Coronavirus Economic, Cultural, Political Ramifications

paninaro

Kingfisher
School—whether public or private—is usually a stressful environment for kids. Mostly because a large number of people are forced to spend most of the day together, whether they all get along or not. Kids can choose their friends, but not their classmates.
That sounds like most jobs in the workplace!
 

budoslavic

Peacock
Gold Member
Popular Antifa COVID-19 Portland fundraiser accused of being a scam

Questions about financial misconduct have arisen over a viral Antifa crowdfunding campaign that raised over $100,000 on the promise of supporting Portlanders in need during the coronavirus pandemic.

A week before Oregon Governor Kate Brown issued a state-wide stay-at-home order on March 23, a group of left-wing activists in Portland started a GoFundMe campaign. The “PDX COVID-19 Mutual Aid Network Fundraiser” was an immediate success. Accompanied by a logo of a raised fist in between roses (Portland is known as the “City of Roses”), the campaign instantly surpassed its initial goal of $5,000. The page, which said it will be “withdrawing funds and delivering them to community members on a rolling basis,” was shared and retweeted far beyond the Pacific Northwest. It promised to center those who are “targeted and marginalized under capitalism.” Local food co-ops joined in by asking patrons if they wanted to donate to the fund during check-out. Artists and other activists organized their own sub-campaigns where proceeds were donated to the GoFundMe. With the outpouring of international support, the organizers raised the donation goal several times. The goal eventually was raised to $100,000—a near 2,000 percent increase. Within a few weeks, this goal was met.

But just as quickly as the campaign went viral, cracks began to show. Several posted on social media that they didn’t receive aid.
“My 3 teens and I counted on that box,” wrote Rissa Vega in March. “I’m sick and quarantined. They need to eat.” No one responded to her comment on the group’s Facebook page. “I filled out a form about five days ago,” wrote Suzanne Stoughton. “My sister and I are over 64 and have health issues, are we going to receive assistance?”


Formally organized by self-described “anti-fascists” Sophie Robertson (who uses the pseudonym “Sophie Lord”), Maya Edelstein, Molly Case and Chloe Faison, the campaign promised to provide financial assistance, food and supplies to those who applied. Robertson did not respond to The Post Millennial’s questions or requests for comment. Edelstein, Case and Faison could not be reached for comment.
The backlash prompted the organizers to release another statement three days later. “We hear the asks for more transparency and clarity around this network and the GoFundMe. So, we are compiling all of our receipts (including screenshots of emails with GoFundMe, specific numbers, bank statements, etc.) to give more context of how we got here,” reads the statement. The group did not include any further information.

The project was a bait-and-switch, said a 32-year-old disabled transgender applicant to the mutual aid. The person asked not to be identified, telling The Post Millennial they feared retribution from the close-knit network of activists in Portland who have championed the project. The person said they applied for and received donation drop-offs filled with fresh groceries and VISA gift cards worth between $10–30 on three occasions in the early weeks of the project’s launch. This was while the GoFundMe was active; positive testimonies were reflected in photos and posts shared in the group’s Facebook, leading to more donations. However, the applicant says that in April—just two weeks after the project’s launch—the quality and frequency of the drop-offs took a nosedive.
The PDX COVID-19 Mutual Aid Network group launched its own website separate from its social media pages in late May. A link to request support, such as financial assistance, leads to a page that says the project is “no longer accepting responses.” However, a link to donate through PayPal is functional, despite the campaign saying donations were closed due to the goal having been met. The group recently released its first spreadsheet, which purports to show how much money has been spent and how many requests filled. According to the document, as of June 6, 249 aid packages utilizing the group’s funds have been delivered. That’s around 19 packages a week for a campaign that boasts of having 3,000 people who have volunteered to help.

The project’s last Instagram update on June 2 apologizes for the “silence” and says it will work on addressing issues of “whiteness” and “white supremacy” in the leadership.
 

Troller

Woodpecker

“Paradoxically, one can make long-term predictions on the basis of the prevalence of forecasting errors. A system that is over-reliant on prediction (through leverage, like the banking system before the recent crisis), hence fragile to unforeseen “black swan” events, will eventually break into pieces. Although fragile bridges can take a long time to collapse, 25 years in the 21st century should be sufficient to make hidden risks salient: connectivity and operational leverage are making cultural and economic events cascade faster and deeper. Anything fragile today will be broken by then.

The great top-down nation-state will be only cosmetically alive, weakened by deficits, politicians' misalignment of interests and the magnification of errors by centralised systems. The pre-modernist robust model of city-states and statelings will prevail, with obsessive fiscal prudence. Currencies might still exist, but, after the disastrous experience of America's Federal Reserve, they will peg to some currency without a government, such as gold.

Companies that are currently large, debt-laden, listed on an exchange (hence “efficient”) and paying bonuses will be gone. Those that will survive will be the more black swan-resistant—smaller, family-owned, unlisted on exchanges and free of debt. There will be large companies then, but these will be new—and short-lived.

Most of the technologies that are now 25 years old or more will be around; almost all of the younger ones “providing efficiencies” will be gone, either supplanted by competing ones or progressively replaced by the more robust archaic ones. So the car, the plane, the bicycle, the voice-only telephone, the espresso machine and, luckily, the wall-to-wall bookshelf will still be with us.

The world will face severe biological and electronic pandemics, another gift from globalisation.

Religious practice will experience a revival, seen as a conveyor of robust heuristics, cultural values and rituals. Science will produce smaller and smaller gains in the non-linear domain, in spite of the enormous resources it will consume; instead it will start focusing on what it cannot—and should not—do. Finally, what is now called academic economics will be treated with the same disrespect that rigorous (and practical) minds currently have for Derrida-style post-modernist verbiage.”
 

“Paradoxically, one can make long-term predictions on the basis of the prevalence of forecasting errors. A system that is over-reliant on prediction (through leverage, like the banking system before the recent crisis), hence fragile to unforeseen “black swan” events, will eventually break into pieces. Although fragile bridges can take a long time to collapse, 25 years in the 21st century should be sufficient to make hidden risks salient: connectivity and operational leverage are making cultural and economic events cascade faster and deeper. Anything fragile today will be broken by then.

The great top-down nation-state will be only cosmetically alive, weakened by deficits, politicians' misalignment of interests and the magnification of errors by centralised systems. The pre-modernist robust model of city-states and statelings will prevail, with obsessive fiscal prudence. Currencies might still exist, but, after the disastrous experience of America's Federal Reserve, they will peg to some currency without a government, such as gold.

Companies that are currently large, debt-laden, listed on an exchange (hence “efficient”) and paying bonuses will be gone. Those that will survive will be the more black swan-resistant—smaller, family-owned, unlisted on exchanges and free of debt. There will be large companies then, but these will be new—and short-lived.

Most of the technologies that are now 25 years old or more will be around; almost all of the younger ones “providing efficiencies” will be gone, either supplanted by competing ones or progressively replaced by the more robust archaic ones. So the car, the plane, the bicycle, the voice-only telephone, the espresso machine and, luckily, the wall-to-wall bookshelf will still be with us.

The world will face severe biological and electronic pandemics, another gift from globalisation.

Religious practice will experience a revival, seen as a conveyor of robust heuristics, cultural values and rituals. Science will produce smaller and smaller gains in the non-linear domain, in spite of the enormous resources it will consume; instead it will start focusing on what it cannot—and should not—do. Finally, what is now called academic economics will be treated with the same disrespect that rigorous (and practical) minds currently have for Derrida-style post-modernist verbiage.”
Great comment. Was this the whole article?
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
I use a lot of government services across multiple states for my work, and one thing I've noticed is that despite shutting most operations and services down....no one has been laid off, I have not seen any discussions of cuts in positions or laying people off or closing offices and money coming back to the taxpayer.

There are government payrolls full of people doing nothing, but no one has the balls to lay these people off and put a surplus back into the government/offset insane stimulus programs.
 

Troller

Woodpecker
Leaked draft of countries allowed and not allowed into EU:

"Euronews has obtained, from EU diplomatic sources, the full draft list of the countries for which Europe's borders will be open, and can confirm what we reported on Wednesday that Brazil, Qatar, the US and Russia are indeed not on the approved list."


Chinese allowed in. HONK, HONK. Lying on numbers WORKS (also bribes). Socialism is truly a cancer.
 

infowarrior1

Ostrich

“Paradoxically, one can make long-term predictions on the basis of the prevalence of forecasting errors. A system that is over-reliant on prediction (through leverage, like the banking system before the recent crisis), hence fragile to unforeseen “black swan” events, will eventually break into pieces. Although fragile bridges can take a long time to collapse, 25 years in the 21st century should be sufficient to make hidden risks salient: connectivity and operational leverage are making cultural and economic events cascade faster and deeper. Anything fragile today will be broken by then.

The great top-down nation-state will be only cosmetically alive, weakened by deficits, politicians' misalignment of interests and the magnification of errors by centralised systems. The pre-modernist robust model of city-states and statelings will prevail, with obsessive fiscal prudence. Currencies might still exist, but, after the disastrous experience of America's Federal Reserve, they will peg to some currency without a government, such as gold.

Companies that are currently large, debt-laden, listed on an exchange (hence “efficient”) and paying bonuses will be gone. Those that will survive will be the more black swan-resistant—smaller, family-owned, unlisted on exchanges and free of debt. There will be large companies then, but these will be new—and short-lived.

Most of the technologies that are now 25 years old or more will be around; almost all of the younger ones “providing efficiencies” will be gone, either supplanted by competing ones or progressively replaced by the more robust archaic ones. So the car, the plane, the bicycle, the voice-only telephone, the espresso machine and, luckily, the wall-to-wall bookshelf will still be with us.

The world will face severe biological and electronic pandemics, another gift from globalisation.

Religious practice will experience a revival, seen as a conveyor of robust heuristics, cultural values and rituals. Science will produce smaller and smaller gains in the non-linear domain, in spite of the enormous resources it will consume; instead it will start focusing on what it cannot—and should not—do. Finally, what is now called academic economics will be treated with the same disrespect that rigorous (and practical) minds currently have for Derrida-style post-modernist verbiage.”
Not likely. It may actually give rise to more Centralization. In the Long Term it will not result in City States but a much more powerful State:
 
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