Cooking meals from emergency storage

Luna Novem

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I started doing a bit of minor prepping in 2020. I've had these cans of diced potatoes since then. I was worried they'd be gross, the sort of thing you'd only want to eat because you were starving. But I decided to use them in a recipe today in place of fresh potatoes, and they are actually super good! I'm relieved, lol.

Do you ladies do any prepping? Do you rotate your stock and cook using your emergency food? Any advice along these lines?
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
I'm not a lady, but I wanted to post anyway.

When I stocked up for Covid right at the start, I bought some canned beef, which I hadn't tried before. After 6-8 months, I thought I'd better do something with it, and I wasn't sure it would even be very good.

I made some beef rice-a-roni, added the can of beef, and a bunch of frozen mixed vegetables. It was fantastic! It's one of my favorite things to make now. I've always liked rice with chicken, or Spanish rice with hamburger, so this is along the same lines, but I think it might be the best combination yet.

I let my Covid stock run down once I realized the pandemic was a nothing burger, but now I want to build up a supply again with all the supply chain issues and other things going on. I figure a supply like this has to have lots of self stable foods, so canned meat plays a big part in that. Once I get stocked up, I will do my best to use older stock and keep it rotated. Worst case scenario, if I have a bunch of prepper food that I don't want to eat, and it's getting a little old, I'll donate it to a food bank while it still has some time to spare on the use-by date.
 

Luna Novem

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I'm not a lady, but I wanted to post anyway.

When I stocked up for Covid right at the start, I bought some canned beef, which I hadn't tried before. After 6-8 months, I thought I'd better do something with it, and I wasn't sure it would even be very good.

I made some beef rice-a-roni, added the can of beef, and a bunch of frozen mixed vegetables. It was fantastic! It's one of my favorite things to make now. I've always liked rice with chicken, or Spanish rice with hamburger, so this is along the same lines, but I think it might be the best combination yet.

I let my Covid stock run down once I realized the pandemic was a nothing burger, but now I want to build up a supply again with all the supply chain issues and other things going on. I figure a supply like this has to have lots of self stable foods, so canned meat plays a big part in that. Once I get stocked up, I will do my best to use older stock and keep it rotated. Worst case scenario, if I have a bunch of prepper food that I don't want to eat, and it's getting a little old, I'll donate it to a food bank while it still has some time to spare on the use-by date.
Nice! We have some canned beef, too. I will admit, canned meat scares me the most, lol. My husband likes canned chicken in quesadillas, though, so between that and your experience, it can't be too bad!
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
We prep. I think the most important part about prepping, especially with little kids, is to make sure you have food they will actually eat:
We stocked up on Nutella and pasta lol. Tang and Country time lemonade for vitamin c.

Canned potatoes are great in pot pie (you can make a pot pie from all canned ingredients, crust from bisquick!). Chili and pasta sauce can all be made from canned foods. (Won’t be as good as fresh but not bad, ie, edible).
 

Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
I don't know why, but my mom used to frequently make potato salad with canned potatoes. I ate a lot of canned goods growing up and genuinely don't hate them, save for spinach. Green beans and peas I can tolerate (and for some reason sometimes I get a hankering for canned peas).

We have a stash and I rotate things out pretty regularly. The library has a free pantry box out front and I give away things before they go bad. Somebody gifted us a bunch of coffee we ended up hating so we donated that to church haha.

I do a big fridge clean-out about every two weeks and use up basically everything-- some dried out strawberries ended up in banana muffins yesterday, made pepper steak because the peppers were going bad and have a lot of soy sauce packets, etc.

I don't worry too much about prepping honestly, besides having a good base (I focus on dry goods because electricity can be unreliable). People have made it through some terrible times and we don't have much control of that in the end.
 

Luna Novem

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I don't know why, but my mom used to frequently make potato salad with canned potatoes. I ate a lot of canned goods growing up and genuinely don't hate them, save for spinach. Green beans and peas I can tolerate (and for some reason sometimes I get a hankering for canned peas).

We have a stash and I rotate things out pretty regularly. The library has a free pantry box out front and I give away things before they go bad. Somebody gifted us a bunch of coffee we ended up hating so we donated that to church haha.

I do a big fridge clean-out about every two weeks and use up basically everything-- some dried out strawberries ended up in banana muffins yesterday, made pepper steak because the peppers were going bad and have a lot of soy sauce packets, etc.

I don't worry too much about prepping honestly, besides having a good base (I focus on dry goods because electricity can be unreliable). People have made it through some terrible times and we don't have much control of that in the end.
I'm fine with canned green beans and canned corn and canned beans (like kidney beans, black beans, etc.) But virtually no other single-ingredient canned vegetables or meats. I'm a weirdo. Even as a kid, I would eat Campbell's chicken noodle soup but NEVER the pieces of chicken. They'd stay at the bottom of the bowl and go straight to the garbage, lol.
 

Ah_Tibor

Pelican
Woman
Orthodox
I'm fine with canned green beans and canned corn and canned beans (like kidney beans, black beans, etc.) But virtually no other single-ingredient canned vegetables or meats. I'm a weirdo. Even as a kid, I would eat Campbell's chicken noodle soup but NEVER the pieces of chicken. They'd stay at the bottom of the bowl and go straight to the garbage, lol.
I always hated green bean casserole! Canned soup is pretty nasty.
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
I grew up on canned food and my mom cooked with cream of mushroom or cream of chicken soup as a gravy on about everything. It took some years for my poor husband to convince me to buy frozen foods instead. I still don't mind canned food, (especially green bean casserole). When we lost our power and freezers/fridge full of food in our last winter storm I was glad we had stocked up on canned foods.
 

Pray_Everyday

Robin
Woman
Other Christian
On my youtube suggestions I get a lot of prepper videos, and I've watched a few. One thing that's been mentioned by several of them is that canned food does NOT go bad, and is safe to eat long past the "best by" date as long as the cans are not dented, rusty or bulging. Canned food from over a century ago has been found to be safe to eat and still nutritious.

From link:
"Did you know that the excavation of canned goods over 100 years old, proved to be completely safe to eat?

In 1865, a steamboat loaded with canned provisions left port for the mining camps in Montana. Unfortunately, it had too many provisions and the weight of the vessel caused it to sink early on in its journey. It sat at the bottom of the Missouri River for nearly a century. Among the provisions were cans of plum tomatoes, mixed vegetables, peaches, oysters, and honey.

In 1974, several scientists at the NFPA checked the content of the cans. They found that the products still had significant nutritional value and zero microbial growth. In fact, the chemists found that these canned goods were just as safe to eat in 1974 as they were to eat 100 years earlier.

OK so now you know expiration dates are essentially meaningless when it comes to canned food. Does that mean canned food can never go bad? No…they definitely can. You must learn how to tell the difference between canned foods that are safe to consume and those that are not."


Anyway, we figure if it comes to a situation of food scarcity and risk of starving, we (the adults) will suck it up and eat the canned meats with plenty of salt - which we also stocked up on - to make it palatable. (I love canned tuna with just salt and a little olive oil, I've always hated mayo). For the kids I have beef jerky, dehydrated cheese crisps, peanut and almond butter, canned fruit, jar baby food, pasta, etc.
 

messaggera

Pelican
Woman
Other Christian
This created thread topic question is similar to this overall thread topic:


Or

 
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