Emergency Prepping

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
I'm starting to make a "bug out bag" (my husband hates this phrase) or emergency prepping if you will. I had a basic one but don't feel like it encompasses enough or I'm missing some things. What are the essentials? I am looking more in the lines of preparing for situations like having to immediately relocate because of government/society issues or natural disasters that are unsafe for my kids. Where I live we don't have many natural disasters really except for extreme heat/desert so I'll need to take that into consideration too. If you have links to helpful websites or posts that's also welcomed!
 

epps_1920

Pigeon
I'd recommend some midland FRS/GMRS radios you can pick up at any dept store or online. It's a bare minimum to have for communication if cell phones are down. At least a 2 pack or more, pending on what you can spend.
 

epps_1920

Pigeon
 

M'bare

Woodpecker
Gold Member
We have a pretty good thread on here discussing survivalism/prepping. I'd say start there, and my personal favorite prepping channel is Canadian Prepper. Admittedly I've purchased stuff from Amazon, but trying to give them the least amount of business possible. Not only does he have his own store, but also tries out the gear, gives reasonable expectations, etc.

It's one thing to know what to buy, but more difficult to get good gear/know which brand. I bought a "survival shovel" for example one time and when it arrived I realized it was garbage.

But as always, hit the basics and try to keep it under 30 pounds. If you really have to bug out, and can't use your vehicle, then consider having bicycles if you don't already have them.

For food think lightweight like freeze dried mountain house, but also granola bars when you don't have time to prepare something.
Water filters -- I like the Survivor Filter. Much better protection than say the popular Life Straw.
Shelter/warmth. (multiple ways to start a fire)
Baby wipes and other sanitation.
Survival knowledge book. (SAS survival guide specifically)

This is all just scratching the surface -- so many other little things to consider like two way radios, binoculars, compass, and other items can be useful.

Just keep in mind, bugging in is the best bet. Bug out when things are insurmountable, and make sure you have a location you're bugging out to.
 
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Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Bug out bags for adults are pretty straight forward, imo. It’s like being prepared for an extended backpacking trip. However, I think we forget about special items for our kids. So, I would suggest a few of these items:
-a good current mugshot photo of each child in case (God forbid) they’re somehow separated from you
-high calorie nutrient dense foods that your children will actually eat. I know my son would not touch any kind of dehydrated/camping food. So for him, I’d pack peanut butter and Nutella, a couple different kinds of protein bars, raisins, maybe a few treats/candies for morale/bargaining (lol) etc.
-a kids multi-vitamin with iron to help with any missing nutrients
-powdered milk, Tang (or other drink powder with vitamin c), Gatorade powder (or other electrolyte drink mix). Sports squirt bottle or sippy cup if they need them.
-emergency whistle attached to your child’s backpack
-comfort items. If your child won’t sleep without a teddy and blanky, bring them (but just *one* teddy and *one* blanky lol). Maybe a few small toys and paper/crayons to keep them entertained during down time.
-plenty of changes of clothes especially socks and underwear. Think of different layers. Long sleeved SPF sun shirts. Wide brimmed hat.
-diapering/feeding needs and sunscreen
 
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Easy_C

Peacock
I'm starting to make a "bug out bag" (my husband hates this phrase) or emergency prepping if you will. I had a basic one but don't feel like it encompasses enough or I'm missing some things. What are the essentials? I am looking more in the lines of preparing for situations like having to immediately relocate because of government/society issues or natural disasters that are unsafe for my kids. Where I live we don't have many natural disasters really except for extreme heat/desert so I'll need to take that into consideration too. If you have links to helpful websites or posts that's also welcomed!

Look up terrence Popp's playslists on Alt tech.
 
try to keep it under 30 pounds.

I recommend hiking at least once with a 30 lb bag. Make sure you're thinking about what bags you're using too. A duffel is fine but you're never going to carry it 10 miles if it weighs anything. A 60 liter backpacking bag is what I suggest and 27 lbs max.

A lot depends on where your plan A is to end up. A hotel? Friends house in another state? Have a plan with exact details. Too many people think they're going to bug out to the woods...and as someone who's working up to extended time alone in remote places, I can assure you most people have no idea.

Also, shelter. You're not carrying any tent that'll fit many people without spending cash. I have friends with a 20 lb tent for 8. Who do they think's going to carry that if needed? A tent for your car is good but look at tarps and other options.

Biggest recommend though: 3 days clothing for everyone.
 

Easy_C

Peacock


 

Easy_C

Peacock
For "Shelter". In most condtions you'll be fine with a poncho, a water proof sleeping bag, a foam mat, and some cordage. I've spent plenty of nights outside in nasty conditions without a tent and was fine.
 

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
We have a pretty good thread on here discussing survivalism/prepping. I'd say start there, and my personal favorite prepping channel is Canadian Prepper. Admittedly I've purchased stuff from Amazon, but trying to give them the least amount of business possible. Not only does he have his own store, but also tries out the gear, gives reasonable expectations, etc.

It's one thing to know what to buy, but more difficult to get good gear/know which brand. I bought a "survival shovel" for example one time and when it arrived I realized it was garbage.

But as always, hit the basics and try to keep it under 30 pounds. If you really have to bug out, and can't use your vehicle, then consider having bicycles if you don't already have them.

For food think lightweight like freeze dried mountain house, but also granola bars when you don't have time to prepare something.
Water filters -- I like the Survivor Filter. Much better protection than say the popular Life Straw.
Shelter/warmth. (multiple ways to start a fire)
Baby wipes and other sanitation.
Survival knowledge book. (SAS survival guide specifically)

This is all just scratching the surface -- so many other little things to consider like two way radios, binoculars, compass, and other items can be useful.

Just keep in mind, bugging in is the best bet. Bug out when things are insurmountable, and make sure you have a location you're bugging out to.
I tried using the search function to see if it was in the forum but didn't see anything. Do you happen to have the link or know where it is? I'll check out Canadian Prepper, thanks! We have the Life Straw but I'll check out the Survivor filter.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
I recommend hiking at least once with a 30 lb bag. Make sure you're thinking about what bags you're using too. A duffel is fine but you're never going to carry it 10 miles if it weighs anything. A 60 liter backpacking bag is what I suggest and 27 lbs max.

A lot depends on where your plan A is to end up. A hotel? Friends house in another state? Have a plan with exact details. Too many people think they're going to bug out to the woods...and as someone who's working up to extended time alone in remote places, I can assure you most people have no idea.

Also, shelter. You're not carrying any tent that'll fit many people without spending cash. I have friends with a 20 lb tent for 8. Who do they think's going to carry that if needed? A tent for your car is good but look at tarps and other options.

Biggest recommend though: 3 days clothing for everyone.
No need to get an 8 person tent! Do 4 and 4 or 3,3, and 2. Split the weight between people.

Definitely agree to have an idea of different scenarios of where you will go and know how to get there without gps as well as multiple routes in case highways are gridlocked.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
I’d recommend just taking an orienteering course. There’s a number of good instructors out there and the skill set isn’t hard to learn. It does require some maintenance but that can easily be done as part of other outdoor activities.

For the bag I’d recommend doing the hike more than “at least once”. It takes consistent training for your body to acclimate to and strengthen the various connective and non-connective tissues that are stressed by this sort of thing. Otherwise you’ll suffer issues ranging from blisters up to stress fractures (small bone fracture caused by repetitive stress on weak bones) when you try to do a long movement outdoors. To be in good hiking shape you should be able to do 3 miles per hour (for a lady. Men should target 4 mph) and maintain that pace for 15 miles barring any injury or condition that would prevent that.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
Does no one here camp or hike regularly?? That’s so weird to me. A bug out bag is like a pre-packed camping bag... My husband could get up tomorrow at 6:30am and say we’re going on a 5 day camping trip to the boonies (anything under two nights isn’t worth the trouble) and I would have the entire house packed up by 8:30am latest (and that’s for 5 people and a baby). Just curious....

Practice is definitely important. You should try to do as many dry runs (ie, camping vacations) as you can because then you’ll know what you actually need for your specific family and what you can leave at home. You’ll also know how much time it takes you to pack up. When my husband and I first went camping with our two children, it took us at least half a day to pack up. Now, since we’ve done it so many times and know exactly what we need, we can pack up in less than two hours for our family of six for a trip that’s at least 3 nights (and that’s in a non-emergency scenario).

Tarps and rope? Common... Yeah in a pinch, but just buy a quality tent so your family won’t get wet and cold... Btw- “tarps” are heavier and bulkier than a good tent.
 
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No need to get an 8 person tent! Do 4 and 4 or 3,3, and 2. Split the weight between people.

It's still more weight. A cheap 4 person tent (which is really like a 2.5 person fit) weighs 10 pounds. If you're forced to walk, that's added group weight. When I go out I measure by total group pack weight. The videos @Easy_C shared show why you should have a PACE plan that includes walking.

Tarps and rope? Common... Yeah in a pinch, but just buy a quality tent so your family won’t get wet and cold... Btw- “tarps” are heavier and bulkier than a good tent.

False. My tarp weighs 3 lbs and can lean-to to fit 8 people. It cost less than 99% of tents on the market. Find me a tent that can do that, has the flexibility of a 100 setups and can be deployed in under a minute. Oh and it has to be able to do stealth mode too.
 
My advice: Do you have a place to go to when you bug-out? Figure that spot out, then leave your bug-out bag THERE.

A little while ago, "The fire planes are overhead, we need to go." A short car drive late, and we're opening our bug-out bags that were already sitting at the in-law's, and we could just open them up for fresh clothes and other essentials.

Outside the window by me right now: If you started walking...

1. You'll be walking a circle because most people don't know how to walk in a straight line in the wilderness, and experiments have actually verified that people do just that.

2. If you manage to walk straight, you'll be walking into several thousand square miles of national forest, when it comes to Mountain Lions, better you than me.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
just finished both my bug in and bug out prep. you want a amazon list? make sure you start with water
Would you mind PMing the list? I have a basic kit already (water, gasoline, & ammo being the top items), but I’m interested in what other things I could stock up on.
 
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