieged. I think this is the first 10 minutes below:
3. Ashes and Diamonds (1958) - The last film of the trilogy looks at the impact of rising Communism in Poland. It's a well made end that completes the evolution from occupation to Communist factions. Honestly my least favorite but still compelling.
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
What are some classic films (pre 2000) you haven't seen that are at the top of your "must-see" list?

Mine:
1. Seven Samurai (1957) - I'm almost embarrassed to say that I've never seen this one.
2. Dr. Strangelove (1964) - The trailer turned me off, but Kubrick is one of my favorite directors so I'd like to give it a chance.
3. Das Boot (1981) - I remember watching a few scenes of this nail-biter back in the 80s and being impressed, but never got to see the entire film.
4. Lawerence of Arabia (1962) - I love epics and supposedly this fits the bill.
5. Rashoman (1950) - Another classic Asian film to add to the list.
I watched 1, 2 and 5 back when Netflix was 'new' and it was DVDs and you could get virtually any movie. They all are great, well Rashomon is probably OK.

If you like Seven Samurai, watch Yojimbo and then watch Last Man Standing with Bruce Willis and a Fist Full of Dollars with Clint Eastwood for 2 american remakes of the same film. Both of the latter american films actually seemed better to me after knowing the Yojimbo plot.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
I watched 1, 2 and 5 back when Netflix was 'new' and it was DVDs and you could get virtually any movie. They all are great, well Rashomon is probably OK.

If you like Seven Samurai, watch Yojimbo and then watch Last Man Standing with Bruce Willis and a Fist Full of Dollars with Clint Eastwood for 2 american remakes of the same film. Both of the latter american films actually seemed better to me after knowing the Yojimbo plot.
The Clint Eastwood movie to watch is The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly. I've never seen Fistful of Dollars, but I'm sure it's decent as Leone never made a bad movie, but The Good, The Bad might be the greatest movie of all time. As far as the The Last Man Standing, it shouldn't be mentioned in the same sentence, but don't take me word for it, just read Ebert's review. The movie was God awful.

"Last Man Standing is such a desperately cheerless film, so dry and laconic and wrung out, that you wonder if the filmmakers ever thought that in any way it could be ... fun. It contains elements that are often found in entertainments — things like guns, gangs and spectacular displays of death — but here they crouch on the screen and growl at the audience. Even the movie's hero is bad company. ... The victory at the end is downbeat, and there is an indifference to it. This is such a sad, lonely movie."
 

username

Ostrich
Gold Member
I don't know about must see but a few I haven't seen but hear mentioned a lot:
Casablanca, Gone with the Wind, Seven Samurai, Alien, all of the Rocky movies, Taxi Driver, Dr. Strangelove and a bunch more.
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
The Clint Eastwood movie to watch is The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly. I've never seen Fistful of Dollars, but I'm sure it's decent as Leone never made a bad movie, but The Good, The Bad might be the greatest movie of all time. As far as the The Last Man Standing, it shouldn't be mentioned in the same sentence, but don't take me word for it, just read Ebert's review. The movie was God awful.

"Last Man Standing is such a desperately cheerless film, so dry and laconic and wrung out, that you wonder if the filmmakers ever thought that in any way it could be ... fun. It contains elements that are often found in entertainments — things like guns, gangs and spectacular displays of death — but here they crouch on the screen and growl at the audience. Even the movie's hero is bad company. ... The victory at the end is downbeat, and there is an indifference to it. This is such a sad, lonely movie."
Good Bad and the Ugly is also one of my favorite movies, but its also on TV all of the time so I didn't think it would fit under "classic movies you've never seen"

Also, the review of Last Man Standing, supports what I said in my post. Watch Yojimbo first, then last man standing. If you watch Last Man Standing without being familiar with Yojimbo you lose a lot. I guess Ebert was too busy getting fat instead of understanding that the movie was a remake/homage to another dark, cheerless movie with a downbeat ending and an indifferent anti-hero.

Fistfull of dollars is the same way, Eastwood's "man with no name" character across the trilogy is also modelled on the Sanjuro/nameless ronin character from Kurosawa's films.

Its the same thing with Kurosawa's "the hidden fortress" and Star Wars. Though the hidden fortress isn't the best movie, you watch it and you can see where Lucas got his inspiration from, and its also why characters in star have japanese sounding names and darth vader wears futuristic samurai armor.
 

Salinger

Woodpecker
I would also like to see the Friedkin 1977 remake "Sorcerer", not least for the Tangerine Dream soundtrack.
Sorcerer is more of a "cult classic" in that it's well-liked from those who have seen the film. I myself haven't seen it since the 80s.

I purchased the DVD years ago but haven't been able to watch it because I haven't gotten around to buying a Blu-ray player.

That bridge scene though at the end...I remember that being tense AF.

 

Syberpunk

Pelican
Gold Member
I've never seen The Right Stuff or The Searchers. There is a lot of westerns I haven't seen, Shane, for example.. I barely know Hitchcock but Rear Window was a masterpiece.

I've never seen 2001 either.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Good Bad and the Ugly is also one of my favorite movies, but its also on TV all of the time so I didn't think it would fit under "classic movies you've never seen"

Also, the review of Last Man Standing, supports what I said in my post. Watch Yojimbo first, then last man standing. If you watch Last Man Standing without being familiar with Yojimbo you lose a lot. I guess Ebert was too busy getting fat instead of understanding that the movie was a remake/homage to another dark, cheerless movie with a downbeat ending and an indifferent anti-hero.

Fistfull of dollars is the same way, Eastwood's "man with no name" character across the trilogy is also modelled on the Sanjuro/nameless ronin character from Kurosawa's films.

Its the same thing with Kurosawa's "the hidden fortress" and Star Wars. Though the hidden fortress isn't the best movie, you watch it and you can see where Lucas got his inspiration from, and its also why characters in star have japanese sounding names and darth vader wears futuristic samurai armor.
You're right, everyone has seen Good, Bad, and The Ugly. But out of Loene's movies it's the best one.

Just because a movie is modeled on a classic doesn't mean it's any good. And you shouldn't have to do homework, a movie should stand on it's own without one having to see the original, eg DePalma's Scarface and Blowout. I've never seen either original.

Oh yeah, Ebert was a fatty, great argument. Regardless, his review was accurate. Last Man Standing is a forgettable piece of junk.
 

Zagor

Sparrow
Taming of the shrew (1967), Elisabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. Based on a play by Shakespeare and full of red pill truths about male female relationship.

Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper,
Thy head, thy sovereign, one that cares for thee,
And for thy maintenance; commits his body
To painful labor, both by sea and land;
To watch the night in storms, the day in cold,
Whilst thou li’st warm at home, secure and safe;
And craves no other tribute at thy hands
But love, fair looks, and true obedience-
Too little payment for so great a debt.
 

Salinger

Woodpecker
...I tried to watch GWWW several years back and either I wasn't in the mood or modernity has ruined my attention span because I just couldn't get into it, but it's a film others truly appreciate. I feel like it will be "cancelled" now, just because it shows characters from the "evil" Confederacy without depicting them as demons.
I'd agree that Gone With The Wind is a little slow in parts and some performances are also a bit melodramatic. However, it's worth seeing simply because of Clark Gable. His character is a red-pilled, unabashed man in every sense of the word.
 

Garuda

Woodpecker
I haven't seen GWTW or Seven Samurai either. Others include the first Mad Max, Casablanca, Cleopatra and anything featuring Charlie Chaplin or the Marx Bros.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I hadn't seen Seven Samurai either until recently.

Which was weird for me, since I had watched so many other samurai movies in the past, including a few by Kurosawa in particular. I'm not a big movie guy though, so I'd always put it off because of the three hour runtime.

But when I finally got around to it, it honestly exceeded all of my expectations.

It's a tier above films like Yojimbo and Rashomon and really deserves its place among a small handful of films considered for the title of "best movie ever".

It's a very masculine movie too. All of the main characters (the seven samurai) are different but strong and likeable in their own way.
 

bmw633

Robin
I'd agree that Gone With The Wind is a little slow in parts and some performances are also a bit melodramatic. However, it's worth seeing simply because of Clark Gable. His character is a red-pilled, unabashed man in every sense of the word.
If you like Clark Gable, check out SAN FRANCISCO.

Another good movie with Barbara Stanwyck, withJohn Wayne costarring is BABY FACE. DOUBLE INDEMNITY also stars Stanwyck and Fred McMurray.
 
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