Coronavirus Economic, Cultural, Political Ramifications

LeoniusD

Woodpecker

Hope it was all worth it to crush the economy in a way never seen before - 33% down!

And the weekly jobless claims are still coming in high with 1.2 to 1.6 mio. every week. Some jobs are returning, but many more are just falling out of the economic cycle.
 

LeoniusD

Woodpecker

UNICEF: An additional 6.7 million children under 5 could suffer from wasting this year due to COVID-19

Even if the number is overblown, when millions of children die under normal circumstances due to malnourishment, then having the lockdowns in place would kill certainly 1 mio. + more. Add to it the suicides in the developed world and you have a kill-count of the lockdowns that surpasses the inflated death rate of counting cancer- and car-accidents by a factor of 10. Currently they claim that 600000 died of covid luckily with the flu killing 600.000 less this year, but still.

But that is fine.
 
They wont starve the people out.its too risky and they know the numbers are against them.What they will try to do is push people so hard that they beg for tyranny. World population is already declining they are just putting things in place to ensure we reach a point of no return as far as the number of resistors. The peppers and patriots won't be fighting soyboys and leftist they will be fighting military the same military that has been gutted of patriots over the years. The same military that kill when ordered. The same military that trump has said will enforce the vaccines. But everyone will focus in the left instead of the real and only power in this country that has done this gutting (them, and satanists). But everyone will keep focusing on Tyrone with the bull horn because that's trending.
 

budoslavic

Peacock
Gold Member

LeoniusD

Woodpecker

800 shops are at least 12000 employees who lose their jobs - that's a huge part of their total worldwide store. They have about 8400 stores in the US and they are closing down 10% of that. Part of that will be comprised of underperforming individually owned franchises - they will be offloading part of the loss onto the enterpreneur and are doing it likely expecting further lockdowns. If you think that they will be just replaced by other stores, then you are mistaken.

The globalists have nothing against donuts - cheap unhealthy plant foods steeped in toxic seed oils with sugar and caffeine is perfect to stuff the serfs with, but they won't be sticking around at a loss either especially since their system makes it easy to reopen stores with the cash of individual franchisees. They will also partly be closing stores with the money of franchisees as the corporations always manage to offload that cost on the investor. Such measures sometimes also mean that a population is becoming poorer which is no surprise with tens of millions becoming unemployed. And we can add that 12000 unemployed to the list - likely a thousand more as the supply chain is also decreased in personnel.

They are really on a roll now - 2050 to 2060 with 50% eternally unemployed does not sound as an impossible goal now does it? It's really luck for them that corona came around and killed supposedly as many people as die in India over 20 days.
 

paninaro

Kingfisher
800 shops are at least 12000 employees who lose their jobs - that's a huge part of their total worldwide store. They have about 8400 stores in the US and they are closing down 10% of that. Part of that will be comprised of underperforming individually owned franchises - they will be offloading part of the loss onto the enterpreneur and are doing it likely expecting further lockdowns. If you think that they will be just replaced by other stores, then you are mistaken.
More than half of those closings were announced pre-shutdown, in early February. Dunkin terminated their agreement to have shops in Speedway (gas station) locations because they were older shops that can't offer the full Dunkin menu like sandwiches and a larger variety of beverages.
 

LeoniusD

Woodpecker
Georgia children's camp gets infected with Covid-19. Mainstream media is going nuts over this.

Infected does not mean jack shit. I know personally a guy from a large company where 1000 cases 'flared up'. 99% of them sat at home without any symptoms - asymptomatic disease is an insane orwellian term that does not exist in medicine or it did not exist. Asymptomatic cancer and pneumonia, what is that? And the remaining 1% of the workers had diarrhea or some unrelated issue that they called covid symptoms. How many of those kids are actually sick as in really sick?

It all started when one teen got a cold and they instantly tested him for those stupid non-sensical tests.

Among 136 cases with available symptom data, 36 (26%) patients reported no symptoms; among 100 (74%) who reported symptoms, those most commonly reported were subjective or documented fever (65%), headache (61%), and sore throat (46%).
Headache and subjective fever and subjective sore throat - a bunch of impressionable teens being told that they got the most dangerous supercovid. Who knows - maybe they ate something bad, the rest is psyche. None will die, none will be really sick - it's as if any tiny cold or sickness is now instantly covid - exactly as dissenting MDs had predicted.


Clown world -
 

budoslavic

Peacock
Gold Member
The following businesses have filed for bankruptcy:
  • Lord & Taylor
  • Men's Warehouse
  • Jos. A. Banks

 

Troller

Woodpecker
The guy who told me in 2014 luxury real estate would bust in 2019 and tourism in 2020. Had also said in 2022 tourism would be back in full force.
 

LeoniusD

Woodpecker
I was watching recently a few videos on Make Money Online Scams and contrepreneurs like Ty Lopez, Dan Lot etc.

But one thing that all of those cons have in common is a Compliance Ladder - her it's in relation to online dating scams, but the point remains the same:


In theory you could use compliance ladder for something relatively innocuous like seducing a girl (relatively only because that will damage the girl even if she is not aware of it and might have had sex with another man anyway).

Still - the Compliance Ladder is not only used in seduction, all the scams including the overpriced 997$ to 25.000$-make-mone-online seminars are using you to say yes at first to something minor, then up the compliance continuously while keeping the emotions up. In a seminar that is just the attendance of a free seminar that is then used to up your emotions, tell you to be super-positive, raise your hands during seminar (compliance test), then clap and scream like the others - so that by the end of the free 2 hours seminar you are willing to spend 2000$ for the upsell event where the real money is being made.

For Covid - the emotion used is fear, they keep up the fear-mongering even in many countries without any uptick in mortality, they publish you cumulative stats, they even avoid the topic of real mortality or make the uptick in a few places appear more catastrophic than it seems. Why don't they publish the CDC stats? Because that is akin to a con artist like Ty Lopez stepping away from the Lambo and telling you to think it over, research how much money is really made online or why he is selling courses if he could just make hundreds of millons over some of the current online cons they push. So they will never ever tell you the truth, but use every excuse and even fraudulent stats to keep up the con:

EeIWMcbWAAMjcwm (1).jpg

And what are the Compliance Ladder steps:

* stay at home - save lives - flatten the curve - this will be over in 4 weeks
* wear a mask everywhere
+ accept becoming jobless and poor in order to save more lives - or you would all die
+ forget the flattening of the curve - we are now about eternal covid, here to stay - wear the masks and report anyone not wearing them, breaking quarantine or inviting 3 people for a meeting

Next steps:
+ accept more austerity and poverty because of covid - otherwise you are all going to die
+ do not travel - because of covid
+ stop eating meat - it spreads pandemics
+ wear your frigging masks everywhere
+ take your frigging vaccines! (we are here)

Then later:
+ yes - you live in a dystopian police-state, but only that police state is keeping you alive - otherwise most of you would be dead by now
+ since you take the vaccines, it's better to take tracking chips, because some people avoid the vaccines and spread covid and you would like to know whether someone untracked unvaccinated and unchipped is coming close to you, because that person might give you covid

Thus - masks are just part of the Compliance Ladder not unlike your clapping or participation at a MMO-seminar or a girl following a guy home because he 'just forgot something at his Airbnb place'. In all those cases the target is getting fucked - with varying repercussions to the person.
 

ralfy

Pigeon
Peak Oil said we'd run out of physical oil.
Turns out, we have so much oil to spare ~ten years down the track. We ran out of oil storage instead.

Now they're running out of car storage as well.

SUVs Are Being Parked In The Middle Of The Ocean As Auto Inventory Crisis Deepens

What happens when you have an auto glut that simply won't go away? What do you do with all of those unsold cars? It's a question we first explored way back in 2014 in an article called "Where the World's Unsold Cars Go to Die". In that piece, we highlighted images from around the world of various places unsold cars were being stored.
Back then, we could have never predicted that a pandemic would be the black swan that would have caused the next historic buildup of auto inventory. But now, with ports at capacity, tankers carrying automobiles - at least those tanker that aren't carrying oil - are being told to stay out at sea.
Such was the case on April 24 when a cargo of 2,000 Nissan SUVs was approaching the port of Los Angeles. They were told to drop anchor about a mile from the port and remain there. The port was full and the glut is indicative of just how the industry has collapsed in the U.S.

John Felitto, a senior vice president for the U.S. unit of Norwegian shipping company Wallenius Wilhelmsen told Bloomberg: “Dealers aren’t really accepting cars and fleet sales are down because rental-car and fleet operators aren’t taking delivery either. This is different from anything we’ve seen before. Everyone is full to the brim.”
Though the Nissan shipment was eventually received 5 days later, Kipling Louttit, executive director of the Marine Exchange of Southern California said: “It is very abnormal for a container ship, a car carrier or a cruise ship not to go right to the berth, discharge and be on their way.”
The Long Beach terminal south of LA is capable of storing several thousand vehicles. Cars usually spend a short amount of time there before being relocated to lots 5 to 8 miles away. Then, they're sent to dealers.
But the collapse in sales last month caused a backlog buildup. Ships had to divert to other ports and others had to wait to discharge cargo. The Port of Hueneme needed to find space for an additional 6,000 surplus cars. Kristin Decas, the port’s director and chief executive officer said: “You can’t stack cars. We even looked at using the Ventura County Fairgrounds.”


https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/suvs-are-being-parked-middle-ocean-auto-inventory-crisis-deepens
Peak oil isn't about running out of oil but oil production reaching a peak. That happens for obvious reasons (oil is a limited resource and gravity), and has been taking place. Oil started peaking in some countries during the 1930s, conventional production for the U.S. started peaking in 1970, world production per capita in 1979, two-thirds of oil-producing countries since the 1990s, world conventional production since 2005, and so on.

The reason why there's an oil glut is economic crashes. In 2006, the IEA predicted that oil consumption would reach 115 million barrels a day by 2015 because of robust economic growth, and that producers would easily meet it because there's no peak oil: rather, problems are above-ground, i.e., political. In 2008, the world economy crashed because of increasing debt, and it experienced low economic growth for the next decade. Meanwhile, in 2010, the IEA decided to do a global survey of all oil production, and released a report in 2012 with findings from that survey: it acknowledged that it made the wrong prediction in 2006. Apparently, peak oil is an underground problem, and conventional production started peaking in 2005, the year before they made the wrong prediction. U.S. producers didn't need to be told that because they had been getting investors to develop shale and other means of unconventional production. Even with 400 years' worth of oil underground worldwide, they still decided to resort to shale while others north looked at tar sands. They promised investors (with over 70 pct of investments in junk bonds) that high-risk shale production would be profitable because oil prices would go up to $100 and stay there.

The catch is that the world economy couldn't stand high prices, so they eventually went down together with world economic growth. That's why even before the pandemic world oil consumption barely reached 100 Mbd, far lower than what the IEA predicted more than a decade ago.

Now, the oil industry is not only stuck with lots of oil but over $2.5 trillion in debt that was used to increase oil production across more than a decade. Why so high an amount? Because of diminishing returns: the industry was spending larger amounts of money each time for decreasing amounts of new oil produced each time. What caused these diminishing returns? The fact that oil is a finite resource and gravity, which makes oil production more expensive each time. What helps to make it less expensive? Increasing amounts of money created, which is what led to the 2008 crash. So the world faces a combination of high debts needed to get more oil but with financial risk-taking leads to chronic economic crashes, and more expensive oil which requires more debt and can be paid for through high prices which in turn also leads to economic crashes.

Given that, how will the pandemic affect oil production? More than five years ago, it was reported that the oil industry needed oil price to go up to at least $75 a barrel because that was the only way they could cover $500 billion in debt payments and part of that $2.5 trillion debt. But they need the price to go even higher than that if they were expected to pay off the rest of the debt, if not to maintain operations in the long term.

In conclusion, it turns out that the world didn't have to wait for oil production to reach a peak, i.e., peak oil. Rather, all that was needed were the effects of peak oil, i.e., more expensive production, to take place, which would lead to more debt which, in turn would cause the economy to crash and remain weak. In short, the world avoided an economic crash that would have been caused by an oil crunch by having an economic crash caused by soaring debt.

And the pandemic has provided the icing on the cake, especially for the oil industry which had just borrowed $170 billion more last March.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Peak oil isn't about running out of oil but oil production reaching a peak. That happens for obvious reasons (oil is a limited resource and gravity), and has been taking place. Oil started peaking in some countries during the 1930s, conventional production for the U.S. started peaking in 1970, world production per capita in 1979, two-thirds of oil-producing countries since the 1990s, world conventional production since 2005, and so on.

The reason why there's an oil glut is economic crashes. In 2006, the IEA predicted that oil consumption would reach 115 million barrels a day by 2015 because of robust economic growth, and that producers would easily meet it because there's no peak oil: rather, problems are above-ground, i.e., political. In 2008, the world economy crashed because of increasing debt, and it experienced low economic growth for the next decade. Meanwhile, in 2010, the IEA decided to do a global survey of all oil production, and released a report in 2012 with findings from that survey: it acknowledged that it made the wrong prediction in 2006. Apparently, peak oil is an underground problem, and conventional production started peaking in 2005, the year before they made the wrong prediction. U.S. producers didn't need to be told that because they had been getting investors to develop shale and other means of unconventional production. Even with 400 years' worth of oil underground worldwide, they still decided to resort to shale while others north looked at tar sands. They promised investors (with over 70 pct of investments in junk bonds) that high-risk shale production would be profitable because oil prices would go up to $100 and stay there.

The catch is that the world economy couldn't stand high prices, so they eventually went down together with world economic growth. That's why even before the pandemic world oil consumption barely reached 100 Mbd, far lower than what the IEA predicted more than a decade ago.

Now, the oil industry is not only stuck with lots of oil but over $2.5 trillion in debt that was used to increase oil production across more than a decade. Why so high an amount? Because of diminishing returns: the industry was spending larger amounts of money each time for decreasing amounts of new oil produced each time. What caused these diminishing returns? The fact that oil is a finite resource and gravity, which makes oil production more expensive each time. What helps to make it less expensive? Increasing amounts of money created, which is what led to the 2008 crash. So the world faces a combination of high debts needed to get more oil but with financial risk-taking leads to chronic economic crashes, and more expensive oil which requires more debt and can be paid for through high prices which in turn also leads to economic crashes.

Given that, how will the pandemic affect oil production? More than five years ago, it was reported that the oil industry needed oil price to go up to at least $75 a barrel because that was the only way they could cover $500 billion in debt payments and part of that $2.5 trillion debt. But they need the price to go even higher than that if they were expected to pay off the rest of the debt, if not to maintain operations in the long term.

In conclusion, it turns out that the world didn't have to wait for oil production to reach a peak, i.e., peak oil. Rather, all that was needed were the effects of peak oil, i.e., more expensive production, to take place, which would lead to more debt which, in turn would cause the economy to crash and remain weak. In short, the world avoided an economic crash that would have been caused by an oil crunch by having an economic crash caused by soaring debt.

And the pandemic has provided the icing on the cake, especially for the oil industry which had just borrowed $170 billion more last March.
Fantastic break down.

Please post more.
 

An0dyne

Robin
Business has been so terrible for us that we had to shut down again. We spun it as "rising cases" and "public safety" (which killed me a little bit), but the real reason was simply that it costs us more to have the lights on than we're bringing in in revenue.

Honestly I see no way forward so long as the masses are in "the sky is falling" mode, which seems to be going in perpetuity. We're slightly hopeful that after the election, one way or another (more the one way than the other), people might feel "safe" going out again, or perhaps we can try to creatively adapt for the "times." But who knows what the times will be like in a month?
 
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