Endurance cardio- pros and cons

When it comes to cardio, it's simple for me:

"You will run. You will enjoy every step of your run, or you will keep running until you do."

(Yeah... I have no friends...)

Running is only part of the whole equation.

You need "a good mix." Go for hikes, especially with a heavy backpack. Don't use the excuse of living in a city, walk out your front door, pick a direction, and walk for 15 minutes, then turn around and walk back home for 15 minutes, that'll count as an "urban hike."

Do long distance running. Run uphill, downhill, straight and level. Do sprints. Do pull-ups. Lift heavy compound weights. Eat healthy foods. Drink lots of water. Work a punching bag/BOB bag with HIIT workouts with different punches, ducking, kicks (basically find the hardest kick-boxing gym you can, and workout until you pass out.)

With a partner, get ahold of two cheap white shirts that you can afford to throw out. With a felt tip pen, work with them as if they were knives. Your partner works to stab/slash you, you work to block them. Do that for a minute, then switch roles. After that, look are your shirts, and tell me how much you want to get into a knife fight.

If you want to go "more intense" throw in working with a blunt weapon like a baseball bat, or even an unloaded firearms with a BOB dummy. "This drugged-out loser wants to rape your sister behind you, slam the butt and then the barrel of your shotgun into his face while screaming like a maniac!" "Use the butt of your pistol to bash in this loser's face!" (Yes call the bag/dummy/opponent a "loser." That "little bit" of extra psychology boost will help.)

But I'm a weirdo who's been told he looks "intimidating" in the past, so take what I say with a grain of salt.
 

Batman_

Kingfisher
I've been running more lately, but I hate it. I only do it to improve my cardiovascular health. I typically run 1 mile on lift days, and then set aside 1-2 days a week where I run for an hour or so. Ultimately I want to reach the point where I can run 10mph nonstop for about 45-60 minutes, but that's a ways off.

I remember reading years ago that HIIT regimens can confer the same cardiovascular benefits as running, along with increasing lean mass and speed. I might start doing sprints again. I much prefer those over running, it's just so abysmal, especially "jogging" / slow running that's drawn out.
 
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C-Note

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I've been running more lately, but I hate it. I only do it to improve my cardiovascular health. I typically run 1 mile on lift days, and then set aside 1-2 days a week where I run for an hour or so. Ultimately I want to reach the point where I can run 10mph nonstop for about 45-60 minutes, but that's a ways off.

I remember reading years ago that HIIT regimens can confer the same cardiovascular benefits as running, along with increasing lean mass and speed. I might start doing sprints again. I much prefer those over running, it's just so abysmal, especially "jogging" / slow running that's drawn out.
I've done HIIT before and I did find it to be just as effective, if not more so, than long sessions of cardio at a moderate pace. The problem for me is that I really have to kill myself to get my heartrate into the "max" zone and keep it there for a minute.

One way to handle cardio workouts if you hate running is to mix-in some cross training. Get a bicycle and ride it every-other-day instead of running, or do some swimming, elliptical machine, stairs, Jacob's ladder/mountain climbers, etc. To save the wear on my joints I train on a treadmill and read a book on my Kindle while I'm running. During the winter I'll train on a stationary bike while reading a book. Swimming, unfortunately, doesn't allow that but I've heard that there are earplug headphones that you can use to listen to music. I might try to get a pair because I find swimming laps to be dreadfully boring and tedious.
 
I've done HIIT before and I did find it to be just as effective, if not more so, than long sessions of cardio at a moderate pace. The problem for me is that I really have to kill myself to get my heartrate into the "max" zone and keep it there for a minute.

One way to handle cardio workouts if you hate running is to mix-in some cross training. Get a bicycle and ride it every-other-day instead of running, or do some swimming, elliptical machine, stairs, Jacob's ladder/mountain climbers, etc. To save the wear on my joints I train on a treadmill and read a book on my Kindle while I'm running. During the winter I'll train on a stationary bike while reading a book. Swimming, unfortunately, doesn't allow that but I've heard that there are earplug headphones that you can use to listen to music. I might try to get a pair because I find swimming laps to be dreadfully boring and tedious.
It depends on how you define effectiveness. From a calorie and consistency standpoint it is really ineffective. The only ones who should be doing HIIT are athletes and people with no free time at all. Fatties, average Joes, less disciplined people and people seeking to reduce their bodyweight should be doing moderate intensity cardio.
 
It depends on how you define effectiveness. From a calorie and consistency standpoint it is really ineffective. The only ones who should be doing HIIT are athletes and people with no free time at all. Fatties, average Joes, less disciplined people and people seeking to reduce their bodyweight should be doing moderate intensity cardio.
Or just don't bother with cardio at all and instead shorten your rest periods between sets. The only things cardio is good for is building your endurance and improving cardiovascular health. Does pretty much nothing to benefit what most people use it for, which is weight loss. If you don't train like a pussy, you can get almost as much cardiovascular befit from lifting and probably 1/4 of the endurance benefit if you use moderate rep ranges, killing 2 and 1/2 birds with one stone. Being able to run far is not a very useful skill in 2021, I'd rather only have to spend 40 minutes a week to look and feel good instead of 3 hours or w/e. If you need weight loss it's 95% diet. Cardio might actually do the opposite as most people greatly overestimate how impactful it is and overeat because of that. Known many people who had that problem.
 
Or just don't bother with cardio at all and instead shorten your rest periods between sets. The only things cardio is good for is building your endurance and improving cardiovascular health. Does pretty much nothing to benefit what most people use it for, which is weight loss. If you don't train like a pussy, you can get almost as much cardiovascular befit from lifting and probably 1/4 of the endurance benefit if you use moderate rep ranges, killing 2 and 1/2 birds with one stone. Being able to run far is not a very useful skill in 2021, I'd rather only have to spend 40 minutes a week to look and feel good instead of 3 hours or w/e. If you need weight loss it's 95% diet. Cardio might actually do the opposite as most people greatly overestimate how impactful it is and overeat because of that. Known many people who had that problem.
Completely wrong.
You should not shorten your rest between sets to less than 60 seconds anyway. The heart and the lungs are very important organs, perhaps the most important. Cardiovascular health and building up your endurance are not at all the only benefits. I‘d even add to my points that it even makes you stronger mentally. Contrary to your subjective assessment about weight loss it is worse with weightlifting. I find that people who lift primarily just eat way too much, because they don‘t burn nearly as many calories as they think. The average person in the gym will burn 200 cals while in the gym and eat a protein bar/shake after and a big meal when they come home. Better go do moderate intensity cardio after your lifting session for 20 mins and burn 150-300 cals additionally.
Seriously, most people that say that cardio is not good for you quote dubious studies taken out of context, are fatties, don‘t have any endurance and simply don‘t like cardio.
Plus running is not moderate intensity.

Better not to be tribal about it and just find a balance between the two.
 
Completely wrong.
You should not shorten your rest between sets to less than 60 seconds anyway. The heart and the lungs are very important organs, perhaps the most important. Cardiovascular health and building up your endurance are not at all the only benefits. I‘d even add to my points that it even makes you stronger mentally. Contrary to your subjective assessment about weight loss it is worse with weightlifting. I find that people who lift primarily just eat way too much, because they don‘t burn nearly as many calories as they think. The average person in the gym will burn 200 cals while in the gym and eat a protein bar/shake after and a big meal when they come home. Better go do moderate intensity cardio after your lifting session for 20 mins and burn 150-300 cals additionally.
Seriously, most people that say that cardio is not good for you quote dubious studies taken out of context, are fatties, don‘t have any endurance and simply don‘t like cardio.
Plus running is not moderate intensity.

Better not to be tribal about it and just find a balance between the two.
20 mins is not going to burn 225 cal unless you are doing HIIT. Plus I mentioned the eating more thing. Lifting makes you stronger mentally as well. Any kind of high intensity physical activity would. Also, to be specific, not talking about less than 60 seconds rest periods. What I see in the gym is more like 5+ minute or more rest periods from the majority of ppl. 60-180 seconds is enough to keep your heart rate up. I agree though, do what you like and I never said cardio wasn't good for you. It's just that I like only having to go to the gym once a week for 40 mins. It's really easy to stick with and I've gotten and maintained great results. If you want the most bang for your buck, high intensity resistance training is what to do. Also, the % protein thing on food labels is WAYYY to low. You should get at least 1g per lbs of body weight if you want to build any muscle at all. Plus meat is delicious.
 
Of course it is going to burn that many calories. If you are 185+ and 80 kg+ even easily. You mentioned it in combination with cardio, but it is way worse with fatties that think they are burning many calories. You go once a week for 40 mins? :D it is easy to maintain, because you don‘t need any commitment. The protein debate is a difficult one. People that really focus on eating protein get enough.
 
Of course it is going to burn that many calories. If you are 185+ and 80 kg+ even easily. You mentioned it in combination with cardio, but it is way worse with fatties that think they are burning many calories. You go once a week for 40 mins? :D it is easy to maintain, because you don‘t need any commitment. The protein debate is a difficult one. People that really focus on eating protein get enough.
Even if it does, 225 is like a third of a hamburger. I'm an empiricist at heart and what I see when I go to the gym is that all the fat people are on the cardio equipment and it's always different ones because they don't make progress doing that and give up. The people I see who lift are usually the same people who were there last week and 90% of them aren't fat. And getting enough protein is of paramount importance. I'm 100% confident about that. I've gone without getting enough before, and 0 progress was made. I've been doing this for awhile and don't want to get huge so 40 mins is plenty to maintain what I think most people would consider the ideal level of fitness which is something a bit less muscular than the marvel movie actors, strong but not possibly on steroids. When I first started I went twice a week for about 1 hour each time.
 
Even if it does, 225 is like a third of a hamburger. I'm an empiricist at heart and what I see when I go to the gym is that all the fat people are on the cardio equipment and it's always different ones because they don't make progress doing that and give up. The people I see who lift are usually the same people who were there last week and 90% of them aren't fat. And getting enough protein is of paramount importance. I'm 100% confident about that. I've gone without getting enough before, and 0 progress was made. I've been doing this for awhile and don't want to get huge so 40 mins is plenty to maintain what I think most people would consider the ideal level of fitness which is something a bit less muscular than the marvel movie actors, strong but not possibly on steroids. When I first started I went twice a week for about 1 hour each time.
40 mins a week will not at all get you the ideal level of fitness. If that is your thing-cool, but it is definitely not ideal. The fatties eat too much and are not consistent with cardio. But whatever, this discussion isn‘t going anywhere. Have a nice day.
 
40 mins a week will not at all get you the ideal level of fitness. If that is your thing-cool, but it is definitely not ideal. The fatties eat too much and are not consistent with cardio. But whatever, this discussion isn‘t going anywhere. Have a nice day.
Ideal = top 5% Unless your ideal is arnold swartzenegger, you don't have to make the gym your life to look like a greek statue. 6 pack and I bench 1.5X bw. If more people knew it wasn't that hard to do, I doubt there would be so many fatties or soyboy stickmen.
 

Zagor

Woodpecker
Look into the connection between low intensity cardio and BDNF. There is a huge amout of evidence pointing to the fact that cardio is essential in preserving brain health.
 

FrancisK

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Marathon runners don’t live any longer than pro golfers. Do it because you like it or because you’re training for something but don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re benefitting your health by doing it.

Eating less and eating healthy, living an active clean lifestyle is healthiest for you. Putting unneeded amounts of stress on our bodies is not healthy we do that to look good and feel good, some people do it for performance, but don’t fool yourself into thinking otherwise.

I’m in the gym lifting hard for 5 days a week, I do it to be strong and look good I’m not in there for my health because it’s actually detrimental to my health.

If I wanted to be as “healthy” as possible I would eat less, eat cleaner, live active, do some light resistance training mainly body weight stuff and live clean. I wouldn’t be pounding my body with unnatural weights 5 days a week or pushing my heart against its natural state for sustained periods regularly.
 
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Zagor

Woodpecker
I don't know, I see what you're saying, but I don't think there's evidence that shows that following some sort of bodybuilding/powerlifting/running routine (on an amateur level, not as a professional) is detrimental to one's health in any way. Human body thrives on being challenged after all, but challenged in a way that it can recover and grow stronger. Without challenge there is only stagnation and deterioration.
 
I don't know, I see what you're saying, but I don't think there's evidence that shows that following some sort of bodybuilding/powerlifting/running routine (on an amateur level, not as a professional) is detrimental to one's health in any way. Human body thrives on being challenged after all, but challenged in a way that it can recover and grow stronger. Without challenge there is only stagnation and deterioration.
Nope, your joints will get worn down if you overuse them. Runners have this problem often. Sometimes as early as 35. I agree in spirit though. The harder your effort the greater the return, but over the long term overdoing it can have adverse effects.
 

Zagor

Woodpecker
I'm claiming that body is more than capable of recovering from normal level of exercise. I do not advocate overdoing anything.
 

scorpion

Hummingbird
Gold Member
The human body is not designed to sustain decades' worth of high intensity exercise of any type. You can point to freaks like David Goggins, but those are extreme outliers. Even elite athletes with great genetics usually start to get majorly derailed by injuries in their thirties, and in most sports athletes are no longer competitive by their late 30s. For maximum health and longevity, moderate exercise is definitely best. Walking/hiking is probably the best overall exercise for general health, followed by weightlifting. I think the unfortunate popular perception of cardio (running especially) being the "go-to" exercise for "getting in shape" is probably a big contributor towards obesity. Because distance running is pretty terrible as an exercise. It's tough on the body, doesn't burn as many calories as people think, greatly increases appetite, elevates cortisol and other stress hormones and is extremely uncomfortable. So what happens? People decide they want to "get in shape" and start a running program, and can't stick with it because they either injure themselves or find it simply too uncomfortable to maintain as a habit. So they end up back on the couch and sour towards the idea of exercise, perhaps forever. If they had instead done a program based on walking/hiking with a weighted vest and doing some moderate intensity weightlifting, they would be much more likely to be successful.
 
The human body is not designed to sustain decades' worth of high intensity exercise of any type. You can point to freaks like David Goggins, but those are extreme outliers. Even elite athletes with great genetics usually start to get majorly derailed by injuries in their thirties, and in most sports athletes are no longer competitive by their late 30s. For maximum health and longevity, moderate exercise is definitely best. Walking/hiking is probably the best overall exercise for general health, followed by weightlifting. I think the unfortunate popular perception of cardio (running especially) being the "go-to" exercise for "getting in shape" is probably a big contributor towards obesity. Because distance running is pretty terrible as an exercise. It's tough on the body, doesn't burn as many calories as people think, greatly increases appetite, elevates cortisol and other stress hormones and is extremely uncomfortable. So what happens? People decide they want to "get in shape" and start a running program, and can't stick with it because they either injure themselves or find it simply too uncomfortable to maintain as a habit. So they end up back on the couch and sour towards the idea of exercise, perhaps forever. If they had instead done a program based on walking/hiking with a weighted vest and doing some moderate intensity weightlifting, they would be much more likely to be successful.
Exactly, well put. I'm cutting 5 lockdown pounds right now. Already done with 2 of em. Just cut my nightly ice cream from 5 days a week to 2. Should be finished with the 5 by the time travel reopens. A hell of a lot easier than running for 3 hours a week.
 
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