Demons And The City

Roosh

Cardinal
Originally posted on RooshV.com

street-shadow-1024x683.jpg

The typical Western city of today is the most effective environment to encourage sin. It is able to generate immoral behaviors so effectively that the task of corrupting your soul becomes one of demonic auto-pilot.

If the opportunity to commit evil is all around you, and you have already chosen for that evil, why do demons need to get involved? Demons must labor to influence you to choose wrong, but if you voluntarily place yourself in an evil environment with the purpose of satisfying a wish list of sinful desires, you make their job effortless. A good example is someone who moves from a small, traditional town to a city like New York or Los Angeles. A man or woman uprooted themselves and went to the big city because they desire to gorge themselves on money, sex, and fame. When a hungry child is in a candy store, do you need to convince him to eat candy? He simply dives in until he gets sick, and during that time of eating, he needs no convincing from a being or external force to keep going until his belly is full of sugar and high fructose corn syrup.

I suspect that there are not many demons residing in the major cities. The evil you may feel while in one may not come from the presence of demons but the mass quantity of people who have chosen evil. The city is actually a platform for evil, one that Satan has constructed and optimized over hundreds of years to lower the barrier for you to commit severe sins. To engage in pride or fornication within a modern city involves no debate or consternation—they’re so normalized that you are looked at as an oddball if you decide against them. You don’t have Instagram? You’re anti-social. You don’t want to hook up after a night of drinking? You’re sexually inadequate. Your friends and acquaintances play the role of the demons by tempting you to sin, and they do that work for free. Surely the demons swing by on weekend nights to appreciate their handy work, especially in the month of June when the sodomites take over much of the Western urban world, but do they need to persuade a homosexual to attend a gay pride parade? Do they need to urge him to wave dildos and other sexual paraphernalia in public?



If the demons are not in the city then where are they? On assignment corrupting souls that have chosen for Christ. Demons venture out of the city, away from the nightlife and gay pride parades, and into the suburbs to cause strife in families. They separate man and wife and put rebellious ideas in the minds of children. They’re in the countryside, introducing subtle traps to those who want to worship God through the natural world. And they’re in the monasteries, attacking men who are on their way to receiving a hundredfold blessing from God.

The demons only care about you when you care about your salvation. The ancient Desert Fathers remarked on the pattern: the instant you choose to pick up your cross and walk with Christ, the demons climb on your back and won’t leave until God has deemed their attacks sufficient for the building of your virtue. When I went into the mountains for two months to live in what I later found out was a former crack house, a den of exceeding vice, I was tormented by sexual dreams and nightmares involving actual demons burning my flesh. Relief only came when I slept beside a wooden cross. While the nightmares were frightening at the time, I must take it as a compliment that the demons cared enough to single me out.

In my old life in the city, when I chased women for casual sex, Satan left me alone as I destroyed myself, and I can’t recall having even a single nightmare from the time I was behaving at my worst. From this point on, if Satan wants my soul, he’s going to have to devote all his resources to the task, whether I live in a city or not, because I certainly won’t give it to him without a fight.

Read Next: I Lived Most Of My Life Under Demonic Influence

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mgill0600

Pigeon
My pastor made a comment one time in a bible study about how God is able to take everything that Satan corrupts, and redeem it to be used for his own holy purposes. The specific example he gave is regarding cities and how the first city was built by Cain after he had murdered his brother Abel. Prior to that, man lived in the Garden of Eden and then the wilderness outside the garden. The city has been synonymous with the sin and excesses you have described in your article, and a symbol of rebellion against God.

However, in Revelation it is revealed that the New Jerusalem will be a holy city, one that is as beautiful as it is righteous, lighted not by the sun but by the glory of God.

There are many such examples in the Bible of Satan using man's ingenuity to corrupt him, and God claiming those devices back for Himself. I think another such example is the symbol of the cross, which today represents the ultimate sacrifice of our savior Jesus to redeem all mankind, whereas in His day it would have been a symbol of the depthless cruelty of man and our ever more creative methods of inflicting pain on our fellow brothers and sisters.
 
I remember when I was younger, I actually had the ambition of moving to a big city like New York, or somewhere in Florida, Georgia or California in order to make contacts and get a leg up in the illustration and/or animation fields. Looking at the output from animation studios and the art world in general, I can't imagine working for an art company and being able to look at my face in the mirror each day. If there is one area of culture that the theological and political Left control with an absolute iron fist, it's definitely the art world. Trying to make contacts with people who aren't basically card carrying members of BLM, ANTIFA or the Communist Party/Cultural Marxism is a laughable joke.

I'd recommend anyone wanting to become an artist, to self train via online tutorials or schools, similar to what is recommended on this list/article:


The author of this article also started his own online art school:


Also if you happen to be blessed to be near an old school style atelier, and can afford it, then go. They are very traditional and conservative, and will train you in the manner of classic masters like Leonardo and Michelangelo:


Whatever you do, avoid standard university/secular art schools like the plague. Both for being overpriced, usually having a "too many cooks in the kitchen" type of inefficient training, and the constant Marxist indoctrination you will have to endure/bite your tongue at (I speak from personal experience.) The Marxism in universities is already bad enough; in a university art school, that already noxious level of Marxism is turned up to 11. It's like being in the very center of the Hive, just mere feet away from the queen.

It is a blessing that the internet can aid us in pursuing training and a possible living outside of having to uproot ourselves from communities and go into devilish cities. I do not know how the current online purge of conservatives may affect this in the future though.
 
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Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I think it's nice to live within reasonable driving distance of the city (assuming normal, non-Covidian times.) It's fun to go on a date at a nice restaurant, visit a store for a specialty hobby like vinyl records, take your kids to the aquarium, or go to a big park (if it's decent and not filled with junkies or whatever.)

But these are day-trip sorts of things, at most, and there are no longer really any good reasons to actually live in the city if you're red pill and have escape from the urbanite bugman mind-prison. Roosh's article is right on, the very structure of city life is designed to facilitate unhealthy relationships and spending habits.

One thing that I do miss from (an idealized version of) the city is walkability. I'm in a suburban, borderline country area now, and I think it'd be great to be able to walk to the grocery store, post office, restaurants, and my friends' houses. This closer style of living is one of the only things I miss from the city, but interestingly I had this, at least to some extent, when I lived in a Japanese countryside town a decade ago, so it's not necessarily a city-vs-country thing, even though that's how it plays out in the US.

Having to drive a minimum of ten minutes to get absolutely anywhere kinda sucks.
 
I think it's nice to live within reasonable driving distance of the city (assuming normal, non-Covidian times.) It's fun to go on a date at a nice restaurant, visit a store for a specialty hobby like vinyl records, take your kids to the aquarium, or go to a big park (if it's decent and not filled with junkies or whatever.)

But these are day-trip sorts of things, at most, and there are no longer really any good reasons to actually live in the city if you're red pill and have escape from the urbanite bugman mind-prison. Roosh's article is right on, the very structure of city life is designed to facilitate unhealthy relationships and spending habits.

One thing that I do miss from (an idealized version of) the city is walkability. I'm in a suburban, borderline country area now, and I think it'd be great to be able to walk to the grocery store, post office, restaurants, and my friends' houses. This closer style of living is one of the only things I miss from the city, but interestingly I had this, at least to some extent, when I lived in a Japanese countryside town a decade ago, so it's not necessarily a city-vs-country thing, even though that's how it plays out in the US.

Having to drive a minimum of ten minutes to get absolutely anywhere kinda sucks.
It's screwed up that US areas are designed to maximise car use. As if wanting to maximise oil consumption.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I wonder if part of it comes from mid-century optimism about continued advancement in transportation. When the highway system and suburbs were built in the 50s, this was also the peak of science-fiction optimism about the future, and people likely assumed that advances like flying cars and other super-fast transportation systems would make distance a minor consideration.

Unfortunately, none of these things ever happened and our transportation capacities are no better now than they were sixty or seventy years ago. But many of us are stuck living in communities planned with the expectation of continuous improvement that never came. There's a metaphor in there somewhere.

It's funny how "space age" people thought we'd have jetpacks but never really anticipated anything like smartphones. All the innovation happened with (mostly destructive) communications technology, not transportation.
 

ilostabet

Pelican
I wonder if part of it comes from mid-century optimism about continued advancement in transportation. When the highway system and suburbs were built in the 50s, this was also the peak of science-fiction optimism about the future, and people likely assumed that advances like flying cars and other super-fast transportation systems would make distance a minor consideration.

Unfortunately, none of these things ever happened and our transportation capacities are no better now than they were sixty or seventy years ago. But many of us are stuck living in communities planned with the expectation of continuous improvement that never came. There's a metaphor in there somewhere.

It's funny how "space age" people thought we'd have jetpacks but never really anticipated anything like smartphones. All the innovation happened with (mostly destructive) communications technology, not transportation.

Regarding cars and roads:

The longer the distances your technology allows you to cover, the more the society will be restructured around it - so in the short term things will be closer, and in the long term they will be further away (this goes for cars as well as communication technology). Tech (especially industrial) always starts as an option, and then it becomes indispensable - which means an added layer of consumption and cost to your life that you did not have before to accomplish basic things. It is totalitarian in its implications.

And these are consequences of the advantages, not the disadvantages (like pollution, extremely high death rates and so on). Even if we were able to do away with these disadvantages, the actual advantages of the car and roads imply a different type of cost (which is not easily nor immediately seen).
 
I wonder if part of it comes from mid-century optimism about continued advancement in transportation. When the highway system and suburbs were built in the 50s, this was also the peak of science-fiction optimism about the future, and people likely assumed that advances like flying cars and other super-fast transportation systems would make distance a minor consideration.

Unfortunately, none of these things ever happened and our transportation capacities are no better now than they were sixty or seventy years ago. But many of us are stuck living in communities planned with the expectation of continuous improvement that never came. There's a metaphor in there somewhere.

It's funny how "space age" people thought we'd have jetpacks but never really anticipated anything like smartphones. All the innovation happened with (mostly destructive) communications technology, not transportation.

There is a huge disconnect between the promises of Technological innovation and that long-term consequences that would result.

I do wish God is more directly ruling us now. To sort out the complexities of how to run things.
 

Pelagius

Robin
Great article Roosh, I've really enjoyed your journey thus far, it has many similarities with my own actually and reading this brought back a lot of memories.

I think It's often hard to relive that moment of vulnerability you feel when you first experience the big city, for the most part because it's easier to forget that we lost our way among the crowds.

I still remember first experiencing the endless noise that permeates the mind drowning out your inner most thoughts. The blank hopeless expressions on the faces of the people forced to go to a job they hate every morning, bustling their way through the sea of people walking the opposite direction, all destined for the same life-draining desks.

In the beginning you experience the paradox of being able to go wherever you want, but not going anywhere because all places at all times are full of an overwhelming energy that feels as though it would swallow you full. A million people walk past you with a million different stories and somehow it leaves you feeling more empty, like you're stuck alone between a glass terminal watching life happen before your eyes but never being able to reach out and touch it.

The lack of nature almost becomes a euphemism for the masses, wandering like disconnected leaves trying both to forget their past and mindlessly being blown into an unknown future.

Sitting inside of your empty rental apartment becomes even lonelier so eventually the days would be spent in the coffee shop pretending to work whilst fantasising over the waitress and trying to avoid the expats desperate for conversation. The evenings would be spent trying to find the best bar or club to drown out the inner cry of a soul that was becoming darker in this new quest for ultimate power, where people became things and women were pleasure objects.

I knew what those cries for help meant though, I just didn't have value yet. Once I had enough value i'd be living the high life with riches and I won't feel like this anymore, surrounded by people vying for my attention i'd finally be happy and i'd forget all of this.

As my discontent with life rose ever higher so did my discontent with the external, I found myself becoming nastier, more mean spirited and desperate to feel approval for my critique of others, essentially I was becoming like everyone else.

The wheels of that life actually began to come off when I visited the country side for a short time. During that time my mind became filled with images that I can only describe as hell. Similar to Roosh's experience I had constant flashing of demonic images and dreams that would only go away so long as I was glued to my phone or laptop and lost in my escapism. A moments silence felt like the walls were coming in so i'd race to put on the rap music that i'd used to pump me up in the city and get back into the 'alpha' mode, I needed to man up - that was the answer, so I spent the rest of the time immersed in music and exercise until I could escape back to the city.

Given that I had lived like this before I was deeply disturbed that I could not spend a moment alone now so when I returned to the city I tried to go for a week without adult material, rap music or anything that would trigger me. On the second day, I broke down and found myself praying to a God I had sworn I didn't believe in.

From that day forward I made a promise to God that I would stop this lifestyle and it sounds tremendously cliche but my entire life changed almost over night.

I can't explain it other than it was as though God gave me new eyes, from that moment forward my entire life changed in the very same city. When I began to see others as my brothers and sisters it was as though God unlocked this level of the city in which I was suddenly introduced by freak coincidences to good natured people that I had no idea existed before. Hours wasted in coffee shops became hours spent redoing things I had once loved and evenings in the club were now spent in quiet gatherings with people that shared the light of their soul with the dim flicker of my own. Doors opened that were closed before and everything fell into place.

I get that all of this sounds very evangelical and like a copy-pasta of Roosh's experience but I have actually found that this somewhat common among men that fled their countries to live the nomadic lifestyle without ever really getting deep in the culture. Eventually the lack of roots and belonging get to you, it becomes hard to stay but harder to go back and once when you would run towards sin with joy, now you find yourself walking towards it out of habit.

I am just happy that I only spent the years from 18-26 like this.

As the article points out, It was not the city that had corrupted me so much as I had used the city to lose myself in the corruption, and the lonelier I felt to more corruption I wanted.
 

Pangloss

Pigeon
I recently arrived in a big city again after years in smaller cities.

Before, when I was younger, the big city was exciting, colourful, and energetic. I can now see it for what it is from a more sober viewpoint, especially when contemplating staying here for the medium-term. It seems dirty, chaotic, and full of people seeking refuge from the light in the shadows of anonymity.

The women here are mostly liberal atheists and firm believers in progressive ideology. Lots of broken people acclimatised to media lies and the unreality of an existence where they get paid good salaries to work unnecessary office jobs to avoid facing fundamental life decisions until it's too late. The living standards are really quite low for most and it is very overcrowded - people pay a premium to live a permanent party lifestyle, even when it's past time they left.

It occurred to me that, fundamentally, there's a right way and a wrong way to live; we all know what this entails in essence. The right way is hard and involves creating beauty, seeking truth, behaving honourably, and maintaining dignity. The big city is the perfect place to choose the wrong way.

This hit home for me when I was watching a (relatively obscure) video series that's around twenty years old. There was a female actress (not well-known) that was tall, charismatic, beautiful - a real specimen of her kind and something for her people to be proud of. It made me happy to watch her and I wondered what she was doing now. I decided to check social media - this was a mistake. This beautiful young woman (now middle-aged) had moved to a big, degenerate city and made some...questionable life choices. I was genuinely shocked and actually felt physically ill seeing it, having, I suppose, hoped for the best for this person who made me feel hopeful and happy, and who I thought was from a less corrupted culture. A real disappointment, but perhaps I'm naive.

That's the city though - it seems that if you stay too long, you end up disappointed and corrupted to some degree.
 
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messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
I can now see it for what it is from a more sober viewpoint, especially when contemplating staying here for the medium-term. It seems dirty, chaotic, and full of people seeking refuge from the light in the shadows of anonymity.

The women here are mostly liberal atheists and firm believers in progressive ideology. Lots of broken people acclimatised to media lies and the unreality of an existence where they get paid good salaries to work unnecessary office jobs to avoid facing fundamental life decisions until it's too late. The living standards are really quite low for most and it is very overcrowded - people pay a premium to live a permanent party lifestyle, even when it's past time they left.

It occurred to me that, fundamentally, there's a right way and a wrong way to live; we all know what this entails in essence. The right way is hard and involves creating beauty, seeking truth, behaving honourably, and maintaining dignity. The big city is the perfect place to choose the wrong way.


Scripture shows us when we intently walk with God we need to be aware of individuals, around us, who try to influence our behaviour.

1 John 2:16
For everything in the world—the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life—comes not from the Father but from the world.

Jesus gives us the truth for our strength.

Luke 5:16
But Jesus often withdrew to lonely places and prayed

Are some mental disorders really demonic influences?
Ask because I lost someone who became very depressed and angry, who ended up being diagnosed with delusional thoughts/disorders.
Sometimes I wonder if some negative entity attached to this individual given the company kept. I have prayed for this individual to find peace of mind by coming to Jesus.
 
I recently arrived in a big city again after years in smaller cities.

Before, when I was younger, the big city was exciting, colourful, and energetic. I can now see it for what it is from a more sober viewpoint, especially when contemplating staying here for the medium-term. It seems dirty, chaotic, and full of people seeking refuge from the light in the shadows of anonymity.

The women here are mostly liberal atheists and firm believers in progressive ideology. Lots of broken people acclimatised to media lies and the unreality of an existence where they get paid good salaries to work unnecessary office jobs to avoid facing fundamental life decisions until it's too late. The living standards are really quite low for most and it is very overcrowded - people pay a premium to live a permanent party lifestyle, even when it's past time they left.

It occurred to me that, fundamentally, there's a right way and a wrong way to live; we all know what this entails in essence. The right way is hard and involves creating beauty, seeking truth, behaving honourably, and maintaining dignity. The big city is the perfect place to choose the wrong way.

This hit home for me when I was watching a (relatively obscure) video series that's around twenty years old. There was a female actress (not well-known) that was tall, charismatic, beautiful - a real specimen of her kind and something for her people to be proud of. It made me happy to watch her and I wondered what she was doing now. I decided to check social media - this was a mistake. This beautiful young woman (now middle-aged) had moved to a big, degenerate city and made some...questionable life choices. I was genuinely shocked and actually felt physically ill seeing it, having, I suppose, hoped for the best for this person who made me feel hopeful and happy, and who I thought was from a less corrupted culture. A real disappointment, but perhaps I'm naive.


That's the city though - it seems that if you stay too long, you end up disappointed and corrupted to some degree.

She should have chosen a good Husband and had a family with him. But since she chose wrongly. Her natural gifts were flushed down the drain
 
I think there is a lot of corruptive elements to modern cities and towns. Sometimes through the sins of what they offer such as opportunities to indulge in greed, sloth by which I mean everything being too easy and being so far removed from the land that you become hooked on convenience and always looking for an easy option rather than to work for your daily bread and develop your faith.

Sometimes cities openly expose you to evil often in subtle ways - subversive art, the layout of the cityscape ( we see this in DC - sorry Rooshbass)

occult+symbols+patterns+washington.jpg
occult-washingtondc_12.jpg
Pentagrams and a depiction of Molech.

We also see this here (take a look at the link https://sianandjackie.blogspot.com/?m=1#! ) Ignore the fluff about UFOs and look at some of the pictures awful lot of symbolism there I think you will agree? I grew up in Milton Keynes and it has a seriously unpleasant energy to it. Glad I left!

various+003.JPG

This is a shopping centre and as you can see there is a pyramid structure which neatly aligns between the two section of the building.Also notice the brutal communistic nature of the architecture. Highly oppressive!

This sculpture I also to be found in the town an uncanny resemblance don't you agree? This 'gem' is by the theatre. I think it's interesting to note that the Rothschild's are one of the largest landowners in Buckinghamshire , which is where Milton Keynes it situated.


EWS Statue and Film Clip.jpg


I don't think these thongs coincidences but what do you think?
 
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Towgunner

Woodpecker
There's no question cities are hotbeds of depravity. But, I think there are plenty of demons there. I used to go to New York on a regular basis. When there I had this acute sense of something ominous. Its a though evil was in the air and all around you, and in all actuality it truly is. New York is, of course, a very sexually depraved place. On top of that its home to the banking elites. I've worked on Wall Street for nearly two decades and I can tell you that all the cliches are true. At least as it pertains to the types of people that it attracts or, worse, creates. I'm simply at a loss of words describing just how awful some of these people truly are. I'm talking about the typical rank and file bond or equity salesperson...utterly contemptible and beyond redemption. Wall Street says its pure merit, but, that's not true. There's graff of all sorts, I've seen favoritism, nepotism (big time) and you're token coed who blows her way through. Most people are pretty incompetent, but, excel at inter office politics. Something that is truly not taught "in the book". Than you have, of course, the leadership. We all know this story. Banker bailouts and record bonuses and absolutely NO accountability. This is a horrible city.

I will say this about the millennials, they are having a positive effect on this otherwise reprehensible industry. No, they'll never change the corruption, but, if ever and industry needs some anti-bullying or a crybaby snowflake to sue them for some obscure reason...its wall street. And they have the money.

Now that Covid has revealed that you don't have to work in an office I think the cities will never recover. Sure, there will be a return of sorts as some of the workers decide to return, but, they'll be the types that prefer the office setting. Many more will opt to stay home. If, say, even 20% less commuters or people continue to work remote that's plenty to permanently change the urban experience. And good riddance to it.

I welcome this development. The day I moved out of Boston was a great day. I felt the city was a prison. At 22-23 as a new college graduate, sure, no parental supervision and bars and clubs and girls etc. It felt like the city held all this mystery and promise. That lasts for only so long and than you realize there's no mystery. That a restaurant or dive bar or club is just the same exact thing with a different name. I'm convinced just living in a city is bad for your health. Everyone lives so close together it creates this smell. And there's this grime everywhere, especially in NY. Like a film or sorts that covers everything...a mixture of dead skin and other human byproducts. Not to mention actual feces and all the spores that emanate off of it.

Its just foolish to live there.
 
I think there is a lot of corruptive elements to modern cities and towns. Sometimes through the sins of what they offer such as opportunities to indulge in greed, sloth by which I mean everything being too easy and being so far removed from the land that you become hooked on convenience and always looking for an easy option rather than to work for your daily bread and develop your faith.

Sometimes cities openly expose you to evil often in subtle ways - subversive art, the layout of the cityscape ( we see this in DC - sorry Rooshbass)

View attachment 28404
View attachment 28405
Pentagrams and a depiction of Molech.

We also see this here (take a look at the link https://sianandjackie.blogspot.com/?m=1#! ) Ignore the fluff about UFOs and look at some of the pictures awful lot of symbolism there I think you will agree? I grew up in Milton Keynes and it has a seriously unpleasant energy to it. Glad I left!

View attachment 28407

This is a shopping centre and as you can see there is a pyramid structure which neatly aligns between the two section of the building.Also notice the brutal communistic nature of the architecture. Highly oppressive!

This sculpture I also to be found in the town an uncanny resemblance don't you agree? This 'gem' is by the theatre. I think it's interesting to note that the Rothschild's are one of the largest landowners in Buckinghamshire , which is where Milton Keynes it situated.


View attachment 28406


I don't think these thongs coincidences but what do you think?
I'd say modernist and post-modernist architecture is demon inspired. How else do they manage to be so depressing, confusing and alien?As if made by twisted beings.

At least past cities are more reminiscent of Eden in many ways as Man recreates for himself a reminder of such a place. All the Beauty thereof are pale images of long lost paradise.

And even that has gone with more recent iteractions of architecture.

It's more accurate for those buildings to be mordor.
 

N°6

Ostrich
Are some mental disorders really demonic influences?
Ask because I lost someone who became very depressed and angry, who ended up being diagnosed with delusional thoughts/disorders.
Sometimes I wonder if some negative entity attached to this individual given the company kept. I have prayed for this individual to find peace of mind by coming to Jesus.

Yes some are.

The best way to explain it is that man is a spirit with a soul who wears a body. The soul is sometimes called the heart.

The soul is further divided into the will, the emotions and the mind. This is the battleground for Satanic attacks as the soul has the casting vote whether the man walks according to the spirit or the flesh.

The soul is best described as a city with fortified walls under Satanic siege. Sin will sap the défenses and allow some penetrations by hostile forces. Once inside the enemy will occupy certain quarters of the city. Rarely the entire city and certainly not the citadel which houses the will.

I - like many men here - probably need to flush malevolent spirits out of areas of the mind that relate to sex and pride.

I’m glad you used the word “attached” rather than possessed. The KJV translated the Greek word for demonised as possessed which unfortunately makes English speaking people think than Satan can completely own people like sock puppets.
 
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