Dental Health

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Had an appointment today:

Need a cleaning.
Gum inflammation.
3 cavities on back molars
Wisdom teeth partially impacted and to be removed.
Crown to be placed an a front tooth injured in sports as a kid.

Send prayers for my savings account.
What are the size of the cavities? One option is to tell him to "watch" the cavities. Then in six months he should show you evidence they're getting bigger. Dentists are too eager to drill.
 

Rogue Statistician

Robin
Protestant
What are the size of the cavities?
2 small cavities and 1 medium-ish.....all on back molars adjacent to partially impacted wisdom teeth.

One option is to tell him to "watch" the cavities. Then in six months he should show you evidence they're getting bigger. Dentists are too eager to drill.
The he is a latina.....only way my week can get better is if oral surgeon runs on diesel :)
 
On dental health, the only thing I have to say is avoid carbs and fluoride.

Sugar is already known to jack up your teeth. And no matter what kind it is, all carbs are sugar. Fluoride, I say from experience.

I had braces when I was in high school.When I got them, I became obsessed with brushing and flossing after every meal. But I got an unexpected result.

More plaque.

I did some research on it, and started avoiding fluoride after some light digging.
 

EndlessGravity

 
Banned
Protestant
Dentistry journal cannot conclude that getting dental cleanings improves periodontal health. So why are we advised to get cleanings every 6 months?

I've seen other studies pertaining to cleaning effectiveness if you have any gum disease. These suggested the deeper cleaning they typically give for these is the only way to get these under control. I'm inclined to believe this from past experience.

I drink too much coffee, so a once a year cleaning can't be passed up anyway, unfortunately.
 

Stirfry

Woodpecker
Atheist
Good day everyone- I see a lot of speculation here and I can’t address each concern individually but I am a dentist and this forum has been very helpful to me in the past so I’m happy to answer questions regarding dentistry and oral health.
 

Salinger

 
Banned
Good day everyone- I see a lot of speculation here and I can’t address each concern individually but I am a dentist and this forum has been very helpful to me in the past so I’m happy to answer questions regarding dentistry and oral health.

Stirfry, I have a few questions:

1. Is it safe to use dental tools on your own? Or at least the plaque scraper?
2. Do you need to stay above the gum line?
3. Will the biofilm that develops on these tools after use come back to harm you?
 

Stirfry

Woodpecker
Atheist
To answer your questions, Salinger:

1) It is safe to use home dental tools like the kind they sell in the drugstore. However, I wouldn’t be too aggressive with them. To me they are like slightly stronger and more rugged toothpicks.

2) The point of a real, thorough scaling and root planing is to clean below the gumline and into the periodontal pockets. However, again I don’t recommend that you do that at home with those metal instruments because you might hurt yourself.

3) The tools will be fine if you keep them clean.

I don’t recommend the use of home tools as a substitute for regular dental visits, just as a supplement.
 

kel

 
Banned
Tangential: those of you who are dentists here, if I lived near you I'd certainly go see you for my dentistry needs. Not many people are comfortable doxxing themselves here, me least of all, but those of you who are, let us know.

In general I'd love to spread my money around to honorable people. I always ask friends for recommendations whenever I need anything (dentist, tailor, plumber, piano lessons, whatever) as a form of economic solidarity, anyone here who's comfortable doxxing themselves and sells a good or service, go ahead and let us know, I'd go out of my way to support you if/when I need whatever you're offering.
 

kurtybro

Woodpecker
resident dentists: Have you done any independent research or are you simply swallowing and regurgitating everything they fed you in dental school? That's the problem with these medical professions, is that in the end the participants all bow to authoritarianism and credentialism within the system. self reinforcing cycle.
 

Stirfry

Woodpecker
Atheist
resident dentists: Have you done any independent research or are you simply swallowing and regurgitating everything they fed you in dental school? That's the problem with these medical professions, is that in the end the participants all bow to authoritarianism and credentialism within the system. self reinforcing cycle.

Well, we do have to learn the basics in school, and in dentistry those haven’t changed in a while not so much due to dogma but because the pathogenesis of decay and periodontal disease, the two main aspects of dentistry, are well known. If there’s any “research” altering that treatment it comes from experience, having been in practice for a while and learning the best approach for a particular patient.

The distrust I notice here regarding dentistry, I think, is not so much about the science as much as overcharging, or charging for procedures that don’t necessarily have to be done. Even if the dentist tries to create a problem using vague “scientific” terms, it’s really an issue of ethics, not dentistry itself.

I agree that this is a problem, one that I’ve seen it with my own eyes more times than I can count, but it’s also a problem in many other trades or professions, especially one where people have limited access to information.
 

Sam Malone

Ostrich
Catholic
Gold Member
Stirfry,

What are your thoughts on dentures ? More specifically, full extractions and full sets.

I've got crappy teeth, and will need some work soon on at least 4 teeth (and will cost a minimum of $3K). A couple of extractions and some cosmetic work. That's just what's going on now, I could be looking at more issues down the road.

Or I can drop $5K instead, get them all pulled, and essentially be 'done' with dental problems.

Thoughts ? Pros and cons ?
 

Stirfry

Woodpecker
Atheist
Sam,

I can’t really comment on someone’s specific dental treatment plan without looking at charts, radiographs, impressions, etc., but that sentiment where you just want to have all your teeth extracted, get a denture and be done with it, is not uncommon.

Unfortunately, getting dentures doesn’t mean the end of your dental problems. The bone that makes up a good portion of your jaws begins to resorb or dissolve away when no longer in use- translation: when there are no longer teeth to support. Therefore you will need periodic denture relines or even new dentures made over time as your jaw changes shape. Indeed, bone resorption reduces the vertical dimension of the lower third of your face, contributing to that “sunken” look seen in the elderly who have missing or absent teeth.

That’s the rationale behind root canal therapy and the occasional “heroic efforts” a dentist might propose to save a tooth which may seem excessive at first glance- if you are successful in preserving the original tooth, or at least the roots, that bone won’t resorb which preserves function and esthetics.

That being said, an excellent set of dentures can be constructed or even dentures that are supported by implants, which can also prevent bone resorption. The final treatment plan depends on your overall dental health, finances, and the dentist you are working with. Many of them are happy to set up a payment plan so it might be something you can discuss.
 

wojak

Pigeon
I brought this up in an earlier thread, but figure it might be at home here as well:

Does anyone have a strong opinion on orthodontists? I've been considering Invisalign recently, to correct my teeth that shifted after I failed to wear my retainer after braces when I was younger. I figure now would be the time to do it, before I get *too* old and while I can hide my mouth under a mask if I want.

This would be primarily a cosmetic procedure, it's not being pushed on me by anyone. I appreciate any input!
 

Pendleton

Pelican
Had an appointment today:

Need a cleaning.
Gum inflammation.
3 cavities on back molars
Wisdom teeth partially impacted and to be removed.
Crown to be placed an a front tooth injured in sports as a kid.

Send prayers for my savings account.

My impacted wisdom teeth haven't caused me any problems over the past couple of decades. Most dentists told me to get them removed while others said just to leave them if I don't have pain. It seems to be a common case of unnecessary surgery.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
My impacted wisdom teeth haven't caused me any problems over the past couple of decades. Most dentists told me to get them removed while others said just to leave them if I don't have pain. It seems to be a common case of unnecessary surgery.
I had mine taken out. It did relieve my TMJ problem, but a potential risk factor are cavitations, which can appears years later.
 

Rogue Statistician

Robin
Protestant
Had the procedure to remove all 4 wisdom teeth this past Thursday.

Probably could have gone without, but I was having some inflammation/infection problems on and off over the last year on the bottom set. Ended up electing to have all of them removed as I have had a cavity on every molar adjacent to the wisdom teeth.

Insurance covered a significant majority of the cost, was I only paid 400 usd out of pocket.

Moving into Day 4 with minimal pain and an overall great experience so far.
 
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