Does anyone vegetable garden?

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
My husband and I finally finished building our raised garden bed! We took out an old rose garden (about 6 large plants) from the previous owners and set up it up there. We planted Roma’s, cherry tomatoes, Carmello tomatoes, zucchini, jalapeño, red bell pepper, green bell pepper, and a basil. I know the basil will have to be removed eventually but then we’ll plant a new one in the fall. We’re pretty excited to see how these babies will grow :blush:

On a side note: I now hate, hate, rose bushes. What a nightmare it was removing those.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I’m excited to announce I have lettuce and tomato seeds sprouting in my closet seed starting area. My hubby decided we may be looking at possible food shortages one day so made me order more lettuce. We are now in possession of 1,750 lettuce seeds, lol. He laughed too. Since lettuce is a cool weather crop I’m going to try growing it all summer indoors under lights. I’d love to have fresh lettuce available year round.

A couple of types I’m excited to try are mini buttercrunch types. One is about tennis ball size and the other softball, which is pretty close to regular buttercrunch size.
 
Season just started for us. This year we have a few test beds for things we haven't ever tried, like corn. However, we have a bunch of beds that we're doing companion planting of only crops that are known to do well in our area. Hoping to max out the yields.

Tomato (variety native to our area)
Black eyed peas
Okra
Sweet potato
Cucumber
Peppers
Eggplant
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Today I thin! I’m really amazed by the growth. This pic is of several varieties and colors of tomatoes and 3 lettuce varieties. I also got smart and used foam cups that I wrote on the variety and date started with a sharpie. Tom R Carbon 3-2 is tomato, red, name of variety is Carbon, started March 2. My mom only likes red tomatoes, so I had to keep track of the colors. Im growing red, green, yellow, orange, and a gorgeous multi-colored cherry for us.

Pic of the whole setup below.

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messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Per a conversation with @Lamkins I was given the following statement:

"As the author of this gardening thread I hereby officially invite your bulbs to the veggie section." :blush:

This is the first time growing bulbs like this in the house during Spring. Seems to work, as opposed to planting outside - where there is low bloom productivity. It started with Freesias because of fragrance.

Bulbs are soaked in warm water for 24 hours. Change the water daily until they sprout - then plant them in a coconut mixture, or keep in water with rocks. Place in an area with sunlight, or by a kitchen indoor gardening light. I used old pots around the house instead of purchasing the recommended terracotta pots.


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It is an inspiration during our cold winters, and a nice learning exercise for our child.
 
Does anyone have a solution for tomato hornworms that doesn’t involve pesticides? They multiply faster than I can pick them off and I swear they actually enjoy being sprayed with neem oil...
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Does anyone have a solution for tomato hornworms that doesn’t involve pesticides? They multiply faster than I can pick them off and I swear they actually enjoy being sprayed with neem oil...

We had one bugger by our tomato plants too in the summer - hanging out on the sunflowers. I noticed a parasitic egg attached and had to look it up. The larva were wasps.

Have you tried introducing bird feeders into the garden and attracting Cardinals with black oil sunflower, saffsa flower, or cracked corn? Downy woodpeckers are said to eat hornworms too. We only had one hornworm last year in our garden, maybe it was the birds?

Maybe try a birdbath and a few feeders with a selection of bird seeds to attract Cardinals, Woodpeckers, Blue Birds, and there is one more... can not remember. Chickens will also eat them!
 
We had one bugger by our tomato plants too in the summer - hanging out on the sunflowers. I noticed a parasitic egg attached and had to look it up. The larva were wasps.
Have you tried introducing bird feeders into the garden and attracting Cardinals with black oil sunflower, saffsa flower, or cracked corn? Downy woodpeckers are said to eat hornworms too. We only had one hornworm last year in our garden, maybe it was the birds?

Maybe try a birdbath and a few feeders with a selection of bird seeds to attract Cardinals, Woodpeckers, Blue Birds, and there is one more... can not remember. Chickens will also eat them!
Thanks for the tips. I think I’ll relocate my bird feeder closer to the garden for starters. I’m going to try to get chickens restarted again this year so hopefully they can help.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Per a conversation with @Lamkins I was given the following statement:



This is the first time growing bulbs like this in the house during Spring. Seems to work, as opposed to planting outside - where there is low bloom productivity. It started with Freesias because of fragrance.

Bulbs are soaked in warm water for 24 hours. Change the water daily until they sprout - then plant them in a coconut mixture, or keep in water with rocks. Place in an area with sunlight, or by a kitchen indoor gardening light. I used old pots around the house instead of purchasing the recommended terracotta pots.


View attachment 29793

It is an inspiration during our cold winters, and a nice learning exercise for our child.

Wow!! Please share bloom pics! I wish we had smell-o-vision too.....


I also had no idea birds and chickens ate those awful hornworms. Good to know. I get the heebie jeebies looking at them, so I guess I’ll pay my mom a dollar a worm to pluck them off, lol.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Not vegetable's but my son and I cut about 100 daffodils this past week. There are a lot of March birthdays and my mom is staying with us for a couple weeks so he was in full spoil the ladies mode. It was great.

We also dug up some big clumps and moved them to better locations (near his treehouse) for ease of cutting next spring. We moved them earlier than suggested but they seem to be doing good.

Another fun thing we did was take some old cordwood logs that were rotting in the grove and dig into them with an auger bit to hollow them out. Then we filled them with dirt and planted some wildflower seeds and they are at the start of the trail into his little treehouse grove. We'll see how that goes.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Here is my garden we got finished today. I can hardly walk I’m so stiff. I was hoping it’d be a lot cuter with wooden posts, but our ground is so rocky they were impossible to sink so we had to use green t-posts. I have another raised bed I’ll be planting cow peas in, but it’s not set up yet. In this one are jalapeños, kale, cabbage, eggplant, lettuce, beets, and a couple things I’m forgetting. I’m putting zinnia seed in tomorrow to attract pollinators. Between the t-posts are tomatoes, pole beans, and cucumbers along with some cardinal vine to pretty it up. I’ll be adding cantaloupe too. I’ve got some old bales of straw I’ll be spreading to help block weeds and make it prettier. Pay no attention to the tarp drying in the sun. It’s not part of the garden.

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Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
I still haven't done anything. Zip, zero, nada. I'm going to have to start watering soon if I don't want what's out there to die.

I told my husband that I've been hard at work in the garden every day for weeks, and that it is already producing more crops per planted square foot than any other garden in history.

I have decided to call it the Joe Biden Victory Garden.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I helped my son put in his potatoes this weekend. We tripled his little plot from last year and it's his forest garden at his treehouse, so we are not really expecting much, but last year his potatoes took surprisingly well and he got about 10 pounds. He was excited so I helped hoe a larger spot and he dropped in the seed potatoes.

The wildflowers we planted in the tree stumps are doing good as well! He built his first solo wood project and made a bird house and put it up. His little grove is actually looking pretty great right now.

We transplanted some onions from inside to a raised bed and also filled in some gaps in the large garden bed with them. We still have about 40 onion seedlings and are out of space so they might end up in the forest too.

Our neighbor's daughter brought over some raspberry plants they cut from their garden. We started clearing a 2' x 8' section along a south facing wall of the building that we will trellis and let the canes climb the hot wall. Hopefully we can finish that up next weekend so we can get some raspberries this summer!

I have managed to tame back some of the invasive blackberries over near the treehouse grove and the new shoots are exploding, so the hope is we can beat them back, while still enjoying their fruits. They are brutal species. Last spring when we were clearing the grove we hacking out a massive amount of bushes, and in the process found a cherry tree pinned to the ground nearly dead. We de tangled it and pounded in a support and within a week it got one fragrant little cherry blossom. This year it blossomed about 20 beautiful flowers. The massive kink in the trunk is a nice reminder that nature never gives up and always finds a way. It seems to be 5x healthier this year than the cherry tree next to it.
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Spring has passed here and we’re getting ready for the summer heat in a month (probably less actually lol). Our little citrus trees (lime, Meyer lemon, and mandarin orange) have their little tiny fruits growing, barely the size of a pea right now. Our tomatoes and zucchini have exploded. The red bell pepper plant is about two feet tall now with about five peppers just starting to grow.

Here is a picture of our first itty bitty Carmello tomato growing (so cute :blush:):
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My daughter planted her own little garden as well of tomatoes and Brussel sprouts. I didn’t think they would do as well as they have. She planted these all as seeds outdoors. One of her brussel sprout plants:
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TexasJenn

Woodpecker
Woman
In the past I've grown cucumbers (and made homemade pickles, delicious), lettuce, onions, okra, tomatoes, strawberries, and peppers. I'm not doing any vegetables this year, but do have some pretty flowers and a decent herb garden with basil, sage, rosemary, cilantro, thyme, oregano, spearmint, and cilantro. I've been cooking with my fresh herbs regularly and they're so tasty. My peach tree has produced a few peaches for the first time this year, yay! And the figs on the tree are coming in, too.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I love hearing about everyone’s gardening adventures. Even your non-adventures, KittyTantrum, lol.

Laner and Starlight, I love that your kids are gardening. I learned to love to grow things from my grandmother. Id gather acorns and sprout baby oaks in my windowsill. Cutey tomato too!

Starlight, I’m envious of your citrus. My aunt always had citrus trees, and the smell of the blossoms.....that’s what heaven will smell like, you know! My mom has a clematis that smells remarkably like orange blossoms.

TexasJen, I make homemade pickles too. My aunt and I used to get together and do big batches. These days I just do refrigerator pickles.

And now I’m off the finish up my garden planting and get my porch urn planters planted. Not sure how I’m going to keep the cats from sitting on them. They love nothing better than a fresh pot of flowers to lounge on. :sneaky:
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
In the past I've grown cucumbers (and made homemade pickles, delicious), lettuce, onions, okra, tomatoes, strawberries, and peppers. I'm not doing any vegetables this year, but do have some pretty flowers and a decent herb garden with basil, sage, rosemary, cilantro, thyme, oregano, spearmint, and cilantro. I've been cooking with my fresh herbs regularly and they're so tasty. My peach tree has produced a few peaches for the first time this year, yay! And the figs on the tree are coming in, too.

Any advice on what to grow with the cucumbers to add to the pickles?

We have A LOT of garlic growing and will use that. Also thinking of growing some dill. All my experience with pickling was the week or so when I was a kid that I would get on the school bus each morning smelling like a pickle factory.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
Any advice on what to grow with the cucumbers to add to the pickles?

We have A LOT of garlic growing and will use that. Also thinking of growing some dill. All my experience with pickling was the week or so when I was a kid that I would get on the school bus each morning smelling like a pickle factory.
My dad has always made gigantic batches of pickles every year. I remember the first day or so, I enjoyed the smell of the brine... and then it would just get oppressive after that.

Garlic and dill are my favorites for pickling cucumbers. When I was a kid I'd eat the chunks of garlic and nibble on the dill after the pickles were gone. My mom started slipping things like sliced carrots and bell peppers in with her pickles, and eventually started doing full jars of just pickled peppers, carrots, onions, green beans, etc. (and combinations thereof). Those are pretty tasty, too.

My neighbor and I both tried growing dill for pickling last year, but it stayed small and soft and stunted and never got big and sturdy and mature like what you want for pickling. We were both pretty perplexed. Kind of like how all the squash plants got eaten by mold faster than they could mature.

I kinda feel like there's something about the spot where we live that makes it kind of a catch-all for nasty things in the air/water, partly because of where we're situated in the valley, and also because it's a basically a little patch of dirt that is completely surrounded by pavement and ongoing development. I don't want to give up on gardening entirely, but will probably plant more flowers this year and skip some of the vegetables that did poorly.
 
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