Dental Health

Jacob Robinson

Woodpecker
Catholic
What is the word on visits to have teeth cleaned?

I have been really busy with work for a while now and it has probably been over 2 years since I went in for a cleaning. Wondering if I should go in for one or just keep on skipping them.
 

ItalianStallion9

Woodpecker
Protestant
Anyone suffer with TMJ or tight jaw?
I have alot of pressure in my head and ears/jaw and I'm thinking it could be tight jaw or stress..

Anyone experienced this too?
 

DeWoken

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
A miasma of tension fills the air.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/08/...ks-fractures-coronavirus-stress-grinding.html

I thought I might have a cracked tooth a while ago but after getting x-rays done it turned out to just be some kind of bruise. So far so good.

One time my diet changed to include more stew beef instead of ground and that was a strain on the old jaw. More cutting with the kitchen knife helped.
 

SpyofMoses

Robin
Protestant
Well, I went in for my first cleaning post Corona shutdowns. It was a more normal visit than I expected, with just a few exceptions.
This is a new dentist(for me- last one moved just before shutdowns), so there was paperwork. Most of it was the usual; health history and the like. But this time, I had to sign a waiver saying I won't sue them if I get the 'rona from them(haha). I wear a bandana instead of a mask, and noone batted an eye. Got to take it off once I was past the front office. They took 20 X-rays. Never been zapped so much, I swear it's usually a dozen or less with previous dentists. Turns out I had a couple failed sealants with some small cavities forming in place of them. First time in 13 years, so I'm glad they were caught while still small. Insurance covered most everything, but I was out ~$190 for the new sealants and anti-septic. All in all, it was a mostly normal trip to a new dentist.

One thing that stood out to me: I've had gradual gum recession which has added up over the last decade. My dentist said that skipping cleanings can do that, which is what I did for most of my 20's. The few times I went to dentists they always said 'just keep doing what you're doing.' The most recession happened during a time I was super stressed and clenching my jaw often. If your gums are receding only very slowly- but your teeth are otherwise great, it might be worth it to get regular cleanings to offset that. Probably would've been worth it for me.
 

Phronema

Robin
Orthodox
I think brushing your teeth is over-advertised. In fact, dental health has very little to do with brushing your teeth (which simply cleanses your mouth). Primitive humans had stronger teeth than us. Dental health and bad breath is almost solely determined by what you eat and how much you move/exercise to prevent acidic environments from forming in your body. Salad leaves, cucumber and citrus water is a great natural way to eliminate temporary bad breath. Coconut oil works well as toothpaste, as does your own saliva.

One of the negative aspects of vegan food and processed food is that it doesn't provide you with much chewing resistance which is needed to build strong jaws and teeth (like you get from chewing on tough meat, bones and cartiledge). There is this weird modern idea that eating food "dirties down" your teeth, when it actually keeps them strong (externally and nutritionally), and that toothpaste is what "protects" them. This seems backwards to me. Healthy foods protect your teeth while toothpaste is mostly cosmetics.
 
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frankunderwood

Pigeon
Protestant
I'd like to recommend everyone read Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price. During the 1930s Price, a Canadian dentist traveled around the world to find out what effect the modern diet had on tooth decay and the proper development of dental arches by comparing the genetically identical communities that were on their traditional diets and those that had adopted modern western foods. His work is invaluable because he really went all over world and took a large amount of photos of every population, witch he uses as illustrations in the book.

The TLDR of his findings were that those living on a ancestrial diet did not have tooth decay, they did not have crowded or misaligned teeth, where not mouth breathers and were generally healthier and more moral than those on a modern western diet. His findings on crowded teeth and mouth breathing are perticularly interesting IMO as the lack of nutriets in the modern diet created those problems in one generation.

Weston-A-Price.jpg
 

HeavyHanded

Robin
Catholic
I'd like to recommend everyone read Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price. During the 1930s Price, a Canadian dentist traveled around the world to find out what effect the modern diet had on tooth decay and the proper development of dental arches by comparing the genetically identical communities that were on their traditional diets and those that had adopted modern western foods. His work is invaluable because he really went all over world and took a large amount of photos of every population, witch he uses as illustrations in the book.

The TLDR of his findings were that those living on a ancestrial diet did not have tooth decay, they did not have crowded or misaligned teeth, where not mouth breathers and were generally healthier and more moral than those on a modern western diet. His findings on crowded teeth and mouth breathing are perticularly interesting IMO as the lack of nutriets in the modern diet created those problems in one generation.

Weston-A-Price.jpg
The Weston A. Price foundation continues to do good work on nutrition and health to this day.
 

Aztecviking

Pigeon
Catholic
So i have a dilemma here. My top right second molar might be fractured. I need to get the wisdom tooth extracted anyways. But the doctor wants to give me root canals on molars 1 and 2. I just want them to take the wisdom tooth and the second molar out and not get any root canals, how would I even talk to my dentist about that?
 

Johnnyvee

Ostrich
Other Christian
So i have a dilemma here. My top right second molar might be fractured. I need to get the wisdom tooth extracted anyways. But the doctor wants to give me root canals on molars 1 and 2. I just want them to take the wisdom tooth and the second molar out and not get any root canals, how would I even talk to my dentist about that?

What will you replace them with then? Implants are very expensive after all.
 

Aztecviking

Pigeon
Catholic
What will you replace them with then? Implants are very expensive after all.
I don't want to replace them, i just want to live with no teeth if they're going to cause problems. According to the endotologist, she wants to perform root canals on the first and second molars in order to save them. After reading through this thread, i don't want to get the root canals if they're going to cause problems down the road.
 

Johnnyvee

Ostrich
Other Christian
I highly recommend that you have the root canals. It's much better than tooth extraction. Particularly for molars, since you use them for chewing all the time of course. Remember that the other teeth will adjust to the empty space and that your jaw bone beneath will sink down as well. (post extraction) You might risk having to dish out 2-4k later on in order to have it fixed with implants and maybe even grafting. You can prevent caries with dietary changes, but it's best to fix the damage that you already have with conventional dentistry. Root canals have their issues, but it's better than the alternative.
 

Aztecviking

Pigeon
Catholic
I highly recommend that you have the root canals. It's much better than tooth extraction. Particularly for molars, since you use them for chewing all the time of course. Remember that the other teeth will adjust to the empty space and that your jaw bone beneath will sink down as well. (post extraction) You might risk having to dish out 2-4k later on in order to have it fixed with implants and maybe even grafting. You can prevent caries with dietary changes, but it's best to fix the damage that you already have with conventional dentistry. Root canals have their issues, but it's better than the alternative.
Yeah. I just finished talking to an older coworker and i also asked his opinion. He told me to go ahead and get the procedure. He has had it done a couple of times but unfortunately for all his top molars he did not. He had to have them all pulled out.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I highly recommend that you have the root canals. It's much better than tooth extraction. Particularly for molars, since you use them for chewing all the time of course. Remember that the other teeth will adjust to the empty space and that your jaw bone beneath will sink down as well. (post extraction) You might risk having to dish out 2-4k later on in order to have it fixed with implants and maybe even grafting. You can prevent caries with dietary changes, but it's best to fix the damage that you already have with conventional dentistry. Root canals have their issues, but it's better than the alternative.
Why would you "highly recommend" someone you don't know to get a questionable medical procedure? Did you view his medical chart?
 

DeWoken

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I highly recommend that you have the root canals.
It's been a while since I researched on this topic. So you think you just the the root canal and then later on you have the option of taking them out anyway?

I messed up one of my molars recently :(
It's only uncomfortable sometimes and if I chew too strenuously with it, but I gather that usually these things get worse rather than better. I am not looking forward to dealing with dentists and those hygienists, as a pureblood.
 

inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
I've been using ozonated water and ozone as a pre/post brush mouth wash. Works great for breath and food smells. I prefer it over hydrogen peroxide currently.
 

Johnnyvee

Ostrich
Other Christian
Why would you "highly recommend" someone you don't know to get a questionable medical procedure? Did you view his medical chart?

We can prevent caries by dietary changes as I mentioned, (and I'm sure you know that well) but there are no better alternatives in this case! Loosing teeth is problematic, especially molars. The other teeth will probably change position and the bone below will atrophy in time. The adjacent teeth are more exposed to caries lesions as well.

It doesn't matter who he is in this case, we are all similar enough in this matter. I agree that root canals are not ideal, but still better that loosing two molars. Also dental implants have their issues, disregarding the very steep price.
 

Johnnyvee

Ostrich
Other Christian
It's been a while since I researched on this topic. So you think you just the the root canal and then later on you have the option of taking them out anyway?

I messed up one of my molars recently :(
It's only uncomfortable sometimes and if I chew too strenuously with it, but I gather that usually these things get worse rather than better. I am not looking forward to dealing with dentists and those hygienists, as a pureblood.

The options here where root canals or extraction, in which case I would always chose root canal. Loosing teeth are not good for many reasons. Doesn't mean I'm a fan of root canals, but...lesser of two evils.
 
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