Divorce due to Catholicism

Cervantes

Woodpecker
Some sacraments. For instance, Protestants can perform a valid baptism. Confession would not be valid as Orthodox don't have the "keys". I can't speak to all the details of each sacrament.

OP - you could consider this your first test of face as a Catholic and it may be a big one. There is no divorce in Catholicism, so she will be "put away" and unable to remarry or have a boyfriend (aka fornicate). I know this is true if the Marriage was done in a Catholic Church, but consult your Priest, perhaps if the marriage was at a justice of the peace then there is some wiggle room. Not that you want to get divorced, but remember the sword will divide. Your job as wife is to obey in all things that do not directly contravene God. If he "hates" the Catholic Church and is exploring Judaism, then he essentially is hating God. Judaism denies Jesus Christ, and therefore denies God.
If either spouse is a baptized Catholic then marriage only counts if it is celebrated in a Catholic ceremony. Otherwise it is not recognized due to "lack of canonical form".

 

NoMoreTO

Ostrich
I’m not going to divorce my husband. But I’d like to see if he’d change his mind and go toward orthodox.

You can't divorce your husband if you are Catholic.

If he's going towards judaism then he is going in the opposite direction of Christianity. He could have decided to become a baptist.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
You can't divorce your husband if you are Catholic.

If he's going towards judaism then he is going in the opposite direction of Christianity. He could have decided to become a baptist.
The pre-Vatican 2 rules are if you're not married in the RCC, it's not a marriage under the RCC, so there can be no divorce because there is no marriage (essentially, a tautology).

Technically, under the rules of the RCC, if you're not married under the RCC, then you're also committing a sin by fornicating outside of marriage. I'm fairly confident the modern Catholic church doesn't enforce those rules anymore; however, those rules are still in force even if the modern Catholic church refuses to enforce them.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I’m not going to divorce my husband. But I’d like to see if he’d change his mind and go toward orthodox.
It can be a long road in my experience just FYI, so think about a slow change possibly over many years. I, of course, agree that you shouldn’t divorce and split up the family. You can’t give up hope in the Holy Spirit. If you’re husband will go to an Orthodox Church, that is great! Personally, I think it’s very important to get your family into a church, period. Keep praying for your husband. Pray with your children. Teach them the Bible and how to pray. Let God take care of the rest.
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
Unless you have biblical grounds for not obeying your husband, God requires you to submit to him. This means not practising a religion he does not approve of. If he wants you to practise any religion besides Christianity, and you are certain that you are a Christian, then biblically your marriage is invalid, as God forbids unequally yoked marriage.
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
The first discussion you should have is why your husband is favourable towards Judaism. Have a series of discussions on it, being genuinely interested in his perspective, gaining insight into his needs.
 

get2choppaaa

Pelican
While I generally think its a bad idea to give marriage advice... and almost never think divorce is suitable... If your husband is thinking of becoming a Jew (unless ethnically Jewish ... and just previously not practicing or some permutation of that) he is filled with the revolutionary spirit.

I've been through a nasty divorce, and I don't advise it. But you owe your kids an upbringing in The Church. I grew up Protestant, Ex was Southern Baptist. IT was totally spiritually incompatible. I met my wife now after a couple years of being single and searching for the Truth. She followed me to Church after our second date and it has taken off since then. .

It really does change how you see the world and how you see each other. When there are frustrations and one wants to give into worldly stubbornness and passions, knowing that The Church is there makes a lot of the strife seem superfluous. It grounds you and keeps you optimistic and with the right perspective.

SO from my experience... faith is probably one of the few things to get divorced over.

Good luck and I pray you and your husband can find an agreement for the kids sake but also for your own salvation's sake.
 

Ah_Tibor

Robin
Woman
I don’t think he or myself can even become Jewish! (No Jewish line in either family.)

You probably could (in theory) but Jews aren't terribly receptive to converts. I think some reform types are. But the question is-- would he really want to?

Research doesn't necessarily mean it's something you *want* to do. I found Zoroastrianism interesting for awhile. I don't want to be a Zoroastrian. I've also read more about cults than is healthy, and I do not want to join a cult. (I'm definitely a rabbit hole type person hahaha)

I also read a lot about Judaism as a teenager. I liked a lot of Jewish writers, and I found Hasidim vaguely interesting (it originated in the Carpathians, for one). But Judaism is fundamentally different from Christianity not only in belief, but also its tone and spirit. If he doesn't like papal infallibility, he probably won't like blind adherence to tradition either.
 

Cervantes

Woodpecker
The pre-Vatican 2 rules are if you're not married in the RCC, it's not a marriage under the RCC, so there can be no divorce because there is no marriage (essentially, a tautology).

Technically, under the rules of the RCC, if you're not married under the RCC, then you're also committing a sin by fornicating outside of marriage. I'm fairly confident the modern Catholic church doesn't enforce those rules anymore; however, those rules are still in force even if the modern Catholic church refuses to enforce them.
No.

Marriages among non-Catholic Christians or even among non-Christians are considered valid.

The RCC only requires that the ceremony be performed by the Church when least one of the people is a baptized or confirmed Catholic.

RCC does not recognize the dissolution of any valid marriage - even among non-Catholics.

RCC would for example recognize the marriage between two Anglicans, or two Jews but would not recognize their divorce.

But if a Catholic married an Anglican in an Anglican ceremony that marriage would not be recognized. If that couple got a civil divorce the RCC would not require (or even allow) an annulment - since the marriage was never recognized by the Church in the first place.
 

FactusIRX

Kingfisher
But if a Catholic married an Anglican in an Anglican ceremony that marriage would not be recognized. If that couple got a civil divorce the RCC would not require (or even allow) an annulment - since the marriage was never recognized by the Church in the first place.
Yeah, that's exactly what I said, so I don't know why you are disagreeing with me.
 
Last edited:
Top