Escape From 'The New Normal'?

redpillage

Ostrich
Gold Member
For starters, yes I am aware that we already have a thread for policies surrounding the coronavirus epidemic, however given what's going on and where we are heading I believe we all need to consider the medium to long term implications of what is increasingly being termed the 'new normal'. Specifically I am now in the process of considering what parts of the world will offer us an escape from the collective muzzle the Global Elite is increasingly imposing on the wider public.

I am actually one of the lucky ones in that I have remained fairly unscathed from it all over the past six months as I have the luxury of working from home. In addition since gyms were closed here until mid summer I started to work out at home and realized how well it actually works for me and how much time I am saving not having to travel back and forth. As such I only have been leaving the house for doctor's appointments or urgent errants.

The entire thought of having to wear a muzzle for hours at a time not only disgusts me but literally gives me physical discomfort. I have always been the first one to complain about fresh air in stuffy places and even passed out twice during a concert as a youngster. So breathing through a mask for me simply isn't an option for more than perhaps 30 minutes or so as I start to lack sufficient oxygen. Yes, I could probably convince some doctor to write me a waiver but that's not what this is about.

Today my wife and I decided to go to a sport's store to pick up a winter jacket. We didn't find much and I only spent about 30 minutes there. At the end of our time there I was feeling extremely claustrophobic and couldn't wait to go back home. The thought of having to wear that thing for hours at a time every day simply boggles my mind. The local government here (not the in the U.S.) is already A/B testing new lock down restrictions for the coming winter. But as you are probably aware this is a concerted global effort which spans all across the Western hemisphere and is even infecting the EE now.

In a nutshell: It's difficult to predict the future but I have an inkling that this is going to be the 'new normal' for many nations for years to come. At this point I have set myself a deadline of summer 2021. If mask are still mandatory in public life at that time we will pack up and emigrate to a country that isn't part of the global poz and doesn't intent on killing off its entire middle class. Central Europe was high on my list but over the past week I have seen several dominos fall, e.g. Poland, Slovenia, and Hungary I think. So I have to ask: Is there ANY escape from this?
 

Gradient

Kingfisher
So I have to ask: Is there ANY escape from this?

In the U.S.? With the sheep compliance rate what it is? I'd say not.

As I've mentioned elsewhere, my area's "Mask Gulag Rules" allow exceptions for "people with any medical condition that may be exacerbated by the wearing of a mask." There is no requirement to say what the condition is, nor is there a requirement to have a medical waiver. Merely saying that one has "a condition" is sufficient to go maskless.

However, almost no one is affording themselves of that option. 99% are meekly wearing their masks. Just like obedient little robots. None of them were wearing masks during the much worse flu seasons of a couple of years back, so I can really no longer give most of them a break by saying that they are simply afraid.

They are wearing their masks for at least one of the following reasons:
  1. Social Peer Pressure
  2. Virtue Signaling
  3. Pavlovian Obedience (to uninformed authority - ie. City Councils who make mandates just so they can be thought of as "doing something")
  4. Actual Fear of the mild flu. (I'd say less than 20%)
Whatever the reason, none of these groups are likely to have the spine rigidity needed to face down their "rulers" and demand quashing of ALL of the absurd mandates/restrictions foisted on them. They don't even have the spine to face down a minimum wage clerk at a store, much less a government official.

The masks, closing of your businesses, shuttering of your churches, squashing of your laughable 1st Amendment rights, and the general oppression will continue as long as the ruling class damn well pleases. And the overwhelmingly vast majority of U.S. Subjects (not Citizens) will take a knee, kiss the ring of their rulers, and obey.

This plandemic has given ironclad proof (both to me and to the ruling class) that the American people will immediately surrender any and all Liberty even for the mere illusion of safety.
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
Belarus has seemingly no regulation for the virus and is 100% open for travel. Its also very cheap. You can stay right in the center of Minsk for about $500 if you bypass booking platforms. Hosts prefer USD. Probably only a 30 day stay so you'd need to get a visa of some kind. Hardly anyone wears a mask, even in shops and airplanes.

Serbia is 100% open for travel. There is some regulation for masks, but its ignored to a cinsiderable extent.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Belarus has seemingly no regulation for the virus and is 100% open for travel. Its also very cheap. You can stay right in the center of Minsk for about $500 if you bypass booking platforms. Hosts prefer USD. Probably only a 30 day stay so you'd need to get a visa of some kind. Hardly anyone wears a mask, even in shops and airplanes.

Serbia is 100% open for travel. There is some regulation for masks, but its ignored to a cinsiderable extent.

Belarus sounds lovely. Is that 500 USD per month? I can only imagine how cheap Vitebsk or Brest or somewhere like that would be. Sounds a lot like Ukraine 20 years ago.
 

Zagor

Robin
I was thinking about rural living, growing food and herding cattle. Going away from urban hellholes and having your own food supply would be a major relief, but then again, i don't recall that in any communist society (and we're heading toward one) living rurally saved you from the boot of the regime.
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
Belarus sounds lovely. Is that 500 USD per month? I can only imagine how cheap Vitebsk or Brest or somewhere like that would be. Sounds a lot like Ukraine 20 years ago.


Yes. USD. I usually book a short stay and then get a 20% discount by booking in cash, using reputable Booking.com hosts.

$500 pm:



Looking at Vitebsk the entry price if $325.

The food was so cheap I guessed it is subsidised. 500g of peanuts = about $1 and protein bars for about $0.33 (not small ones). The same ones in Moldova are twice the price.

I expected the people to be exactly like Russians, but they are not. They are very calm. They remind me of what you hear about the old Slavs who lived in the forests, wearing their modest white dress and pure in nature. However, Minsk women are highly Westernised. I would say the most Westernised of any Slavic country I have been to. But I suspect that if you go out to small towns and can speak Russian it would be a very good place to meet women. It is also very clean, even seemingly in villages. It is hard to believe the wages are so low.
 

Sandstorm

Kingfisher
Yes. USD. I usually book a short stay and then get a 20% discount by booking in cash, using reputable Booking.com hosts.

$500 pm:



Looking at Vitebsk the entry price if $325.

The food was so cheap I guessed it is subsidised. 500g of peanuts = about $1 and protein bars for about $0.33 (not small ones). The same ones in Moldova are twice the price.

I expected the people to be exactly like Russians, but they are not. They are very calm. They remind me of what you hear about the old Slavs who lived in the forests, wearing their modest white dress and pure in nature. However, Minsk women are highly Westernised. I would say the most Westernised of any Slavic country I have been to. But I suspect that if you go out to small towns and can speak Russian it would be a very good place to meet women. It is also very clean, even seemingly in villages. It is hard to believe the wages are so low.
what are the wifi speeds like?
 

redpillage

Ostrich
Gold Member
I was thinking about rural living, growing food and herding cattle. Going away from urban hellholes and having your own food supply would be a major relief, but then again, i don't recall that in any communist society (and we're heading toward one) living rurally saved you from the boot of the regime.

That's exactly what I'm talking about. I was thinking of buying a small farm in Slovenia. For one I love the fact that they are increasingly tying economic relations with Hungary and the rest of the Visegrád group of nations. The vistas of course are gorgeous and people seemed to be pretty friendly - even greeting me on the street with dober večer or zdravo, which I find unusual for Eastern Europe. Then again it seems that the EU influence is growing there as well and at least the English language Slovenian media appears very leftists. What realy concerns me is the new state of epidemic that was just enacted. If that's a sign of what's to come then we may have to look for greener pastures.

@gework - I know almost nothing about Belarus. Will have to do a bit of research on that and perhaps visit once things open up again. Any particular places you would recommend? Also places to stay away from?
 

Mountaineer

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Belarus just imposed a 10 day quarantine if you're coming there from Poland, as I heard on the radio. If they don't succeed to color revolution Luka then I expect nothing short of war on their soil.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
That's exactly what I'm talking about. I was thinking of buying a small farm in Slovenia. For one I love the fact that they are increasingly tying economic relations with Hungary and the rest of the Visegrád group of nations. The vistas of course are gorgeous and people seemed to be pretty friendly - even greeting me on the street with dober večer or zdravo, which I find unusual for Eastern Europe. Then again it seems that the EU influence is growing there as well and at least the English language Slovenian media appears very leftists. What realy concerns me is the new state of epidemic that was just enacted. If that's a sign of what's to come then we may have to look for greener pastures.

@gework - I know almost nothing about Belarus. Will have to do a bit of research on that and perhaps visit once things open up again. Any particular places you would recommend? Also places to stay away from?

I hitchhiked around the Balkans and Slovenia was the easiest place to catch a ride. The people are indeed a great deal more friendly than the other Balkan countries. Some of that I chalked up to it being more aligned with the 'western' way of thought. It was certainly easier to meet girls there.

I worked short term for a woman who had a small farm near lake Bled. It was an insanely beautiful spot and as I helped her ready the place for winter, I would find myself day dreaming about the farm being all mine with my young wife and children all around me readying for the coming snows. Good choice.
 

EndlessGravity

Kingfisher
I've had to explain to several people: you should be careful making your living choices on the mask mandates. Unless your lifestyle is super flexible, you can't be sure that your next place won't lock down or put masks in place at the drop of a hat.

Rural and small areas seem better but the corporations there try to enforce it to, to varying degrees of success. I'm not saying not to move but just realize, no where is probably safe long term.

Florida and Georgia

Also, no. Both of these are a mixed bag.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
The only metric I would ever say that would guarantee - somewhat - a safe future for its people, are places that actually have some love and appreciation for the people and place they govern.

Unfortunately, the current list is small and not always run by the most honest of people.
 

redpillage

Ostrich
Gold Member
I hitchhiked around the Balkans and Slovenia was the easiest place to catch a ride. The people are indeed a great deal more friendly than the other Balkan countries. Some of that I chalked up to it being more aligned with the 'western' way of thought. It was certainly easier to meet girls there.

I worked short term for a woman who had a small farm near lake Bled. It was an insanely beautiful spot and as I helped her ready the place for winter, I would find myself day dreaming about the farm being all mine with my young wife and children all around me readying for the coming snows. Good choice.

You are basically describing my retirement plan - LOL :) I spent a bit of time around Lake Bled but it was a bit too touristy to me. The area around Lake Bohinj was a lot more to my liking. Then again all one has to do is to drive out 10 minutes and you're basically in rural Slovenia and will only see the occasional tourist. It's still a bit of a secret destination despite the fact that it's being hyped hard in the travel mags. Some of the most beautiful landscapes I've ever seen and I've been around the planet.

The people and most of the women in Slovenia seem very friendly as well (plus easy on the eye) and if I wasn't already happily married I would consider finding a wife there. Cost of living seems reasonable once one gets away from the tourist traps. Food is amazing - many people don't seem to like it but I would probably put on weight there.

Of course the long winters are a completely different story. Prepare yourself for nearly six months of snow plus a lot of rain during the spring/summer/fall season. But if I have a choice between the globalist poz and shitty weather - I'll pick the weather every time. My wife seems very amenable to the idea despite me telling her that it would be a tough adjustment.

Does anyone have any insights on broadband availability outside of the big cities in Slovenia?
 
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