Does anyone vegetable garden?

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I’ve casually grown things now and again, but since we moved to the country this summer I’m more serious about it. I’ll be starting seeds indoors this year since I’m growing so much. I’m also growing a lot of heirloom varieties you can’t find at any big box store so seeds it is plus I’ll be able to save seed. I went crazy and had 14 tomato varieties. I trimmed it down to 6, lol. This was my plan long before the scamdemic, but it may come in handy to know how to do this stuff. I’m growing tomatoes, jalapeños, cucumbers, cantaloupe, lettuce, chard, kale, sweet and regular potatoes. And squash and beans.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
I grew up home gardening and small-scale farming, but this past year was the first year I've had my own garden as an adult.

I feel kind of meh about it. Hard to feel like it's worth it when all we have room for is a few small raised beds and a handful of containers. The processes don't really scale down.

It's kind of like baking: I have to drag all of the equipment and ingredients out and go through all of the steps whether I'm making six cookies or six dozen cookies. As someone who used to bake commercially, I feel nothing short of ripped off every time I bake a small batch of something in my tiny home kitchen. With greater capacity, I could have turned the same amount of work (or possibly less) into about ten times the production output. I don't like that feeling.

That's how I felt looking at my two dozen or so strawberry plants this past summer, compared to the rolling hillsides covered in thousands of them that I used to help grow and harvest when I was a kid.

My 2020 garden was very experimental. I grew a lot of things to learn what will grow well with our less-than-optimal soil/sunlight arrangement. Next year I'm going to scale it back quite a lot, and only grow things that will perform well and which will be substantially cheaper to grow than to buy - or where the quality differential just makes it worth it.

The star of my 2020 garden was my tomatoes. They're notoriously hard to grow around here, so I put them in containers and chose their location pretty carefully. I only had four tomato plants, but we harvested a LOT of tomatoes. We were still harvesting toward the end of October. We could have had tomatoes ripening into November, probably, if I hadn't been lazy and neglected to pick the ones that were starting to blush before the cold and rain really set in and they started getting mushy. I'm gonna grow a lot of tomatoes next year. This year we just bought starts from a local store, so the varieties weren't the best (though the "early girl" was very tasty, I might do that one again). Going to be more choosy for next year. I got really spoiled on homegrown heirloom tomatoes growing up.

I'm also going to grow more flowers - because they're something that will reliably grow in a lot of the places that aren't really suitable for crop production, as long as you plant the right kind.

I'm jelly of your move to the country. I grew up in the middle of nowhere, and living on the edge of even a "small" town is agonizing for me. My world is a noisy, cramped little fishbowl. I occasionally remind my husband that it might not be the worst thing to just a buy a piece of undeveloped land in a decently rural area and begin our homestead the old-fashioned way in a sturdy tent or a rustic cabin. I had a childhood that taught me how to thrive in primitive living situations... and an adulthood that makes me think it would be well worth doing! Would be an easy trade for me, to give up all of the "convenience" for the kind of hard work that could earn me back the peace and quiet that I was born into. My husband is not yet sold on that. ;) Sorry for rambling - but that's a wonderful move! Congrats, and may your garden flourish. <3
 

Luna Novem

Woodpecker
Woman
We've done a few things a few different summers. Last summer we did tomatoes, basil, and green pepper. My husband always helps in the beginning with the setup and then it's my responsibility to keep things watered, although he also likes to keep doing pruning. I'd love to do more. In the past I have done lettuce, cilantro, cucumbers, and peas.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
kitty Tantrum, strawberries?? You didn’t grow up in Florida in Plant City did you? I spent a lot of my growing up years in Zephyrhills, Fl., at my aunt’s house. They used to farm bell peppers. To this day the smell of a bell pepper brings me back to helping them sort the peppers. The ones we buy in stores were culls they’d sell on clearance or even throw away.

I grieved leaving the city, but now that we are here I love it.

And nothing beats a homegrown tomato!! My grandmother, who we lived with on her land, always had a garden when I was a kid. Many was the afternoon I’d grab the salt shaker, pick a couple of sun warmed tomatoes, and sit by the pond eating them like apples.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
You didn’t grow up in Florida in Plant City did you?
Other coast... my agricultural adventures have been divvied up between (western) WA and CA! :blush:

My mom and stepdad have a small farm in CA. Nothing quite compares in all my my gardening memories, to picking warm, perfectly ripe heirloom tomatoes in the dry, sun-drenched fields. Where just the slight rustling of the leaves would send that tomato-plant smell exploding into the air everywhere around. I love that smell! It's not quite the same here in the upper left corner. We get all the rain, though!
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Er, just wanted to say I live states away from Florida now. I know we aren’t supposed to reveal current personal information.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
I don't think general regions or states are specific enough to be identifying info (mods plz correct if wrong).

I personally worry a lot less that someone might be able to hunt me down based on revealing which state(s) I live(d) in, along with whatever little stories I tell... than I do about Big Tech being able to locate me within seconds, anywhere, from some satellite surveillance feed based on AI visual recognition of clothing that I'm wearing that was purchased on (tracked through) Amazon. :hmm:
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
I don't think general regions or states are specific enough to be identifying info (mods plz correct if wrong).

I personally worry a lot less that someone might be able to hunt me down based on revealing which state(s) I live(d) in, along with whatever little stories I tell... than I do about Big Tech being able to locate me within seconds, anywhere, from some satellite surveillance feed based on AI visual recognition of clothing that I'm wearing that was purchased on (tracked through) Amazon. :hmm:


Eek. That sounds like it could be its own whole thread.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I don't think general regions or states are specific enough to be identifying info (mods plz correct if wrong).

I personally worry a lot less that someone might be able to hunt me down based on revealing which state(s) I live(d) in, along with whatever little stories I tell... than I do about Big Tech being able to locate me within seconds, anywhere, from some satellite surveillance feed based on AI visual recognition of clothing that I'm wearing that was purchased on (tracked through) Amazon. :hmm:

I don’t think so either, but I’m not sure. It’s probably a rule to weed out a certain type. I have concerns about both. As an introvert I don’t want any high school friends finding me. It happened once, she drove me nuts calling all the time and being a bore, so I’m paranoid. Into every introverts’ life a bore or several must fall.
 

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
During the winter we start from seeds with an Areogarden.
Beets, tomatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, and basil work out great, cilantro is difficult to grow for our household.
If anyone has a great tip for cilantro please share.

We too had tomatoes (Cherry - seeded themselves) that were still on the vine ready for picking up until our first frost in December.
Odd year. The herbs are still hanging on in the beds, but with solar modification in our area light has been limited.

Would like to learn more about raised beds vs stock tank growing. Or any experience.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
During the winter we start from seeds with an Areogarden.
Beets, tomatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, and basil work out great, cilantro is difficult to grow for our household.
If anyone has a great tip for cilantro please share.

We too had tomatoes (Cherry - seeded themselves) that were still on the vine ready for picking up until our first frost in December.
Odd year. The herbs are still hanging on in the beds, but with solar modification in our area light has been limited.

Would like to learn more about raised beds vs stock tank growing. Or any experience.

I just learned cilantro prefers cool weather and suffers in hot weather. I’m going to try some early this spring. I’m also researching grow bags. I think I’ll try a combination of in-ground and grow bags before I commit money and time building and filling raised beds. I’m going to experiment by growing the same variety in a grow bag and the ground to see which does better.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
How ironic - @Gabi St just posted on recipes for Italian ideas and Cardoons was second on the list.


Thanks for pointing this out. What a coincidence! The cardoons are difficult to track down where I live now, but I have such nostalgic family memories of this recipe. They are a winter vegetable and my Italian grandfather used to fry them at Christmastime. I called around this year and finally found a local produce shop that can special order a 5 lb shipment to me from their supplier. I plan to share with my parents and my brother (a chef). I’ll post my results here!
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I’ll admit, I’m pretty envious of you too, Lamkins! My husband and I hope to move to somewhere much more rural where we can have space to pursue our interests and hobbies.

We don’t currently have a vegetable garden but have been considering getting a few cement planter corner blocks to make our own like this:
1609549988006.png

We did plant some citrus trees and hardy herbs a few years ago, though. Our lavender and rosemary have grown into behemoths and grow faster than we can use them up. They grow like weeds here. We, also, finally got our first fruit from our mandarin and Meyer lemon! One mandarin and two lemons (haven’t picked any lemons yet as they’re not ready).
 
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Hell_Is_Like_Newark

Kingfisher
Gold Member
A few years ago I setup a hydroponic garden on my flat roof as I have no yard. Basically a demonstration on how engineers garden. The whole project got set aside after my son was born due to the financial and time constraints he brought with him. Hopefully I will get it up and running again this summer.
 

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Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
That Urban Homestead project is pretty cool! Although a setup like that seems unrealistic for most people. I always wonder with projects like this that get a ton of media attention, how much of their "sustainability" in terms of continued existence comes from the added angle of monetization through secondary and tertiary avenues rather than actual base-level PRODUCTION of things.

I tried to read through the website a bit to see if I could answer that question for myself, but the website design is so god-awful/ADHD with things moving around while I try to scroll and read, I couldn't stand to look at it for more than a few moments. :confused:
 
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