Distilled water, is it safe to drink?

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
What happened to you after three weeks?
There was more than one variable happening and I already had multiple symptoms from drinking tap water abroad that was not pathogenic, did not contain organisms, but contained some combination of heavy metals and perhaps pesticides. A hair test for metals revealed the excess of several elements, like aluminum.

The new and sudden symptoms were fatigue and reduction in ability to cycle and exercise, as well as a 10x increase in sunburn sensitivity that quickly resulted in loss of skin pigment. It came after three weeks of drinking water from an atmospheric water generator, which is a machine that removes water from the air and puts it through a variety of filters: RO, carbon, and UV; this is equivalent to distilled water. I was trying this machine because I lived abroad and could not find a reliable source of spring water.
 

Bright_Sun

Pigeon
I've been drinking distilled water since I was a child for about 15 years now, and I haven't developed any serious health problems. I make my own with a Waterwise distiller, and normally, distilled water is the only thing I drink. I rarely drink anything else.

If anything, I've noticed that I am far healthier than my peers. This is also because I eat a very healthy diet compared to most people.

Some people claim that drinking distilled water will leech minerals from your body, but I haven't noticed any problems with that. As long as you eat a healthy, balanced diet and take supplements (like a multivitamin, vitamin C, vitamin D, and iodine), you should be fine.
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Drinking distilled (or what I drink, Reverse Osmosis) water is FAR better than tap water.
You are not drinking estrogen from the remnants of birth control pills which seep into the water supply.


Hmm... fish do not directly consume city drinking water. If the runoff from our city drinking water is harming fish, what is it doing when it's piped straight into our homes?

You're not drinking all the chemicals and compounds and poisons and things your municipal water company cannot or does not remove. And you're not drinking chlorine or fluoride.

If you're concerned about mineral loss, take vitamins or collodial minerals, eat extra root vegetables. Or you can buy spring water. But the benefits of drinking distilled or RO water FAR outweight the risks.

Most people drink tap water. If you are drinking purified water and lack a few minerals, you're still far better off than the vast majority who are loaded up with estrogens and phytoestrogens and glyphosates and even solids that would make you cringe.
 

Hannibal

Ostrich
Gold Member
Thanks for all the replies.

I think I will go back to drinking distilled, although I may attempt to remineralize it with some sea salt, as I did notice some lightheadedness when drinking it.

One of things that scares me about distilled water is that it will allegedly leech nickel from stainless steel, so I do not know how I will make my coffee.
 

ItalianStallion9

Woodpecker
The tap water from my faucet tested over 600ppm with a TDS tester. My friends/family thought I was nuts for saying it tasted like metallic dirt, and now the water tester proved it.
Right now I'm using a reverse osmosis water system with a remineralizer (adding link to bottom) -tests well and tastes fantastic. One flaw of spring water is that it's often in plastic bottles - and plastic is no good.

The amount of minerals we get from water is low (under 10% DV). You can always add some pink salt to water if you like it heavier. We get most of our vitamins/minerals from food anyway. Many sailors would drink distilled water for months. I'm convinced the globalists shun distilled water and push flouride/atrazine tap water for obvious reasons.

My advice: get a TDS water tester online (about $15) and immediately stop drinking that tap water if it's high in PPM. Switch to reverse osmosis or gravity filtered water and put it into *glass* pitchers/cups.

 

nagareboshi

Woodpecker
Does anyone here have experience using a countertop reverse osmosis filter (i.e., no installation required)?. I'm currently renting and am not able to install something under the sink.
 

ItalianStallion9

Woodpecker
Does anyone here have experience using a countertop reverse osmosis filter (i.e., no installation required)?. I'm currently renting and am not able to install something under the sink.
Those can be ugly and still expensive. If someone has tested it, let me know the results.

One of these distillers is an option (I bought one and the water is 0ppm): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0855STRPK/

In addition, you can get one of those big gravity filters: https://alexapure.com/products/alexapure-pro-water-filtration-system
 

Hannibal

Ostrich
Gold Member
Those can be ugly and still expensive. If someone has tested it, let me know the results.

One of these distillers is an option (I bought one and the water is 0ppm): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0855STRPK/

In addition, you can get one of those big gravity filters: https://alexapure.com/products/alexapure-pro-water-filtration-system
Thanks for the recommendation. I purchased an alexapure gravity filter and the water is about 100x tastier than what comes out of the tap. Its reasonably fast too and good for 5000 gallons per filter.
It will likely pay for itself many times over as I have been drinking it and dont notice any kind of craving for anything else like soda.
 
Distilled water + trace minerals = great mineralization and structured drink. Structured water is balanced and health, it can be done by passing it from jug to jug, pouring it back and forth, and by praying. Add some things like celtic sea salt, cayenne powder, and ginger powder in your water when you're out walking in the heat, and it will help you. Yes ideally we would all have access to good, clean, healthy water, but we don't. I do the spring thing when I have time and space, but for living in the human cities distilled is the best option to go to because you can control exactly what you put in your water.
 

Matthewww

Pigeon
I've been drinking distilled water for almost two years, and have had no negative health effects. I don't want to drink the lead, mercury, atrazine, hormonal birth control excretion, glyphosphate, microplastic, fluoride, chlorine, etc. I mix a Vitamin C powder in my water bottle, and that contains electrolytes, so if depleting electrolytes is a concern, they're easy to add back in after removing all the garbage.
 

Batman_

Kingfisher
I'm content to focus mostly on avoiding flouride because that's the only thing in tap water that really concerns me. So, I'm considering buying a filter called Clearly Filtered and see if I notice any changes after trying it.

I would try distilled water, but the amount of plastics you end up dealing with (which are xenoestrogenic) don't seem like a good tradeoff, plus its ludicrously expensive.

I think this whole obsession over drinking water is a giant mess and most people don't know what they're talking about.
 

inthefade

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
Does anyone own a Berkey filter? I don’t (they’re hella expensive) but one of my former health nut roommates owned one and the water definitely had a much different neutral taste than you get with a standard Brita.

As far as I know, Berkeys are expensive at first, but the filters last a very long time (like a few years compared to 3 months with a Brita), and you can filter stuff like rainwater and make it potable.
I love my big berkey. I have the fluoride filters but haven't put them in yet.
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Does anyone here have experience using a countertop reverse osmosis filter (i.e., no installation required)?. I'm currently renting and am not able to install something under the sink.

I bought an atmospheric water generator (AWG) a few months ago. I bought it because I am also in temp. accommodation, so didn't want to do anything with the water pipes. This is essentially a dehumidifier attached to reverse osmosis and a chiller/heater.

I did a lot of research prior, and one of the main things from the most authoritative (as far as I could tell) sources was to get something that includes remineralisation. If you follow that, that means all the gravity filters are out, and their purifying ability is limited too.

My conclusion was the gold standard is a multi-stage under-the-sink-system hooked up to a chiller in the fridge. Ideally from rain water collected water.

An AWG is over-kill. It's going to be about 5X over an under-the-sink system.

The upside is it is probably the best water you can get unless you are using rain-water collection. As the water does not come from the contaminated mains water listed above. It ill also give you a source of HQ water in a survival situation. So long as you have electricity and filters.

The downsides are, at least my machine is quite noisy. I have it in a studio apartment and I have to turn it off at night. It is also limited in supply. I think mine can produce about 15L per day, but I am not sure and where I live is incredibly humid. The chilling of the water is not low enough for my taste. I still put it in glasses in the fridge.

You can get some couter-top AWGs, which can hold about 5 litres. But the companies that make them don't tend to stay around for long. I think the reason for this is - if you want "clean" water, an AWG is not economical compared to other solutions. It will be over two years before it breaks-even with those water canisters that go on chillers.
 

inthefade

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
I bought an atmospheric water generator (AWG) a few months ago. I bought it because I am also in temp. accommodation, so didn't want to do anything with the water pipes. This is essentially a dehumidifier attached to reverse osmosis and a chiller/heater.

I did a lot of research prior, and one of the main things from the most authoritative (as far as I could tell) sources was to get something that includes remineralisation. If you follow that, that means all the gravity filters are out, and their purifying ability is limited too.

My conclusion was the gold standard is a multi-stage under-the-sink-system hooked up to a chiller in the fridge. Ideally from rain water collected water.

An AWG is over-kill. It's going to be about 5X over an under-the-sink system.

The upside is it is probably the best water you can get unless you are using rain-water collection. As the water does not come from the contaminated mains water listed above. It ill also give you a source of HQ water in a survival situation. So long as you have electricity and filters.

The downsides are, at least my machine is quite noisy. I have it in a studio apartment and I have to turn it off at night. It is also limited in supply. I think mine can produce about 15L per day, but I am not sure and where I live is incredibly humid. The chilling of the water is not low enough for my taste. I still put it in glasses in the fridge.

You can get some couter-top AWGs, which can hold about 5 litres. But the companies that make them don't tend to stay around for long. I think the reason for this is - if you want "clean" water, an AWG is not economical compared to other solutions. It will be over two years before it breaks-even with those water canisters that go on chillers.
which one did you buy, and does it work well?
 
I'm content to focus mostly on avoiding flouride because that's the only thing in tap water that really concerns me. So, I'm considering buying a filter called Clearly Filtered and see if I notice any changes after trying it.

I would try distilled water, but the amount of plastics you end up dealing with (which are xenoestrogenic) don't seem like a good tradeoff, plus its ludicrously expensive.

I think this whole obsession over drinking water is a giant mess and most people don't know what they're talking about.
Most chains in North America sell distilled water by the gallon for 89 cents to 99 cents. The refreshe brand is good, so is the vitamin cottage and the whole foods 365 brand, if you're stuck in an urban city with no distiller of your own. Just add minerals and amino acids and whatever else you need, and you wont be drinking "empty" or unbalanced water. Humic and Fulvic acid blend water is good to drink too.

I advocate distilled water especially for cooking, and for drinking when you do not know what is in your surrounding water system (high lead, cadmium, fluoride, estrogen, etc). If you have your own land and access to fresh water there are other options which would purify it further. I've seen a set up where a guy would re-route water from a river, in timed sequences, into a large boiler, then into a cooling tank, thus removing any water-borne illness-causing agents like giardia, whilst getting the cleanliness of non-metallized water. Iodine tablets are ok if you are on a camp or a trek and don't have any testing equipment (expensive but a worthy investment for transitioning to off-the-grid or rural life).
 
Top