Emergency Prepping

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
My advice: Do you have a place to go to when you bug-out? Figure that spot out, then leave your bug-out bag THERE.

A little while ago, "The fire planes are overhead, we need to go." A short car drive late, and we're opening our bug-out bags that were already sitting at the in-law's, and we could just open them up for fresh clothes and other essentials.

Outside the window by me right now: If you started walking...

1. You'll be walking a circle because most people don't know how to walk in a straight line in the wilderness, and experiments have actually verified that people do just that.

2. If you manage to walk straight, you'll be walking into several thousand square miles of national forest, when it comes to Mountain Lions, better you than me.
We have a couple of options, all would be at least a 20 hour drive so I'm thinking we need a bag that can get us there.
 

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
Does no one here camp or hike regularly?? That’s so weird to me. A bug out bag is like a pre-packed camping bag... My husband could get up tomorrow at 6:30am and say we’re going on a 5 day camping trip to the boonies (anything under two nights isn’t worth the trouble) and I would have the entire house packed up by 8:30am latest (and that’s for 5 people and a baby). Just curious....

Practice is definitely important. You should try to do as many dry runs (ie, camping vacations) as you can because then you’ll know what you actually need for your specific family and what you can leave at home. You’ll also know how much time it takes you to pack up. When my husband and I first went camping with our two children, it took us at least half a day to pack up. Now, since we’ve done it so many times and know exactly what we need, we can pack up in less than two hours for our family of six for a trip that’s at least 3 nights (and that’s in a non-emergency scenario).

Tarps and rope? Common... Yeah in a pinch, but just buy a quality tent so your family won’t get wet and cold... Btw- “tarps” are heavier and bulkier than a good tent.
We actually haven't gone camping as a family yet, just hiking with them on our backs (they are 35 ish pounds including the carrier each) in our situation we want to get to a safer location (or best option- be able to survive at home) and not camp in the woods, but I'm sure we could if we had to. We have all camping gear too.
 

Starlight

Woodpecker
Woman
It's still more weight. A cheap 4 person tent (which is really like a 2.5 person fit) weighs 10 pounds. If you're forced to walk, that's added group weight. When I go out I measure by total group pack weight. The videos @Easy_C shared show why you should have a PACE plan that includes walking.



False. My tarp weighs 3 lbs and can lean-to to fit 8 people. It cost less than 99% of tents on the market. Find me a tent that can do that, has the flexibility of a 100 setups and can be deployed in under a minute. Oh and it has to be able to do stealth mode too.
The location we would be going if it required an “inna woods” scenario there are lots of mosquitos (add in a bug mesh or bivy for each person), occasional heavy downpours (add in a bathtub ground cover so we don’t wake up in a puddle), and the possibility of having to stop overnight somewhere with no trees or anything to tack a tarp up to (add in polls), and stakes are still needed. Yes, the tarp itself might weigh very little, however after adding in any additional gear the weight does add up. I’m sure a bunch of adults could manage without the extra stuff but I have to consider my little children. They need to not only be safe but feel safe. They need to be warm and dry (and also not able to wander away from our camp in the middle of the night.) We could debate tarp vs tent until the cows come home but it really depends on what the need is. I definitely agree that tarps are cheaper but a quality tent (for what I would need it for) is hard to beat imo.

We actually haven't gone camping as a family yet, just hiking with them on our backs (they are 35 ish pounds including the carrier each) in our situation we want to get to a safer location (or best option- be able to survive at home) and not camp in the woods, but I'm sure we could if we had to. We have all camping gear too.
I would do a “day camping” trip where you pack up your gear like you would if you were to spend the night (minus the sleeping bags). That way, at least, you can get used to setting up and breaking down your tent (or tarp) and it’s just really fun too. It’ll help give you an idea of what extra things you might’ve needed or could do without and how much time it really takes to get everything into the car plus children (everything always takes longer with little kids lol) or if you can even fit all the stuff you want to take.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
Copy Pasting from elsewhere in case anyone not acive in tha subforum needs to see it:


Here is your basic need. First, you need to be able to detect protests. A number of resources are available such as protest maps, police scanners, etc.

You need to have a Four tier plan. First is how are you going to get out of your immediate house and neighborhood with everyone in tow? If you're not averse to hopping fences during a protest event, which is generally going to be easy to do because people's attention will be focused towards the street, you should mentally map out which route you're going to take in order to get out of your area.

Second is how are you going to get out of the immediate area? Know how you're going to get to your main route of travel. and do so without hitting any areas likely to be hotspots. You have to decide this because you know your town and we don't. However there are some generic considerations. You want to avoid known hotspots, commercial centers which will attract looters, neighborhoods you can't move safely in, Any good gathering area like stadiums, open fields, airports, fairgrounds [ because those are common staging areas for things like national guard and NGO orgs), and extremely dense downtown areas.

Next, be prepared to move along your main route of travel. First sort out what you're bringing with you. A lot of good information on a travel bag is already available [with the best video being from terrence Popp] so the only thing I'll add here is that you need more socks than you think and {unless it is winter) you don't need nearly as much sleeping gear as you think and you will be fine with a poncho, cordage, and a light bag. What's a bit more dicey is that for the length of movement needed to get out of Minneapolis on foot you may want to look at planting some caches with food, water, a bit of cash, and clothes. It's done much more easily than people think if you plan your movement smartly to avoid residential property.

After that you need to think about where you're going next. It is best to have friends in a further out area that you already have an arrangement in places with. Failing that be prepared to hop to another town and hope it's localized or camp outside for awhile. How to be prepared for this?

My recommendation is to hop on your local online marketplace or whatever, buy a garbage can car that's road worthy, load it up with plenty of non-perishable food, water, hygiene supplies, enough cash to get where you're going + some to spare, and some camping supplies, then drop it in a storage center that you've prepaid for 6-12 months. You may also want to think about stashing extra gas cans there but keep in mind you'll need to go back and rotate those out every few months.

Look at the following criteria for a location: heading there takes you out of town and not further into it, you can get there by utilizing urban E&E on foot techniques with an easy way to navigate there such as following rail lines or other non-road/highway infrastructure and waterways, the location isn't shady or an easy target itself, and you'll be pre-positioned to go in the direction you want to go once you get there.
 

Luna Novem

Woodpecker
Woman
Does no one here camp or hike regularly?? That’s so weird to me. A bug out bag is like a pre-packed camping bag... My husband could get up tomorrow at 6:30am and say we’re going on a 5 day camping trip to the boonies (anything under two nights isn’t worth the trouble) and I would have the entire house packed up by 8:30am latest (and that’s for 5 people and a baby). Just curious....

Practice is definitely important. You should try to do as many dry runs (ie, camping vacations) as you can because then you’ll know what you actually need for your specific family and what you can leave at home. You’ll also know how much time it takes you to pack up. When my husband and I first went camping with our two children, it took us at least half a day to pack up. Now, since we’ve done it so many times and know exactly what we need, we can pack up in less than two hours for our family of six for a trip that’s at least 3 nights (and that’s in a non-emergency scenario).

Tarps and rope? Common... Yeah in a pinch, but just buy a quality tent so your family won’t get wet and cold... Btw- “tarps” are heavier and bulkier than a good tent.
We do enjoy camping, but we always go to state campgrounds. I don't know if that's what you mean as far as ruggedness. We aren't "glampers" by any means (no RV) but we do find sites with running water and bathroom facilities.
 

M'bare

Woodpecker
Gold Member
I tried using the search function to see if it was in the forum but didn't see anything. Do you happen to have the link or know where it is? I'll check out Canadian Prepper, thanks! We have the Life Straw but I'll check out the Survivor filter.

 
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