Elon Musk thread

dicknixon72

Pelican
I've said it before and I'll say it again - Tesla will be remembered for catalyzing the popularity of electric cars, but GM, Ford, BMW, Mercedes, VW, et al will be the ones to put them in people's garages...
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
It's so bizarre how someone can become one of the richest people in the world with insane government subsidies, no need to show any profit, crony deals, Central Bank printing.

I like that once in a while he says based things, but yikes, his whole business model is nuts. Something is so off about him.
Rich people are created. Not the millionaires, but the 100+ billionaires? Sure they are allowed by the elite. No way Gill Bates, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk and the likes just came out of nothing. It's the same as with popstars. CardiB a sponataneous phenomenon? Give me a break. These guys are gofers. I find it difficult to estimate Elon Musk for he appears to be somewhat red pilled in some of his commentaries about cojona for example, but on the other hand with Neuralink and his technological realm he's fully essential of the globalist plans too. He seems to be a bit more the better guy than the others and not knowingly what's going on entirely, however this could be a show.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Lately I've been watching YouTube videos showing the cockpits of large airliners during takeoffs and landings, like this one:


It's fascinating to see how the airline transportation system works.

One thing I notice is that there is some inefficiency in how that system operates. A lot of time is lost running the checklists, waiting for a clearance, pushing back the plane, taxying to the runway, waiting for their turn to take off, etc. The spacing requirements to keep airplanes safely distant from each other creates a capacity restriction, especially around major airports.

Something like the Hyperloop, if it is a viable technology, would resolve a lot of those issues. With ground-based transportation, the prep times and spacing requirements are significantly compressed in comparison with airline travel. Many more people could be in motion at any one time than currently can with air travel. Also, the resources required to operate an inter-connected hyperloop system would be less during maintenance and operations mode than there is with airline travel. If hyperloop technology can be made to work, I think it will eventually, perhaps in about 50 years, greatly reduce the demand for travel by airplane. However, the trains might be restricted to continental travel, as I don't see how they could economically build those tubes across the oceans.


Of course, if they build Hyperloop stations like this in Democratic-run cities in the US, they would not be so pristine and orderly as depicted in that video.
 
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dicknixon72

Pelican
Lately I've been watching YouTube videos showing the cockpits of large airliners during takeoffs and landings, like this one:


It's fascinating to see how the airline transportation system works.

One thing I notice is that there is some inefficiency in how that system operates. A lot of time is lost running the checklists, waiting for a clearance, pushing back the plane, taxying to the runway, waiting for their turn to take off, etc. The spacing requirements to keep airplanes safely distant from each other creates a capacity restriction, especially around major airports.

Those 'inefficiencies' are the result of a lot of lives over the years, including these...

 

cosine

Robin
I've said it before and I'll say it again - Tesla will be remembered for catalyzing the popularity of electric cars, but GM, Ford, BMW, Mercedes, VW, et al will be the ones to put them in people's garages...
Looks like Lucid is upping the electric car game. They appear to be directly challenging Tesla:

I was skeptical of Tesla for quite a while. In 2014 I visited India, decided humans were screwed, and that Tesla would never build a tuk-tuk or anything remotely of that scale. Their stated plan of beginning with luxury cars and then scaling down in price and up in quantity seemed fantastical.

Now the model 3 is still expensive, but the model 25k is on the horizon, and they have actually bought land for a factory in Bangalore, India, which is intended to build a mass-production vehicle that Indian people can actually buy. Tesla is crushing manufacturing and will actually be the Toyota of electric vehicles.

Not to mention the semi trucks, and everyone will want a cybertruck.

Lucid and Rivian are both the high-end luxury versions that won't scale like Tesla.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I remember about five years ago when the consensus on this forum was that Tesla was headed for catastrophic, humiliating failure. Well, Tesla today announced a record quarterly net profit of $1 billion, and made and sold about 240,000 cars over the past three months. Also, Musk just got approval from Las Vegas to build all of his desired "Tesla's in tunnels" network in that city.

I'm not trying to give anyone a hard time, because at that time I also believe Tesla was in big trouble. I'll have to look more closely at what happened to help determine why I got it wrong.
 

cosine

Robin
I remember about five years ago when the consensus on this forum was that Tesla was headed for catastrophic, humiliating failure. Well, Tesla today announced a record quarterly net profit of $1 billion, and made and sold about 240,000 cars over the past three months. Also, Musk just got approval from Las Vegas to build all of his desired "Tesla's in tunnels" network in that city.

I'm not trying to give anyone a hard time, because at that time I also believe Tesla was in big trouble. I'll have to look more closely at what happened to help determine why I got it wrong.
Anytime you have a huge new company, idea, etc, there's a question of "sounds nice, but will it actually stick, will it actually pass some fulcrum of challenges? Or, will it fizzle out before it can scale?"
Everything from the manhattan project, to early internet companies, bitcoin, etc, all went through that. It's the reason VC firms invest in many companies and not just 1-2; even they can't get it right. But if they invest in 50 companies, only one has to be Facebook.

Everything around the internet went through that -- Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, Netflix all could have easily tanked at some point. We saw stacks of companies crumple during the .com bust. That pain seems to have never gone away from investors' minds, even when tech is clearly now entrenched.

Tesla has the added difficulty of overcoming global manufacturing processes. I had the, "sounds nice, but I bet they collapse before they can scale, selling cars at Mercedes prices can only get you so far" sort of thought.

To me it seems like somewhere in 2019 with the Tesla Model 3 struggles is where they passed some ultimate test. Now they also have 30% gross margins(very high for a car company), and the Berlin and Austin factories are massive and will begin ramping up production at some point. The next couple of years for Tesla will be amazing.

Also, now they have more data on self-driving than all other competitors combined.
 
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