Derek Chauvin Trial

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member
7c385cbf84f84252.jpeg
 

The Penitent Man

Kingfisher
Protestant
Anyone who has been in the US military, especially an officer, knows that "conduct unbecoming of an officer" was the blanket rule they could get you on for basically anything.
Kind of like this?


Refusing to administer a government sanctioned poison is conduct unbecoming of an officer and apparently mutiny. My guess is that if some fat queer organized a strike against morning PT, however, he would be celebrated as a conscientious objector.
 

Seadog

Kingfisher
Kind of like this?


Refusing to administer a government sanctioned poison is conduct unbecoming of an officer and apparently mutiny. My guess is that if some fat queer organized a strike against morning PT, however, he would be celebrated as a conscientious objector.

So turns out he had a gofundme for his defence, but it has since been removed. This is very problematic to me, because much like how facebook and twitter have become the public town square, gofundme is becoming the funding mechanism to mount an effective public defence, and the donations in a sense are an indirect form of tax.

.Real public defenders are likely a rank or two below a very pricey lawyer, but this sends the message that if your problem is of the woke variety, then you get to duke it out with the big boys. If not, then take your chances with a real public defender. Effectively they're saying "I'm not a court or a lawyer, but I'll do everything in my power to make sure he hangs... because"
 

Renzy

Pelican
Catholic

Cahill will sentence Chauvin on Friday, about two months after he oversaw the trial that ended in his conviction on charges of second- and third-degree murder, as well as second-degree manslaughter. Cahill has paved the way for Chauvin's punishment to be up to double the 15 years at the top of the range recommended under state guidelines, having ruled in May that there were four aggravating factors in Floyd's death.

In court documents filed this month, prosecutors asked that Cahill sentence Chauvin to 30 years. Chauvin's attorney, Eric Nelson, requested a downward departure from sentencing guidelines or a sentence of probation with time served.

...

"I think Judge Cahill is well aware that he isn't just punishing Derek Chauvin, but he's squarely in the middle of a larger conversation about whether the criminal court can be just in these types of cases," Gordon said. "I don't think anyone would be surprised if he follows the prosecution's recommendation and sentences Chauvin to 360 months. I wouldn't be."
 

bucky

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Saw this yesterday:


It includes this:
Under sentencing guidelines, Chauvin could get a federal penalty ranging from 27 years to more than 33 years in prison, with credit for taking responsibility, Osler said. But the guidelines are not mandatory, and Osler estimated Chauvin would be sentenced toward the lower end of the range.

According to evidence in the state case against Chauvin, Kueng and Lane helped restrain the 46-year-old Floyd as he was on the ground — Kueng knelt on Floyd’s back and Lane held down Floyd’s legs. Thao held back bystanders and kept them from intervening during the 9 1/2-minute restraint.

What else could anyone who saw the full video argue that these cops should have done differently? I know, most normies aren't even aware of the first 15-20 minutes that shows clearly wasted Floyd resisting by any means necessary, but if they were, would the argument be that it would have been best to just let him drive off like that?
 

bucky

Hummingbird
Other Christian
It looks like two of the other cops involved rejected plea deals for three years. What do you guys think? I notice that on almost any MSM article about George Floyd that allows comments, most of them seem to be from people who realize Floyd was a common criminal in the course of committing yet another crime while also intoxicated, and that the cops couldn't have been expected to do anything significantly different in the situation. I don't watch Tucker, but a lot of people do and my understanding is that he's openly called Chauvin an innocent man who everyone knows is innocent, but who we have to pretend is guilty.

Do you think the tide is turning on this whole case, in the sense of how it is perceived? It often seems like even normies are pretty close to openly acknowledging the truth about it. Obviously the MSM never will, but maybe they'll at least stop holding up George Floyd as some kind of saint and martyr and stop talking about his "murder," which is the most you could expect from them.

It's a huge risk these two ex-cops are taking. The article says "The State is ready for trial" and that they'll seek longer sentences than the standard 12 years or more if they get convictions.

https://news.yahoo.com/thao-kueng-rejected-plea-deal-150426627.html
 

It_is_my_time

Crow
Protestant
It looks like two of the other cops involved rejected plea deals for three years. What do you guys think? I notice that on almost any MSM article about George Floyd that allows comments, most of them seem to be from people who realize Floyd was a common criminal in the course of committing yet another crime while also intoxicated, and that the cops couldn't have been expected to do anything significantly different in the situation. I don't watch Tucker, but a lot of people do and my understanding is that he's openly called Chauvin an innocent man who everyone knows is innocent, but who we have to pretend is guilty.

Do you think the tide is turning on this whole case, in the sense of how it is perceived? It often seems like even normies are pretty close to openly acknowledging the truth about it. Obviously the MSM never will, but maybe they'll at least stop holding up George Floyd as some kind of saint and martyr and stop talking about his "murder," which is the most you could expect from them.

It's a huge risk these two ex-cops are taking. The article says "The State is ready for trial" and that they'll seek longer sentences than the standard 12 years or more if they get convictions.

https://news.yahoo.com/thao-kueng-rejected-plea-deal-150426627.html
Polling shows that before George Floyd and the nation-wide BLM riots of 2020, that support for BLM among Americans was over 50%. After these events, it dropped drastically. I would have to search to find these polls now. But there is no doubt that Floyd and the 2020 riots hurt BLM image greatly.

If it wasn't for Blackrock/Vanguard/State Street forcing the corporations (all of them) that they control via the stock market to push diversity, then the talk at the water cooler in the office would be about the "terrorist BLM organization" and its popularity would be next to 0.
 

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Do you think the tide is turning on this whole case, in the sense of how it is perceived?
People will only go so far.

I imagine the farthest most people will go is "Whatever he did, he should not have been knelt on until he died like that, that policeman killed him, even if unintentionally" which is the take my Republican normie pro gun friend from Texas has.

Going much further than that is difficult, because George Floyd is not an anomoly in the black community. You know that stat that 1 in 4 blacks is in the criminal justice system at any time (incarcerated, on parole, or under prosecution)?

Is that because cops be raycist? Or is it because there is a fundamental problem with that group and they commit crimes at rates much higher than the rest of our society?

I would argue that in order to go any farther than my friend's position above, one has to accept race realism and understand that a two tiered approach to our justice system is needed, because blacks simply behave differently and commit crimes at a much higher rate. And people just aren't going to go there yet.

The feds just got a life sentence for the men who apprehended the criminal in the Armed Robbery (Ahmad Aubery) case in Georgia. This was just to be spiteful, as they already got a life sentence from the state of Georgia, and this is somehow not double jeopardy because reasons.

Here is some bodycam footage of Aubery behaving very aggressively to police when asked why he is illegally parking his car in an obscure part of a city park without a valid driver license and wearing a long fur coat in the middle of a hot sunny day in an area known for drug dealing. He is so belligerant that he is almost tazed, except the weapon malfunctions. I've seen much less aggressive cases where the suspect ends up dead (not defending the police, just saying it could have easily happened here).



Again, how out of the ordinary is this behavior for the black community?
We are not supposed to resist or challenge these people when they invade our neighborhoods. Or else we will be locked up for the rest of our lives. Kinda makes the whole "right to bear arms" thing pointless.

 
Top