Eating bugs is good for you and will save the environment

Roosh

Cardinal
There has been a rash of articles lately that are encouraging bug eating. They claim that bugs are nutritious and will help save the planet. Here's one from CNN:

On a morning in the not-too-distant future, you might toast bread made with cricket flour, drink a protein smoothie made from locust powder, and eat scrambled eggs (made extra-creamy with the fat from mopane caterpillars) with a side of mealworm bacon.

That meal will give you four times the iron, more than three times the protein and more key vitamins and minerals than the bread, smoothie, eggs and bacon you eat today -- all while saving the planet.

No way you'll eat bugs, you say?

Well, sorry to break this to you, but if you eat chocolate, pizza and spaghetti, you are already eating insects -- and worse.

Bugs, rodent hair and poop: How much is legally allowed in the food you eat every day?

The US Food and Drug Administration allows 30 or more insect parts and some rodent hair in every bar of chocolate; nearly two maggots in a 16 ounce can of tomatoes or pizza sauce; and up to 450 insect parts and nine rodent hairs in every 16 ounce box of spaghetti.

There's just no way to get rid of all the creatures that might hitch a ride along the food processing chain, so the FDA has to allow what they call "food defects," which you eat without knowing. They are in many of our foods -- even peanut butter and jelly.

So why not eat bugs on purpose and simultaneously fight climate change?

Bugs are really good for you

Your friends and neighbors are already munching on insects. According to a report by Global Market Insights, the US edible insect market topped $55 million in 2017 and is expected to grow to nearly $80 million by 2024.
Europe's on track to do the same, while Asia Pacific nations are expected to eat $270 million worth of insects by the quarter of the century.

A growing demand for high quality protein, along with a movement toward sustainability and against processed foods, are a few of the reasons behind the growing popularity.

Here's another explanation: Bugs are very good for you.

Many countries and traditions have known this for decades, even centuries. According to a 2013 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), at least 2 billion people worldwide eat bugs every day.

Worms served like French fries

"I've eaten bugs in many countries: termites, scorpions, beetle larvae, grasshoppers, silkworms. All very common," said entomologist Jeff Tomberlin, who directs the forensic and investigative sciences program at Texas A&M University.

"I had beetle larva that was incorporated into a quiche. I've had bamboo worms that were fried like French fries," he said. "I've had termites that were smoked and served as an appetizer, just like peanuts.

"As for the taste, it's sort of a nutty popcorn flavor," Tomberlin said. "The buttery flavor would be the fat of the insect and the nuttiness would be the chitin, or the exoskeleton."

The most commonly eaten insect groups globally, according to the FAO, are ants; beetles; bees; caterpillars; cicadas; crickets; dragonflies; flies; grasshoppers; leaf bugs; locusts; scale insects; termites; and wasps.

But there's lots more to choose from. More than 2,100 edible insects have been recorded in the world, according to Wageningen University and Research in the Netherlands.

And many of those are packed with good-for-you vitamins, minerals, fat and protein. In fact, insects are often considered delicacies.

Queen termites, for example, are so nutritionally dense that they are fed to undernourished children in Uganda and Zambia.


Consider those mealworms you had instead of bacon at our imaginary breakfast. They have higher unsaturated omega-
3 levels than fish, as well as the same protein, vitamin and mineral content.

The cricket protein in the toast you hypothetically enjoyed is said to be a "complete protein" just like fish, meat, dairy and eggs. Complete proteins contain all nine essential amino acids needed to build and repair protein tissues in the body. We don't naturally make those essential amino acids, so we must get them through our diet.

In addition, each insect delivers an enormous punch of protein for its size.

Take the mopane caterpillar, one of the most highly prized and devoured insects in the world. One mopane worm, as they are called, provides between 48% to 61% of protein, and is a source of calcium, zinc and iron.

A dish of Mopani worms, imported from Zimbabwe.

Then there's the fat content: 16% to 20% of the mopane worm is fat, of which 40% is essential fatty acids. The fat can add a creaminess to recipes (remember your future breakfast eggs?).

Bugs are good for the planet

And then there's the biggest selling point: Devouring bugs instead of methane-producing livestock is an easy, excellent way to deliver quality nutrition to the masses of humanity while helping the environment.

95% of tested baby foods in the US contain toxic metals, report says

But it's not just protecting the ozone. Bugs don't use much water (there's a global water crisis). They can be grown on organic waste (poo-poo platter anyone?). And they can be grown vertically, in a small amount of space.

That last bit is huge: According to the FAO, over a fourth of the world's land is used for grazing livestock. Another third of the earth is dedicated to growing crops that will be eaten by livestock.

Just think of it: Bugs can be grown in small cages nested inside insect skyscrapers.

If that is huge, this next fact is gargantuan: Because they are cold-blooded and need less energy to stay warm, bugs need much less food than animals.

Crickets, for example, need 12 times less feed than cattle, four times less than sheep, and half the feed needed by pigs and broiler chickens to produce the same amount of protein, according to the FAO.

"If you look at the production of a pound of beef, you're looking at a conversion rate of about 20 to 1 -- 20 pounds of feed to produce one pound of meat," Tomberlin said. "If you look at insects, you're looking at about 2 to 1 ratio. So it's a much more effective conversion rate."

If that isn't enough, there's yet another plus: the fast life-cycle of insects.

This startup is saving crops by making 'super bees'

"While you may feed an animal for six weeks to ready it for market, during that same period you (could) have multiple generations of insects," Tomberlin said. "Add that to the fact that you can raise them in such little space, on so little feed, and you've got three ways in which insects are superior food products than livestock."

The 2019 population estimate from the United Nations says that our world will grow from 7.7 billion now to 9.7 billion in 2050.

Consider the devastating effects of climate change, overfishing, water shortages and a reduced productivity of crop-growing fields, and it's easy to see how insects will soon be the protein of the future.

Mopane worm hummus, anyone?
https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/25/heal..._source=twCNN&utm_term=link&utm_medium=social

They are also trying to sell cockroach milk...

An international team of scientists sequenced a protein crystal located in the midgut of cockroaches in 2016. The reason?

It's more than four times as nutritious as cow's milk and the researchers think it could be the key to feeding our growing population in the future.

Although most cockroaches don't actually produce milk, Diploptera punctate, which is the only known cockroach to give birth to live young, has been shown to pump out a type of 'milk' containing protein crystals to feed its babies.

The fact that an insect produces milk is pretty fascinating – but what fascinated researchers is the fact that a single one of these protein crystals contains more than three times the amount of energy found in an equivalent amount of buffalo milk (which is also higher in calories than regular cow's milk).

Clearly milking a cockroach isn't the most feasible option, so an international team of scientists headed by researchers from the Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in India decided to sequence the genes responsible for producing the milk protein crystals to see if they could somehow replicate them in the lab.

"The crystals are like a complete food - they have proteins, fats and sugars. If you look into the protein sequences, they have all the essential amino acids," said Sanchari Banerjee, one of the team, in an interview with the Times of India back in 2016.

Not only is the milk a dense source of calories and nutrients, it's also time released.

As the protein in the milk is digested, the crystal releases more protein at an equivalent rate to continue the digestion.

"It's time-released food," said Subramanian Ramaswamy, who led the project.

"If you need food that is calorifically high, that is time released and food that is complete. This is it."

It's important to point out that this dense protein source is definitely never going to be for those trying to lose weight, and probably isn't even required for most western diets, where we are already eating too many calories per day.

But for those who struggle to get the amount of calories required per day, this could be a quick and easy way to get calories and nutrients.

"They're very stable. They can be a fantastic protein supplement," said Ramaswamy.

Now the researchers have the sequence, they are hoping to get yeast to produce the crystal in much larger quantities - making it slightly more efficient (and less gross) than extracting crystals from cockroach's guts.

Who needs kale and quinoa when you have cockroach milk supplements?

…Yeah, we aren't 100 percent convinced either. But if it helps alleviate the food shortages we'll have to deal with this generation, we'll take it.
https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-think-we-should-start-drinking-cockroach-milk-superfood

 

VNvet

Kingfisher
The CNN piece reads more like a sales pitch than news. Here's a brief breakdown on media brainwashing at work.

On a morning in the not-too-distant future, you might toast bread made with cricket flour, drink a protein smoothie made from locust powder, and eat scrambled eggs (made extra-creamy with the fat from mopane caterpillars) with a side of mealworm bacon.
This is the predictive programming part. They're seeding the idea of eating bugs in your mind.

No way you'll eat bugs, you say?

Well, sorry to break this to you, but if you eat chocolate, pizza and spaghetti, you are already eating insects -- and worse.
Good rebuttal to the most obvious objection.

Your friends and neighbors are already munching on insects. According to a report by Global Market Insights, the US edible insect market topped $55 million in 2017 and is expected to grow to nearly $80 million by 2024.
Many countries and traditions have known this for decades, even centuries. According to a 2013 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), at least 2 billion people worldwide eat bugs every day.

Everyone else is doing it, so you may as well do it. This type of sales pitch works EXTREMELY well.

"I've eaten bugs in many countries: termites, scorpions, beetle larvae, grasshoppers, silkworms. All very common," said entomologist Jeff Tomberlin, who directs the forensic and investigative sciences program at Texas A&M University.
An appeal to authority.

And then there's the biggest selling point: Devouring bugs instead of methane-producing livestock is an easy, excellent way to deliver quality nutrition to the masses of humanity while helping the environment.
If it's the biggest selling point, then why is it the last selling point that you mention?

Doesn't make much sense to me.

***

I'm wondering what the endgame with promoting bug eating to the NPCs is?

My guess is that the lack of nutrients make people weak and stupid, which makes them unable to resist a tyrannical government. But I'm not sure.
 
I think at this point they’re just pushing to see how far they can go, trying to humiliate the masses to the greatest possible extent. Remember that they are not simply wrong, they are overtly malicious and take pleasure in hurting the people they think of as their slaves and subjects.
 
I've had muffins made out of cricket flour. It wasn't half bad.

For $10 for a quarter-pound, it ain't cheap on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Cricket-powder-made-100-22/dp/B00OMCTODQ

I don't suspect we're going to see it overtaking wheat-based flour any time soon on strictly a cost basis.

In fact, with all the Monsanto GMO/Roundup sprayed/chemically bleached wheat that is used to produce most flour, it wouldn't surprise me if cricket flour would be healthier than the stuff that most commercial wheat flour farms turn out. Now, that still doesn't reduce the ick factor of eating bugs, but I wouldn't dismiss it out of hand.
 

Beyond Borders

Peacock
Gold Member
Used to eat bugs all the time in Cambodia and Thailand while out drinking with local buddies in off-the-track spots. The vendors come by with pushcarts and a varied selection - you order a bag and eat them like popcorn at the table. Some are actually pretty good if cooked crispy and tossed with some good spice.

At one Cambodian friend's house we'd sit out on the front doorstop drinking big bottles of Angkor. A small light set out that brought only a particular type of chunky moth flying down from the sky (and they really swarmed all over the place on warm tropical evenings). The light zapped them right there, piling them up in a tray, from which we took them and threw them directly in a big oiled pan and tossed them with spice. Delicious, free protein right out of the sky - talk about easy hunting!

On the other hand, some bugs served in Southeast Asia are barely patable and I'm probably the most adventurous eater I know. lol I'd have to agree the thought of cocroach milk is pretty unnerving...I've eaten cockroach before (I think, anyways) and you can definitely put them in the less palatable category, even if raised in a sterile environment. For obvious reasons.

Other bugs made into a flour or protein bar wouldn't bother me in the slightest. The info on their nutritional value has been out there for a long time.

As a forum full of traveling types, most of us realize that aversion to different type of foods is generally rooted in culture. If you eat prawns it's hard to say that bugs are inherently disgusting for any real reason outside of conditioning - I suppose you could make an argument that small crustaceans that live in water are likely cleaner than insects that live on land, especially the ones in urban areas, but if you're eating farmed shrimp that'd probably be a tougher argument to make.

That said, shrimp is a lot tastier and meatier than most insects.

For the record, I'm not opposed to the idea of eating insect products a little more often or especially leaning on the advantages of great nutritional value and speed of reproduction in places where feeding people is a substantial problem. But you probably won't catch me switching from steak to a bug pattie to save the world anytime soon.

In any case they've certainly got their work cut out for them trying to take this mainstream in a place like America.
 

kamoz

Kingfisher
Gold Member
MichaelWitcoff said:
I think at this point they’re just pushing to see how far they can go, trying to humiliate the masses to the greatest possible extent. Remember that they are not simply wrong, they are overtly malicious and take pleasure in hurting the people they think of as their slaves and subjects.
Humiliation is exactly right. I used a paper straw for the first time a month or so ago. Didn't even realize it was a paper straw until I put it in my mouth, recoiled, spit, and thought "wtf did i forget to take the wrapper off?" I then examined the specimen to discover that it was indeed a paper straw. The elite are laughing as we allow them to subject ourselves to these things.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
They're going to make bug farms then next thing you know they are all going to escape. Like the locusts.

I say the world needs less bugs. Bees, mosquitos, flys, all are a pain in the ass. Get them out of here.

Aloha!
 

Beyond Borders

Peacock
Gold Member
^ That would definitely be a concern with the huge cockroach farms in the middle of Chinese cities. A breach would be a horror movie in the flesh.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
Sorry to open this can of mealworms, but is eating bugs vegan?

Bugs don't feel pain, yes they are alive, but plants are too. Vegans eat plants with bacteria on it. Bacteria is a bug.

Aloha!
 

Captain Gh

Ostrich
Gold Member
VNvet said:
The CNN piece reads more like a sales pitch than news. Here's a brief breakdown on media brainwashing at work.

On a morning in the not-too-distant future, you might toast bread made with cricket flour, drink a protein smoothie made from locust powder, and eat scrambled eggs (made extra-creamy with the fat from mopane caterpillars) with a side of mealworm bacon.
This is the predictive programming part. They're seeding the idea of eating bugs in your mind.

No way you'll eat bugs, you say?

Well, sorry to break this to you, but if you eat chocolate, pizza and spaghetti, you are already eating insects -- and worse.
Good rebuttal to the most obvious objection.

Your friends and neighbors are already munching on insects. According to a report by Global Market Insights, the US edible insect market topped $55 million in 2017 and is expected to grow to nearly $80 million by 2024.
Many countries and traditions have known this for decades, even centuries. According to a 2013 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), at least 2 billion people worldwide eat bugs every day.

Everyone else is doing it, so you may as well do it. This type of sales pitch works EXTREMELY well.

"I've eaten bugs in many countries: termites, scorpions, beetle larvae, grasshoppers, silkworms. All very common," said entomologist Jeff Tomberlin, who directs the forensic and investigative sciences program at Texas A&M University.
An appeal to authority.

And then there's the biggest selling point: Devouring bugs instead of methane-producing livestock is an easy, excellent way to deliver quality nutrition to the masses of humanity while helping the environment.
If it's the biggest selling point, then why is it the last selling point that you mention?

Doesn't make much sense to me.

***

I'm wondering what the endgame with promoting bug eating to the NPCs is?

My guess is that the lack of nutrients make people weak and stupid, which makes them unable to resist a tyrannical government. But I'm not sure.
It is what it is... but the mofo who wrote that is a HECK of a Copywriter though! Will definitely steal that structure for some upcoming affiliate sites!
 

MajorStyles

Kingfisher
MichaelWitcoff said:
I think at this point they’re just pushing to see how far they can go, trying to humiliate the masses to the greatest possible extent. Remember that they are not simply wrong, they are overtly malicious and take pleasure in hurting the people they think of as their slaves and subjects.
THIS.

No other annotations or footnotes are needed. It's about seeing how far the average Joe (or Jane) will go in the arena of self-debasement. Sadly, up until this point, we've that Joe and Jane are willing to go pretty damn low.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Bugs are a great solution for feeding fowl and certain aquaculture products instead of many current industrial feeds. You could for example get better tasting, healthier eggs from chicken on a mixed bug and grain diet, which is closer to their natural diet.

Of course that's not what is advocated here.
 
I think it's just an attempt to cattle'ize people and to remove them from culture and history as much as possible. Communism was all about this.

Depressing public housing:



Tech autists (the future technocrats that serve as a buffer for globalists) promoting soylent (which the elites figured is probably much more expensive than bugmeal):



The origins of soylent:

In the year 2022, as a consequence of the Industrial Revolution, 40 million people live in New York City alone, and there is year round humidity because of the greenhouse effect and shortages of water, food and housing. Only the city's elite can afford clean water and natural food, and even then at horrendously high prices. The homes of the elite usually include concubines who are referred to as "furniture" and serve the tenants as slaves. Within the city lives New York City Police Department detective Frank Thorn with his aged friend and police analyst Solomon "Sol" Roth. Roth remembers the world when it had animals and real food, and possesses a small library of reference materials to assist Thorn. Thorn is tasked with investigating the murder of the wealthy and influential William R. Simonson, and quickly learns that Simonson had been assassinated and was a board member of Soylent Industries.

Soylent Industries, which derives its name from a combination of "soy" and "lentil", controls the food supply of half of the world and sells the artificially produced wafers, including "Soylent Red" and "Soylent Yellow". Their latest product is the far more flavorful and nutritious "Soylent Green", which is allegedly made from plankton and is in short supply. As a result of the weekly supply bottlenecks, the hungry masses regularly riot, and they are brutally removed from the streets by means of police vehicles that scoop the rioters with large shovels and dump them within the vehicle's container. With the help of the concubine Shirl, with whom Thorn begins a relationship, the investigation leads to a priest that Simonson visited and confessed to shortly before his death. The priest is only able to hint toward a gruesome truth before he himself is murdered. By order of the governor, Thorn is instructed to end the investigation, but he presses on. He is attacked during a riot, but the assassin loses him and gets himself killed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soylent_Green

First soylent, then bugs, then recycled humans in the globalist commie utopia...
 

Leonard D Neubache

Owl
Gold Member
MajorStyles said:
MichaelWitcoff said:
I think at this point they’re just pushing to see how far they can go, trying to humiliate the masses to the greatest possible extent. Remember that they are not simply wrong, they are overtly malicious and take pleasure in hurting the people they think of as their slaves and subjects.
THIS.

No other annotations or footnotes are needed. It's about seeing how far the average Joe (or Jane) will go in the arena of self-debasement. Sadly, up until this point, we've that Joe and Jane are willing to go pretty damn low.
The one passage in Orwell's 1984 that stood out for me most was this one:

He (O'Brien) paused, and for a moment assumed again his air of a schoolmaster questioning a promising pupil: 'How does one man assert his power over another, Winston?'

Winston thought. 'By making him suffer,' he said.

'Exactly. By making him suffer. Obedience is not enough. Unless he is suffering, how can you be sure that he is obeying your will and not his own? Power is in inflicting pain and humiliation.
This passage is particularly powerful because it allows the reader to accept finally that he cannot simply go-along-to-get-along with a true tyrant. Even if he concedes utterly to all demands of him, he will still be made to suffer purely so that the tyrant knows for certain that the underling is not doing what he might do anyway, because if that were the case then the tyrant's power would be imaginary, and they cannot stand to not know if their own will is all encompassing.
 

JohnKreese

Pelican
Even on the dystopian "Snowpiercer" train, the dregs of society were horrified at the realization that they were eating bugs


No thanks
 
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