Elon Musk thread

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
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C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
How does corporate governance play out in practice? Would he need a majority share to change twitter? Does a 9% share give him some influence? Would they defy him even if he did have a majority share?
It's definitely a shot across their bow. I don't know if that gives him the largest percentage as a single shareholder but, owning almost 10% of the company means that they'll have to listen to him. It gives him enough leverage that he could strongly influence decisions regarding the current board and the compensation and even the retainment of the current CEO and other corporate officers.
 

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
It's definitely a shot across their bow. I don't know if that gives him the largest percentage as a single shareholder but, owning almost 10% of the company means that they'll have to listen to him. It gives him enough leverage that he could strongly influence decisions regarding the current board and the compensation and even the retainment of the current CEO and other corporate officers.
From what I understand he's now the largest individual shareholder.
 

SaintPiusX

Robin
Trad Catholic
Elon strikes me as a chaotic good figure. He doesn't follow rules and is generally unpredictable, but he's clearly doesn't align with the Satanic forces running things in the west. He seems like an intelligent man who, having watched too many sci-fi and fantasy movies as a child, decided to built his own sci-fi universe, but having realized that such projects require dealing with idiots, doesn't really follow through with them. It would explain why so many of his projects are half-baked and end up nowhere. He also has that bleak but ironic cynicism that pervaded the early 90s and which is common in Gen X and Millennials, where formalities and social cues don't really matter except the jokes that can extracted from them.

If nothing else comes out of this Twitter purchase beyond the triggering of the trannies, I would say it is a job well done.
 

cosine

Woodpecker
Yes, does appear to be the case. That being said, The globo-homo Cereberus of investment funds, State Street, Blackrock, and Vanguard, make up about 17.5% together. Those 3 companies are also the largest 3 "individual" shareholders of Pfizer and Moderna.
How does shareholder voting work with companies like Vanguard, where the assets are owned by an enormous pile of clients through ETFs and such?
 
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