Coronavirus Economic, Cultural, Political Ramifications

Easy_C

Crow
By the way is it just me or do leftists seem to have snapped in some degree?

It’s just a feeling. They’re always kind of batshit crazy but something feels different about the way they’re behaving.
 

Handsome Creepy Eel

Owl
Gold Member
A simple way to fix that nonsense: amend the law so that the total amount of benefits may not exceed the average amount earned during the last 3 months. However, I guess it will never be passed.
 

Samseau

Owl
Gold Member
SamuelBRoberts said:
All of this sounds like what you would want to happen, and not what you have any reason to think will happen.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...turning-americans-both-parties-against-china/

I see it in my day to day life, and it's reflected in even the fakest of polls:

The bipartisan consensus on China doesn’t stop there. Ninety percent of Republicans said the Chinese government is responsible for the spread of the virus, compared to 67 percent of Democrats. Only 22 percent of Republicans and 34 percent of Democrats said they thought the Chinese government reported their coronavirus statistics accurately.

On trade, there’s even more agreement. Neither party seems to know whether China will fulfill its obligations under Trump’s “phase one” trade deal. But strong majorities in both parties believe that the U.S. government should reimpose tough tariffs if Beijing doesn’t live up to its obligations. Majorities in both parties also believe U.S. manufacturers should pull back from China in the wake of the crisis.
The Globalist world order is ending, and many of the problems inherent to our degenerate culture have been cut off at the roots.

This virus was a political gift from God, so it's ironic that many God-fearing men are resisting the changes brought about with so much vigor. Yet more proof that God brings Good out of Evil!
 

Garuda

Woodpecker
It has sent women back to the kitchen and some are actually enjoying the change.

Now how do we make it so that only women are under stay-at-home orders and extend those orders for as long as we can?

https://nypost.com/2020/04/28/coronavirus-is-turning-badass-nyc-women-into-housewives/

Coronavirus is turning badass NYC women into housewives
By Suzy Weiss April 28, 2020 | 3:17pm

Newlywed Alison Mahoney never had time to cook — until COVID-19 hit New York.

“I’m always running all over the place … Usually, I come home around 8, my husband cooks dinner and I pass out on the couch,” Mahoney, an event planner who lives in Harlem, tells The Post.

But within the first three days of quarantine, the 41-year-old “had used up all the all-purpose flour,” churning out homemade English muffins, crumb cake and banana bread. And that’s just the tip of her pandemic transformation.

“I’ve refinished two pieces of furniture and crocheted three hats and a dog sweater,” says Mahoney, who’s spent hours watching YouTube tutorial videos about cake decorating and the “challenging” cable-knit stitch. “I have all this time now — I figure I may as well get crafty.”

Ambitious, urbane NYC women are usually more into hustling than homemaking. But in the midst of the health crisis, boardroom badasses are embracing their inner housewives — and even finding joy in domestic tasks, such as knitting, embroidering and baking.

“I’m usually very busy,” says Mimi Tu, a 29-year-old university administrator who lives in Ridgewood. But now that she’s working from home, she has enough time to watch grass grow — as well as scallions and herbs, which she’s cultivating on her windowsill.

“It makes me feel productive and like there’s some result I can look forward to,” says the newfound container gardener. Between waterings, she’s honing her kitchen skills, whipping up cinnamon rolls, homemade pasta and focaccia bread.

Three months ago, if you’d told Queens DJ Kiki Feliz that she’d soon master boeuf bourguignon in her tiny kitchen, “I would’ve laughed in your face,” says the 27-year-old. “Before the pandemic, I think I’ve grocery shopped about 10 times in 3 ½ years of living in New York … and now I’m in the kitchen all day, every day.”

Now that she’s had a taste of the domestic life, she finds herself wanting more.

“I’ve thought about making bread,” says Feliz, who has yet to tackle the ubiquitous quarantine sourdough. “I definitely have plans to start a garden, and I want to teach myself how to sew, too.”

She could take pointers from 23-year-old Senochi Kang, who lives in Bushwick.

“I’ve ordered probably 10 cross-stitching and embroidery kits since this all started,” says Kang, who usually holds a demanding marketing job that keeps her “scrambling 24/7.”

Digging through her apartment for lockdown distractions, she unearthed a cross-stitching kit that a co-worker had gifted her. “It sat around in a tote for months,” says Kang — and now, it’s become her new obsession.

Since she’s picked up the needle and thread, “my anxiety has gone down,” says Kang, who plans to level up her stitch game in the coming weeks. “I’m trying to get into real embroidery and bedazzling, too. I hope to personalize my own clothes like a denim jacket or jeans, or start making patches.”

For her, quarantine’s brought her more than just a new hobby: It’s made her re-evaluate the city’s rat race and what she wants her life to look like post-pandemic.

“I’m going to try and move a little slower after this,” says Kang.

And Feliz, who’s originally from Texas, is going full “Little House on the Prairie.”

“In a lot of ways, I regressed in New York,” says the DJ. “I got swept up in the conveniences.”

When this is all over, she says, “I want to live on a farm, adopt a bunch of kids and make art.”
 
Samseau said:
SamuelBRoberts said:
All of this sounds like what you would want to happen, and not what you have any reason to think will happen.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...turning-americans-both-parties-against-china/

I see it in my day to day life, and it's reflected in even the fakest of polls:

The bipartisan consensus on China doesn’t stop there. Ninety percent of Republicans said the Chinese government is responsible for the spread of the virus, compared to 67 percent of Democrats. Only 22 percent of Republicans and 34 percent of Democrats said they thought the Chinese government reported their coronavirus statistics accurately.

On trade, there’s even more agreement. Neither party seems to know whether China will fulfill its obligations under Trump’s “phase one” trade deal. But strong majorities in both parties believe that the U.S. government should reimpose tough tariffs if Beijing doesn’t live up to its obligations. Majorities in both parties also believe U.S. manufacturers should pull back from China in the wake of the crisis.
The Globalist world order is ending, and many of the problems inherent to our degenerate culture have been cut off at the roots.
This ends with MORE globalism, not less. It turns out that a policy of "China gets to keep running their factories while we shut ours down for 2 months" is very good for the Chinese manufacturing base and very bad for ours.

We're going to lose a bunch of our factories and a bunch of our economic power, while they're going to get stronger. When that happens we'll have no choice but to buy from them, since we need the things they make.
 

eradicator

Peacock
Gold Member
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020...ent&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=facebook

White House blocks Anthony Fauci from testifying

Maybe some hope yet

White House blocks Anthony Fauci from testifying before Congress
White House says it would be 'counterproductive' for those involved in coronavirus response to testify before Congress.

4 hours ago
Top United States health official Dr Anthony Fauci will not testify next week to a congressional committee examining the response to the coronavirus pandemic by the administration of US President Donald Trump, the White House said on Friday, calling it "counterproductive" to have individuals involved in the response testify.

The White House issued an emailed statement after a spokesman for the Congressional committee holding the hearing said the committee had been informed by Trump administration officials that Fauci had been blocked from testifying.


"While the Trump Administration continues its whole-of-government response to COVID-19, including safely opening up America again and expediting vaccine development, it is counterproductive to have the very individuals involved in those efforts appearing at Congressional hearings," White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement to Reuters news agency. "We are committed to working with Congress to offer testimony at the appropriate time."

Fauci's testimony was being sought for a May 6 hearing by a House Appropriations subcommittee that oversees health programmes, House Appropriations Committee spokesman Evan Hollander said.

Advertisement

The Washington Post first reported that Fauci would not testify.

Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has been one of the leading and most trusted medical experts helping to guide the US response to the highly contagious virus that has swept across the US.

Fauci, who is no stranger to testifying before Congress, has sometimes contradicted Trump's optimistic misstatements about the virus and how much it is under control after claiming more than 64,000 lives in the US.

Fauci has warned against relaxing social distancing rules that have helped slow the spread of the virus but caused a major hit to the economy. That has earned him criticism from some of Trump's most ardent supporters, and Trump himself has retweeted a supporter who called for Fauci's firing.

Following speculation about Trump's intentions about the retweet, the president said he was not considering firing the scientist.
 

CynicalContrarian

Peacock
Gold Member
Peak Oil said we'd run out of physical oil.
Turns out, we have so much oil to spare ~ten years down the track. We ran out of oil storage instead.

Now they're running out of car storage as well.

SUVs Are Being Parked In The Middle Of The Ocean As Auto Inventory Crisis Deepens

What happens when you have an auto glut that simply won't go away? What do you do with all of those unsold cars? It's a question we first explored way back in 2014 in an article called "Where the World's Unsold Cars Go to Die". In that piece, we highlighted images from around the world of various places unsold cars were being stored. 
Back then, we could have never predicted that a pandemic would be the black swan that would have caused the next historic buildup of auto inventory. But now, with ports at capacity, tankers carrying automobiles - at least those tanker that aren't carrying oil - are being told to stay out at sea.
Such was the case on April 24 when a cargo of 2,000 Nissan SUVs was approaching the port of Los Angeles. They were told to drop anchor about a mile from the port and remain there. The port was full and the glut is indicative of just how the industry has collapsed in the U.S. 

John Felitto, a senior vice president for the U.S. unit of Norwegian shipping company Wallenius Wilhelmsen told Bloomberg: “Dealers aren’t really accepting cars and fleet sales are down because rental-car and fleet operators aren’t taking delivery either. This is different from anything we’ve seen before. Everyone is full to the brim.”
Though the Nissan shipment was eventually received 5 days later, Kipling Louttit, executive director of the Marine Exchange of Southern California said: “It is very abnormal for a container ship, a car carrier or a cruise ship not to go right to the berth, discharge and be on their way.”
The Long Beach terminal south of LA is capable of storing several thousand vehicles. Cars usually spend a short amount of time there before being relocated to lots 5 to 8 miles away. Then, they're sent to dealers. 
But the collapse in sales last month caused a backlog buildup. Ships had to divert to other ports and others had to wait to discharge cargo. The Port of Hueneme needed to find space for an additional 6,000 surplus cars. Kristin Decas, the port’s director and chief executive officer said: “You can’t stack cars. We even looked at using the Ventura County Fairgrounds.”


https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/suvs-are-being-parked-middle-ocean-auto-inventory-crisis-deepens
 

CynicalContrarian

Peacock
Gold Member
Easy_C said:
By the way is it just me or do leftists seem to have snapped in some degree?

It’s just a feeling. They’re always kind of batshit crazy but something feels different about the way they’re behaving.
Do you have a good example?
One more distinct than the norm?

I'd put it down to the r 'rabbits' realizing to some small degree that their hedonistic party is over & they're now having to face real live consequences.

Whether it be health, economic or job market concerns.
 

Handsome Creepy Eel

Owl
Gold Member
SamuelBRoberts said:
Samseau said:
SamuelBRoberts said:
All of this sounds like what you would want to happen, and not what you have any reason to think will happen.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...turning-americans-both-parties-against-china/

I see it in my day to day life, and it's reflected in even the fakest of polls:

The bipartisan consensus on China doesn’t stop there. Ninety percent of Republicans said the Chinese government is responsible for the spread of the virus, compared to 67 percent of Democrats. Only 22 percent of Republicans and 34 percent of Democrats said they thought the Chinese government reported their coronavirus statistics accurately.

On trade, there’s even more agreement. Neither party seems to know whether China will fulfill its obligations under Trump’s “phase one” trade deal. But strong majorities in both parties believe that the U.S. government should reimpose tough tariffs if Beijing doesn’t live up to its obligations. Majorities in both parties also believe U.S. manufacturers should pull back from China in the wake of the crisis.
The Globalist world order is ending, and many of the problems inherent to our degenerate culture have been cut off at the roots.
This ends with MORE globalism, not less. It turns out that a policy of "China gets to keep running their factories while we shut ours down for 2 months" is very good for the Chinese manufacturing base and very bad for ours.

We're going to lose a bunch of our factories and a bunch of our economic power, while they're going to get stronger. When that happens we'll have no choice but to buy from them, since we need the things they make.
I haven't seen a single claim of "China still running its factories" since this had begun. In fact, all media outlets and pundits who lobby for American reopening are constantly rubbing in the abysmal levels of economic activity and traffic in China as proof that China is still unable to function normally, with the cherry on top being claims that Chinese mobile phone subscriptions and censorship prove that China actually had 20 million deaths.

Conservatives: "China is hiding 20 million dead from this virus!"
Also Conservatives: "It's just a flu!"

We're going to lose a bunch of our factories and a bunch of our economic power, while they're going to get stronger. When that happens we'll have no choice but to buy from them, since we need the things they make.
In other words, just like it was before the crisis? :huh:

The answer to this issue has always been and still is the same: tariffs. But of course, we know that the avalanche of kvetching is going to put a stop to that.
 

paninaro

Woodpecker
bacon said:
With the additional 600 dollars tacked on to unemployment checks, many workers are making more being unemployed. This obviously disincentives many to want to keep their jobs or look for work as long as this extra unemployment stimulus goes on.
This is what happens when you get a mix of:
1. Congress rushing legislation without thinking it through
and
2. Low-wage workers not being financially literate.

As another poster suggested in this thread, they should have put a cap on the $600 to prevent it from being higher than your previous wage. They rushed it out without thinking, but also didn't want to make it complex because it would require massive reprogramming of state unemployment systems. As it is, they struggled to find programmers who understood the archaic COBOL programming language to modify it for the $600 payments.

Then, the people receiving these payments probably don't realize they are retroactive to March 29, so they are probably getting more than $600 in each check because it includes catch-up from previous weeks. On top of that, these payments will not last any longer than 7/31 (according to the legislation), and will likely end sooner.

So would you rather make a bit more in the short-term by being unemployed, but then making less as soon as July comes around, and also stuck trying to find a job in the middle of a massive economic recession... or go back to work now, and keep your job, which will be a bit less $$ compared to unemployment in the short-term, but better financially in the longer-term?

It's no wonder the people in the article are stuck in their low-wage jobs...
 

CynicalContrarian

Peacock
Gold Member
Peak Oil said we'd run out of physical oil.
Turns out, we have so much oil to spare ~ten years down the track. We ran out of oil storage instead.

Now they're running out of car storage as well.

SUVs Are Being Parked In The Middle Of The Ocean As Auto Inventory Crisis Deepens

What happens when you have an auto glut that simply won't go away? What do you do with all of those unsold cars? It's a question we first explored way back in 2014 in an article called "Where the World's Unsold Cars Go to Die". In that piece, we highlighted images from around the world of various places unsold cars were being stored.
Back then, we could have never predicted that a pandemic would be the black swan that would have caused the next historic buildup of auto inventory. But now, with ports at capacity, tankers carrying automobiles - at least those tanker that aren't carrying oil - are being told to stay out at sea.
Such was the case on April 24 when a cargo of 2,000 Nissan SUVs was approaching the port of Los Angeles. They were told to drop anchor about a mile from the port and remain there. The port was full and the glut is indicative of just how the industry has collapsed in the U.S.

John Felitto, a senior vice president for the U.S. unit of Norwegian shipping company Wallenius Wilhelmsen told Bloomberg: “Dealers aren’t really accepting cars and fleet sales are down because rental-car and fleet operators aren’t taking delivery either. This is different from anything we’ve seen before. Everyone is full to the brim.”
Though the Nissan shipment was eventually received 5 days later, Kipling Louttit, executive director of the Marine Exchange of Southern California said: “It is very abnormal for a container ship, a car carrier or a cruise ship not to go right to the berth, discharge and be on their way.”
The Long Beach terminal south of LA is capable of storing several thousand vehicles. Cars usually spend a short amount of time there before being relocated to lots 5 to 8 miles away. Then, they're sent to dealers.
But the collapse in sales last month caused a backlog buildup. Ships had to divert to other ports and others had to wait to discharge cargo. The Port of Hueneme needed to find space for an additional 6,000 surplus cars. Kristin Decas, the port’s director and chief executive officer said: “You can’t stack cars. We even looked at using the Ventura County Fairgrounds.”


https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/suvs-are-being-parked-middle-ocean-auto-inventory-crisis-deepens


Effete Elon's altruism is more likely, simple angst at him not getting his way...

Is This Why Elon Musk Is Talking Down His Stock Price?

In our view, TSLA desperately needs money now; yet, at ~$700/shr, there’s limited demand from institutional investors for the type of raise ($4-$5bn) they need to do. So… Elon Musk needs to get the stock price down before he potentially trips debt (etc.) covenant levels on actual cash on hand, or has to issue a going concern alert.
...
In our view, TSLA desperately needs money now


https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/why-elon-musk-talking-down-his-stock-price
 

Blitz

Newbie
Handsome Creepy Eel said:
A simple way to fix that nonsense: amend the law so that the total amount of benefits may not exceed the average amount earned during the last 3 months. However, I guess it will never be passed.
At my company we hired an intern who over the last 12 months earned a total of $5,000. Yet she qualifies for $2,000 per month for 4 months from Trudeau's generosity. The same $2,000 my partner and I who signed her checks qualify for.

In Canada at least this is clearly becoming a test run for UBI, and good luck stratifying UBI payments, government deciding who is worth more. So get used to the silliness.
 
Is the car thing good for those of us who are in the market for a new car, or a lease? It seems to me in the coming year they'd do anything to move inventory. Deflation in that sector seems certain.
 

tomtud

Pelican
Blade Runner said:
Is the car thing good for those of us who are in the market for a new car, or a lease? It seems to me in the coming year they'd do anything to move inventory. Deflation in that sector seems certain.
If you have cash or steady income of course...... just be more patient. Wait until those with high payments start defaulting ( sad but true) and pounce. Even look at buying used. As for leasing, look for lease take overs. Low ball offers will be more appealing to sellers.

As for pinpointing the exact time to get in is hard. Hop in when you feel comfortable. A good used car imho is the path I would take as you can negotiate a sale or lease take over by low balling much more than the dealership. Dealerships have the money and access to credit from the factory or banks while individuals do not have that luxury.
 

Mountaineer

Kingfisher
Gold Member
The automotive industry will get absolutely rekt by this, hold off for two or more months and you will get a massive discount on what they have in stock.
 

RexImperator

Crow
Gold Member
It will be a bit of a wait until they’re totally desperate. I believe there’s also a glut of used cars out there, but they are being held back for fear of tanking the entire market.
 
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