Diet help...

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
The title is simple .

After I lost the rest of my stomach to cancer, It's immensely difficult to keep the calories up in a conducive fashion.

I'm trying to find some non gluten grains and cereals that I can buy to stock up on, and help keep the weight on... Ya know ways to doubly get my vitamins and starches and ways to keep a decent intake of protein (heck I'm considering alternative meat sources such as bugs but only for the sake of necessity but am refusing to go that route of über processed beyond meat garbage that's like, just straight up chemicals )
I'm trying to avoid overly processed foods that provide no nutritional value and do most of the processing myself like cooking & prepping etc.

I can not eat the following:bean hulls (the "meat"of the bean is fine, the fibrous shell I can't chew well enough)
Milk; cheese; unprocessed raw nuts; red meat; oils; heavy animal fats; cream; high concentrations of sugar in 1 serving;& foods that can't be chewed into fine paste essentially.

90% of vegetables are off limits because of the skin and fiber associated with them....I DO although enjoy highly processed juices/presses to get nutrients from things like "Naked" brand drinks.

I use a blender a LOT to aid with digestion along with lot of vinegar and lemon juices to help break down starches and proteins before eating...
I love beans, but have to follow a Nigerian method to remove the hulls/skins


I can eat any just about any chicken/seafood/ white meat (no ... Not pork sadly), rice, rice noodles and juices without the fiber.

If I gotta take fiber I usually take a 1 a day fiber supplement that has inulin in it to keep things regular


I can't eat wheat or gluten and that good forsaken junk is seemingly in everything. I just recently discovered millet... Currently researching more non gluten grains to eat. I've tried buckwheat, didn't really care for it. Gonna try millet tomorrow. Bought a 2lb bag of it at my local Vietnamese store for relatively inexpensive.

Any tips, recipes and ideas that fit the outliers be and limitations listed that you guys can help me brainstorm would be appreciated !

Edit: peanut butter, almond butter, cashew butter, etc my duodenum cannot process... Not sure why but, it comes back up after eating every time so I've just given up.


Another burden of mine that I have which I'm grateful for to Christ glory be to God is the fact that I have to wait for my food to either warm up or cool off to a near lukewarm temperature before I can actually consume it. If I don't I get extreme pains in my belly and usually vomit afterwards... So foods that I can process and make that don't taste too bad at room temperature will be also helpful... thank you !!!
 
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christie2

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
I'm sure there's lots of options.
I'm going to cook up some congee tonight, add shredded poached chicken and figure out some tasty flavouring.

I'll post recipe when I'm satisfied. Its fun to overcome dietary challenges!
 

messaggera

Pelican
Woman
Other Christian
Sorry to hear you experienced cancer. Hopefully you can find some meals to make and to enjoy.

Can you process fruits and eggs? Almond or cashew milk?
What vegetables can you digest? How about what spices are off limits, ginger, and is honey okay?
How about trout, perch, walleye, salmon, turkey?

Do you think it is an inflammatory issue with most of these foods you can not eat?
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
Sorry to hear you experienced cancer.

I'm not. Satan struck me with this, and now my focus on Logos is even more fervent. Praise him for these struggles !!!!
Christ is risen




> Can you process fruits and eggs? Almond or cashew milk?

Fruits have to be blended into dang near liquid, eggs,...uh I'm at the point where I just make them suuuuuuuper runny. Coarse Textures mess with the belly too.
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
Can you process fruits and eggs? Almond or cashew milk?

I make the eggs super runny.
Cashew/almond milk I vomit . No clue as to why.

What vegetables can you digest?
Any as long as I blend into liquid with my blender

How about what spices are off limits,
Small quantities of spices. Hot spices are completely off limits (like habanero/jalapeño) those will bring me into extreme belly pains
ginger, and is honey okay?
Ginger in very small doses, honey is good when diluted.
How about trout, perch, walleye, salmon, turkey?
Low fatty content fish is always good. Most of my pancreas was removed so fatty foods are very tough for me to eat .

Do you think it is an inflammatory issue with most of these foods you can not eat?
I honestly don't know.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
With juicing, and with being able to eat chicken and seafood, it sounds like you can get enough vitamins and minerals, and you can get enough proteins. Fats would be the best way to get your calories up, but it sounds like this is where you have the greatest difficulty. Can you eat salmon? It is fattier than other types of fish. Beans have some fat. Maybe you can focus on the higher fat items within the types of foods that work for you.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
Just tried salmon yesterday, and it's a no-go. Constant bile-burn (like stomach acid heartburn but 100x worse) I even tried to mix it with rice thinking that'd help. Nope sadly not.

I think because it's a fattier fish @Thomas More
I wondered if that might be the case. I'm sorry to hear it is. It seems like fats are the hardest for you to digest, but they are the main way to raise your calorie intake. I guess I'd try to find where the limit is as far as fat content in your meals. Beans have some fat, and it sounds like you can eat them, although only with special preparation. It may be that you can manage only a low percentage of your food in the form of fats, but it's not zero. I'd find out just how much you can eat successfully, and make that your target.
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
I wondered if that might be the case. I'm sorry to hear it is. It seems like fats are the hardest for you to digest, but they are the main way to raise your calorie intake. I guess I'd try to find where the the limit is as far as fat content in your meals. Beans have some fat, and it sounds like you can eat them, although only with special preparation. It may be that you can manage only a low percentage of your food in the form of fats, but it's not zero. I'd find out just how much you can eat successfully, and make that your target.
Agreed. I'm stocking up on rice currently. Already have 100lbs of it and I buy 20xtra lbs of it every time I go grocery basmati, Jasmine, and standard white. The millet I am preparing now. (No idea why we throw this in bird seed as filler... It's a really good food to have)
 

TMarie

Sparrow
Woman
Catholic
The title is simple .

After I lost the rest of my stomach to cancer, It's immensely difficult to keep the calories up in a conducive fashion.

I'm trying to find some non gluten grains and cereals that I can buy to stock up on, and help keep the weight on... Ya know ways to doubly get my vitamins and starches and ways to keep a decent intake of protein (heck I'm considering alternative meat sources such as bugs but only for the sake of necessity but am refusing to go that route of über processed beyond meat garbage that's like, just straight up chemicals )
I'm trying to avoid overly processed foods that provide no nutritional value and do most of the processing myself like cooking & prepping etc.

I can not eat the following:bean hulls (the "meat"of the bean is fine, the fibrous shell I can't chew well enough)
Milk; cheese; unprocessed raw nuts; red meat; oils; heavy animal fats; cream; high concentrations of sugar in 1 serving;& foods that can't be chewed into fine paste essentially.

90% of vegetables are off limits because of the skin and fiber associated with them....I DO although enjoy highly processed juices/presses to get nutrients from things like "Naked" brand drinks.

I use a blender a LOT to aid with digestion along with lot of vinegar and lemon juices to help break down starches and proteins before eating...
I love beans, but have to follow a Nigerian method to remove the hulls/skins


I can eat any just about any chicken/seafood/ white meat (no ... Not pork sadly), rice, rice noodles and juices without the fiber.

If I gotta take fiber I usually take a 1 a day fiber supplement that has inulin in it to keep things regular


I can't eat wheat or gluten and that good forsaken junk is seemingly in everything. I just recently discovered millet... Currently researching more non gluten grains to eat. I've tried buckwheat, didn't really care for it. Gonna try millet tomorrow. Bought a 2lb bag of it at my local Vietnamese store for relatively inexpensive.

Any tips, recipes and ideas that fit the outliers be and limitations listed that you guys can help me brainstorm would be appreciated !

Edit: peanut butter, almond butter, cashew butter, etc my duodenum cannot process... Not sure why but, it comes back up after eating every time so I've just given up.


Another burden of mine that I have which I'm grateful for to Christ glory be to God is the fact that I have to wait for my food to either warm up or cool off to a near lukewarm temperature before I can actually consume it. If I don't I get extreme pains in my belly and usually vomit afterwards... So foods that I can process and make that don't taste too bad at room temperature will be also helpful... thank you !!!
Have you tired Quinoa? It is gluten free and very healthy. It can be cooked in a rice cooker. It turns out perfect every time I use the rice cooker.

How to Cook Quinoa in a Rice Cooker

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (170 g) of quinoa
  • 1 3⁄4 cups (410 ml) of water, 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 g) of salt
Rinse the quinoa in cold water.
Put 1 cup (170 g) of quinoa into a fine mesh strainer or sieve and hold it under cold running water. Use your hands to swish the quinoa around as you rinse it.[1]
It's important to rinse quinoa before cooking it since this will remove the seed's bitter covering.
Put the quinoa, cold water, and salt into the rice cooker.
Scoop the rinsed quinoa into your rice cooker and add 1 3⁄4 cups (410 ml) of cool or cold water. Then, stir in 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 g) of salt to flavor your quinoa as it cooks.[2]
Avoid using hot water, which can give the quinoa a gummy texture.
Cover the rice cooker and turn it on.
Put the lid on your rice cooker and turn it on.
Both white rice and quinoa need about 15 minutes to cook.
Let the quinoa sit for 3 to 5 minutes before you fluff it with a fork.
Keep the lid on the rice cooker and unplug the machine. The quinoa will finish steaming as it rests for a few minutes.
After about 5 minutes, lift the lid and fluff the quinoa gently with a fork.[4]
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
Have you tired Quinoa? It is gluten free and very healthy. It can be cooked in a rice cooker. It turns our perfect every time I use the rice cooker.

How to Cook Quinoa in a Rice Cooker

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (170 g) of quinoa
  • 1 3⁄4 cups (410 ml) of water, 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 g) of salt
Rinse the quinoa in cold water.
Put 1 cup (170 g) of quinoa into a fine mesh strainer or sieve and hold it under cold running water. Use your hands to swish the quinoa around as you rinse it.[1]
It's important to rinse quinoa before cooking it since this will remove the seed's bitter covering.
Put the quinoa, cold water, and salt into the rice cooker.
Scoop the rinsed quinoa into your rice cooker and add 1 3⁄4 cups (410 ml) of cool or cold water. Then, stir in 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 g) of salt to flavor your quinoa as it cooks.[2]
Avoid using hot water, which can give the quinoa a gummy texture.
Cover the rice cooker and turn it on.
Put the lid on your rice cooker and turn it on.
Both white rice and quinoa need about 15 minutes to cook.
Let the quinoa sit for 3 to 5 minutes before you fluff it with a fork.
Keep the lid on the rice cooker and unplug the machine. The quinoa will finish steaming as it rests for a few minutes.
After about 5 minutes, lift the lid and fluff the quinoa gently with a fork.[4]


The chewing part is the biggest difficulty. It's so small I can't chew it well enough.
I'm legitimately considering getting a baby food blender for stuff like that.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
During fasting periods I frequently drink smoothies made with fruit and peanuts. Planters are noticeably better than generic. Peanuts are high in fat and protein and the fruits are carbs, so it's an all around good meal. You can put a lot of peanuts in one of those smoothies.

What about milk can you not have? If it's the lactose or the whey you could also try a casein protein powder.
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
During fasting periods I frequently drink smoothies made with fruit and peanuts. Planters are noticeably better than generic. Peanuts are high in fat and protein and the fruits are carbs, so it's an all around good meal. You can put a lot of peanuts in one of those smoothies.

What about milk can you not have? If it's the lactose or the whey you could also try a casein protein powder.
I think it's the lactose, I'm a bit sketchy about trying whey proteins due to the derivative of it being a milk product. I may experiment on a weekday that I'm not working to see how it treats me.

Currently boiling up some delicious chicken with onions and garlic right now :p
 

fireshark

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Can you do oats?

I also have to eat gluten free as I found I'm allergic to wheat (after years of unidentified digestive issues - basically GERD) In the US we have a quality brand called Bobos that makes very dense and filling oat bars and other oat-based products. But any oats would be great.

I always eat oats room temperature or slightly warm. I never eat cold cereal as that's a major trigger for my GERD.
 
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