Could this be a thread strictly for theological books?

I know there is a thread for posting books you read and I definitely don't mean to derail that thread.

It is just that since there are so many categories of books, maybe we can try to segregate the theological from the secular books?

This thread can be a place to not only list theological books you already read, but ones that you plan to read.
 
An excellent idea. Two obvious but often recommended books, both by C.S. Lewis...

Mere Christianity
A Grief Observed

The second seems to be a well-respected book by older gentlemen I've known and I've been meaning to ask @Roosh if he's read it and if so, his thoughts.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I just finished reading Mere Christianity and I was honestly quite shocked by how closely Lewis's view of the atonement and salvation resembles that of Orthodoxy. The way that he talks about the purpose of the Christian life bears a shocking resemblance to theosis, the only major difference (that an amateur like myself could discern, anyway) was that he doesn't much emphasize the church's role in the process.

It's so striking that I'm surprised I've never seen some upset Reformed blogger write pages upon pages about why Lewis is gravely mistaken on this topic, or whatever.
 

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
There's this Christian publisher named Crossway that's released a series of books on the thinking and doctrines of various theologians. It's heavily Protestant slanted with Augustine being the only non-Protestant theologian being represented. I've read and am reading through a few of the books in the series and I can attest to the quality of their content.

These aren't the type of books that can be breezed through in the same way your standard NYT bestseller by some pop public intellectual can be but at the same time, they aren't as dense as a purely academic book would be. They certainly are easier to understand then diving headfirst directly into the primary source works of each theologian is discussed.

While the ideas discussed can be abstract (sanctification vs. justification) the authors always makes sure that ideas never remain just theories and pure ideas with no application for Christians who aren't inclined towards metaphysical and philosophical pondering. Rather, everything is always written so that a general reader understands why some theological point is relevant to the their understanding of Christ and how it affects their beliefs and practice in a practical sense.

A few of the titles:



 

Roosh

Cardinal
An excellent idea. Two obvious but often recommended books, both by C.S. Lewis...

Mere Christianity
A Grief Observed

The second seems to be a well-respected book by older gentlemen I've known and I've been meaning to ask @Roosh if he's read it and if so, his thoughts.
I did but didn't get much out of it. C.S. Lewis writes in a different kind of style that doesn't hit me strongly.
 

Aboulia

Robin
Language of Creation - Matthieu Pageau

While not technically a "theological" book, it's about the symbolism used in biblical stories, and the stories and language used in the bible become much clearer after reading.
 
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