Does anyone vegetable garden?

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Found this two years ago, but was not interested in planting greens at the time.

This is a creative idea for those with little space, or interested in raised beds for cheap. Either building the frames or using wrought iron tables.
The tables need to allow water to drain through because the bags have holes in the bottom.

how-to-grow-vegetables-in-garden-soil-bags-square.jpg
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
My winter garden is lots of garlic, about 20 beets and 10 kale.

I am especially excited about the garlic. Two years ago there was an issue with Chinese garlic and farmers around here planted a massive amount of Russian and Spanish. Its still a bit pricey but now people are exposed to just how good proper garlic is compared to the bland Chinese grown. Neighbors grew 300 pounds and sold out quick for $12/lbs!

I would like to get about 20 asparagus in this year. I will buy the crowns to save time.

This year we will do lots of carrots, potatoes, tomatoes again. I want to try chives again, but probably a different variety.

I enjoy peas off the plants, but no one really likes them shelled and cooked. So maybe not this year.

Our beans took a while to get going but never really ended up with more than a couple pounds. Will try again, maybe in a different bed.

The farm next to us has a blueberry patch that is neglected, so I might grab a couple small bushed from them and transplant them.

Our blackberries are insane. We take 50 or more pounds each year off them. Most go straight into bowls of cream and are eaten right there by the kids as they lick their wounds from the harvest.
 
I just learned cilantro prefers cool weather and suffers in hot weather. I’m going to try some early this spring. I’m also researching grow bags. I think I’ll try a combination of in-ground and grow bags before I commit money and time building and filling raised beds. I’m going to experiment by growing the same variety in a grow bag and the ground to see which does better.

Exactly, I grew cilantro from seeds starting in april last year and it's still going strong even with sub zero temperatures.
I was amazed as I initially thought it will die in winter.
I've learned that it will eventually bloom next spring, you can collect the seeds and keep the cycle going.
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Exactly, I grew cilantro from seeds starting in april last year and it's still going strong even with sub zero temperatures.
I was amazed as I initially thought it will die in winter.
I've learned that it will eventually bloom next spring, you can collect the seeds and keep the cycle going.

Would you be so kind to share how you germinated the seeds? Did you just plant in soil or did you force germination through a different method, such as, wet paper towel? I was able to take a ginger root and grow a plant using the wet paper towel method.

My winter garden is lots of garlic, about 20 beets and 10 kale.

I would like to get about 20 asparagus in this year. I will buy the crowns to save time.

This year we will do lots of carrots, potatoes, tomatoes again. I want to try chives again, but probably a different variety.

How low do your temperatures drop during the winter to allow garlic, beets, and kale to survive still? Do you cover the beds?
You must have land to grow.

We have clay in our area so we need to have raised beds to grow carrots, garlic, and potatoes. We tried carrots once and they ended up stubby. We have pine trees and blueberries both thrive in acidic soil, and make great growing companions. Also if one ever wants blue hydrangeas the soil has to be acidic.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Would you be so kind to share how you germinated the seeds? Did you just plant in soil or did you force germination through a different method, such as, wet paper towel? I was able to take a ginger root and grow a plant using the wet paper towel method.



How low do your temperatures drop during the winter to allow garlic, beets, and kale to survive still? Do you cover the beds?
You must have land to grow.

We have clay in our area so we need to have raised beds to grow carrots, garlic, and potatoes. We tried carrots once and they ended up stubby. We have pine trees and blueberries both thrive in acidic soil, and make great growing companions. Also if one ever wants blue hydrangeas the soil has to be acidic.
I am on Canada's west coast, so winter is usually from about 3c overnight up to about 7c day. We get about 3 weeks below 0c but also get about 3 weeks above 15c. Its a pretty lush environment. I use straw to cover the garden in winter, but only because there is so much of it in my area from the hay farmers.

Yeah our carrots come out pretty stubby as well! I am a pretty cheap gardener so I use mud from our dykes as soil and have never tested ph or anything, so the bed of our garden is pretty hard. I really need to do a raised bed this year though. We thinned a grove so we have a bunch of brush and timber we can use to fill it up some and then just get a yard or two of soil from the guys down the road.
 
Would you be so kind to share how you germinated the seeds? Did you just plant in soil or did you force germination through a different method, such as, wet paper towel? I was able to take a ginger root and grow a plant using the wet paper towel method.



How low do your temperatures drop during the winter to allow garlic, beets, and kale to survive still? Do you cover the beds?
You must have land to grow.

We have clay in our area so we need to have raised beds to grow carrots, garlic, and potatoes. We tried carrots once and they ended up stubby. We have pine trees and blueberries both thrive in acidic soil, and make great growing companions. Also if one ever wants blue hydrangeas the soil has to be acidic.

No problem, I will take a picture of it tomorrow and explain what I've done in details.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I just learned cilantro prefers cool weather and suffers in hot weather.
Basil doesn’t do well in hot weather either from my experience. It does need lots of sunlight but high heat will stress the plant and make it bloom. Yeah, they grow “well” in heat but the leaves become pretty useless.

I planted a few basil plants at the end of summer last year and they did really well through winter and spring but as soon as we got our first heat wave they all sprouted bud stalks. Even after giving them a good prune and diligently clipping the new buds off everyday, the leaves had lost all their flavor and aroma, and the plants became scraggly.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Found this two years ago, but was not interested in planting greens at the time.

This is a creative idea for those with little space, or interested in raised beds for cheap. Either building the frames or using wrought iron tables.
The tables need to allow water to drain through because the bags have holes in the bottom.

View attachment 28199

I did this one year. I think if I’d used the right soil and watered consistently it would’ve been a success.

Regarding carrots, there are varieties that grow short and stubby. They’re good for clay or rocky soil. And they’re cute!

Cilantro—I had no idea it’d grow in winter. I’ll have to try that.

Lastly, my lettuce seeds have sprouted!! I’m growing some in a window in a couple of small pots to have salad makings.

Wait, I’m not finished. I’m trying out this mini romaine this year. Aren’t they adorable?!
1C87DF54-0269-4A35-AFEC-4D33D27724D2.jpeg
 
Last edited:

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Regarding carrots, there are varieties that grow short and stubby. They’re good for clay or rocky soil. And they’re cute!
Wait, I’m not finished. I’m trying out this mini romaine this year. Aren’t they adorable?!

Oh they are so adorable. But more so look good to consume. Must be special seeds - have not seen in our stores but will be on the lookout.
 
Last edited:

Mrs.DanielH

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
I get the catalogs for Baker Creek Seeds and Seed Savers Exchange (more organic and heirlooms). It's fun for read through and learn about different plants, but also "window" shopping because I'm realistically not going to grow every variety. It takes a lot of self control not to order every single seed I'm interested in lol
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I get the catalogs for Baker Creek Seeds and Seed Savers Exchange (more organic and heirlooms). It's fun for read through and learn about different plants, but also "window" shopping because I'm realistically not going to grow every variety. It takes a lot of self control not to order every single seed I'm interested in lol

isn’t that the truth! I trimmed down my order a lot and still think I got too much.
 
Would you be so kind to share how you germinated the seeds? Did you just plant in soil or did you force germination through a different method, such as, wet paper towel? I was able to take a ginger root and grow a plant using the wet paper towel method.



How low do your temperatures drop during the winter to allow garlic, beets, and kale to survive still? Do you cover the beds?
You must have land to grow.

We have clay in our area so we need to have raised beds to grow carrots, garlic, and potatoes. We tried carrots once and they ended up stubby. We have pine trees and blueberries both thrive in acidic soil, and make great growing companions. Also if one ever wants blue hydrangeas the soil has to be acidic.

At that time I lived in an apartment so I used a rectangular flower pots that I put on the balcony.

I don't know if it's the right name for it, so here's a link to show you what I used:
https://www.google.com/search?q=jar...-uQlZAD&bih=697&biw=1280#imgrc=-n_KQ0Z2oZrW0M

So first you put a bed of gravel at the bottom, just enough that you don't see the bottom of the pot. Just don't put too much. This is an important process, if you don't do that the soil will clog the holes at the bottom of the pot and the excess water will have no way to evacuate.

Then after that you put your soil. I do half soil taken for a fertile ground and half potting soil.

I then put the seeds, cover it with more potting soil and water it.

If you don't use a pot, I don't know if it's better to grow seedlings first and then put it in soil later or directly sowing the seeds in your soil, or as you mentionned the paper towel method.

It will be nice to try all different methods and see what works best.
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Exactly, I grew cilantro from seeds starting in april last year and it's still going strong even with sub zero temperatures.
I was amazed as I initially thought it will die in winter.
I've learned that it will eventually bloom next spring, you can collect the seeds and keep the cycle going.

An update - planted cilantro/coriander - half of the packet in peat and the other half wrapped in a wet napkin. Both were under an AEROGarden light for 12-15 hours a day.

The seeds in the napkins germinated faster than the seeds planted in peat - within a full day.

Unfortunately, the eucalyptus seeds are too fussy and have not seen any sprouts.
 

dragonfire00

Robin
Woman
Sadly I haven't gardened before...was raised in cities and my parents didn't care. I want to start growing food as I'm worried about a future shortage due to Biden policies, but I don't have a large backyard and live in a desert. What are the best options? I'm thinking squash/broccoli/edamame might be the most useful. Any advice?
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Sadly I haven't gardened before...was raised in cities and my parents didn't care. I want to start growing food as I'm worried about a future shortage due to Biden policies, but I don't have a large backyard and live in a desert. What are the best options? I'm thinking squash/broccoli/edamame might be the most useful. Any advice?

I’d do an online search about desert gardening. I have no experience. However, broccoli is a cool weather crop. I equate desert with heat, so maybe it could be a winter crop. Squash (zucchini especially), pole beans, and cucumbers are about the easiest in my opinion and all love a long warm growing season.
 

MBell

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox
Gardening is such a beautiful experience. My grandmother had a huge garden, and we used to harvest cucumbers and tomatoes to eat right from the patch. It was such as privilege to eat food that you nurture from seed to plate, and I am hoping to someday have a garden of my own!
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Gardening is such a beautiful experience. My grandmother had a huge garden, and we used to harvest cucumbers and tomatoes to eat right from the patch. It was such as privilege to eat food that you nurture from seed to plate, and I am hoping to someday have a garden of my own!

That is a really nice memory about your grandma that you shared. You can have a little kitchen garden for growing herbs and greens, even tomatoes. We have greens, dill, thye, and basil. Basil is nice because you can cut the stems of basil and root by placing in water, so they are great with the garden kitchen system. Cucumber plants are also known to make great houseplants.
 

MBell

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox
That is a really nice memory about your grandma that you shared. You can have a little kitchen garden for growing herbs and greens, even tomatoes. We have greens, dill, thye, and basil. Basil is nice because you can cut the stems of basil and root by placing in water, so they are great with the garden kitchen system. Cucumber plants are also known to make great houseplants.
Thanks for the advice! It's great to know that you can start small and enjoy the benefit of a personal garden. I appreciate the tips about how specific plants work well as houseplants.
 
Top