Escape From 'The New Normal'?

ginsu

Kingfisher
It doesn't matter so much which country you are in. The biggest difference is if you can live in a place where the news dont matter as was mentioned before. Dont just blindly listen to the media and politicians, they are hyping up their power and rules a lot, when in fact on the ground things could be much more relaxed and not enforced. The best we can do is a very rural place far away from big cities. Dont try to look for the best country, just look for the best region that you will enjoy living in regardles of the rules that are written down on a national level.
 

barrythecyborg

Kingfisher
If Estonia is only "recommending" masks that still makes it one of the most open countries on the European continent.

Does anyone have any boots on the ground info from Serbia, even second hand?

Second hand... I met a guy in Belarus who ran there to escape this shit.

He was banking on the fact that the people don't trust the government.

They tried to enforce restrictions on the basis of inflated numbers,and 1000 docs signed a petition calling the government out and demanding for them to be held accountable.

He's moved on to another state though. I'll find out why.
 

barrythecyborg

Kingfisher
If Estonia is only "recommending" masks that still makes it one of the most open countries on the European continent.

Does anyone have any boots on the ground info from Serbia, even second hand?

From my friend in Belgrade;

"I heard from a local that the government is intending to implement social distancing measures in one of their feasts kinda like the Serbian thanksgiving.

It’s the same [adult word; banned by admin. Earmuffs RVFers] agenda everywhere...

These are my people, Serbia ticks all the boxes"

 

Muscovite

Robin
Orthodox
Dont try to look for the best country, just look for the best region that you will enjoy living in regardles of the rules that are written down on a national level.
This is good advice. Moving from country to country is a waste of time. You're gonna get stuck somewhere. Whether the virus gets better or worse isn't that relevant. Rules are changing overnight so it's better to be in a place you're familiar with (friends, family, support etc.) and move out into the countryside. Even the virus disappears, there'll be something else. Better to have a long-term plan where you can be at peace no matter what goes down.

Hopping borders is short-term, a waste of time and money. Money and time that could be used on a longer term solution.
 

barrythecyborg

Kingfisher
This is good advice. Moving from country to country is a waste of time. You're gonna get stuck somewhere. Whether the virus gets better or worse isn't that relevant. Rules are changing overnight so it's better to be in a place you're familiar with (friends, family, support etc.) and move out into the countryside. Even the virus disappears, there'll be something else. Better to have a long-term plan where you can be at peace no matter what goes down.

Hopping borders is short-term, a waste of time and money. Money and time that could be used on a longer term solution.

Except to move now to a place you want to be long term...

I.e somewhere with no Strong Cities.
 

Enhanced Eddie

Pelican
Gold Member
I've always been hopping borders all my life. Stayed out of tax systems everywhere. If I stop border hopping now I suddenly have to pay both corporate (CFC rules) and income taxes (or at least dividend taxes).

I don't see it as a foregone conclusion that the NWO has won and that the medical gulag is here to stay.

Appreciate the info on Serbia! If you hear more, would you share it? I gotta make a decision to go there or not in the next 2-3 weeks. Thanks man.
 
Literally anywhere outside of the city, and then prepare to bug-in at any moment, rather than bug out. Seems like a more reasonable approach, to find a nice location and just hunker down. The more rural the better, as long as you have access to plenty of food and resources. I've even thought about moving to a larger island in the Philippines or similar country. Would be a good place if society collapsed along with the food chains, as those living on the islands don't need to rely as much on the outside world, as they are much more adept at surviving from the ocean, and can more easily protect from nefarious visitors.
 
I would be okay with doing 5-10days in quarantine if that means I can be free for a few months afterwards. Which countries with very low levels of spread and restrictions are open to travel with quarantine?
 
Go rural, go guerilla. Keep a connection line open to major cities for supplies until your own camp can self-sustain. And for others who need to get out. Funnel all the like-minded people into your own crew out of the cities, and the weakening of the cities will be their downfall. Leave babylon behind and let her suffer without you, let her not drown you with her. With a large enough guerilla force the cities can be retaken later, but the bolsheviks right now are not strategically-superior nor physically stronger, they rely on deception and tricking others to do their bidding for them. Must fight fire with fire. I will not leave for another country only to be bereft of whatever infrastructure and networks I had been building in the previous one.
 

redpillage

Ostrich
Gold Member
It doesn't matter so much which country you are in. The biggest difference is if you can live in a place where the news dont matter as was mentioned before. Dont just blindly listen to the media and politicians, they are hyping up their power and rules a lot, when in fact on the ground things could be much more relaxed and not enforced. The best we can do is a very rural place far away from big cities. Dont try to look for the best country, just look for the best region that you will enjoy living in regardles of the rules that are written down on a national level.

You make good points and going rural first is part of my plan. However, that may only be a short term bandaid solution. Consider for a moment that mandatory inoculations are being floated in the mainstream media already. I don't know about you but I'm not about to let Bill Gates inject me or my family with whatever experimental nano particle cocktail he's cooked up in his bio-lab. There may come the time when you can't even leave your city or local region without a health pass - PERMANENTLY.

Again, this is a worst case scenario and it may be hyperbole. But if we have learned one thing over the past year then it is that governments across the West seem to have a hare trigger approach to implementing authoritarian measures on their populations. So we better be prepared and have an exit plan in place BEFORE a big exodus has been put into motion. Which means local contacts, boots on the ground, a detailed plan, and a variety of possible locations with a network of people willing to help each other.

There's been a lot of talk here on this and other forums about how 'disenchfranchised' Europeans and White Americans are these days. Well, to be honest, it's our own fault. We have all been seduced by popular culture over the past few decades and in the process have let governments atomize us down to the point where only 1/3 of children grow up in a 2-parent household. We pride ourselves on going it alone but when faced with a group of Antifa or a bunch of gang members we are essentially easy prey as we don't have any backup. No family, no band of brothers, nobody we served with during military service, nothing.

What we need to do is to start networking and assisting each other. Perhaps this thread can aid this process, at least among long term posters who trust each other.
 
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I think this thread could really benefit from a reading list of authors that lived through various kinds of dictatorship, civil war and authoritarianism.

As a European I would be particularly interested in East German and Hungarian authors, as these were former free and prosperous nations, that became the kind of Communism Plus+ that the Sovjets used to market themselves to the West.

Expatriating as a political refugee is common throughout history. Most of the jews in charge of the Biden/Harris campaigns are descendents, literal or spiritual of jews fleeing Stalin's purges.
 

barrythecyborg

Kingfisher
I think this thread could really benefit from a reading list of authors that lived through various kinds of dictatorship, civil war and authoritarianism.

As a European I would be particularly interested in East German and Hungarian authors, as these were former free and prosperous nations, that became the kind of Communism Plus+ that the Sovjets used to market themselves to the West.

Expatriating as a political refugee is common throughout history. Most of the jews in charge of the Biden/Harris campaigns are descendents, literal or spiritual of jews fleeing Stalin's purges.

Interesting... I was just thinking the opposite.

I just realised I'm inviting a lot of this bullshit into my reality, when actually I'm pretty blessed right now.

It's unreal what's happening elsewhere, and what's likely coming in a lot of places, but it's not happening around me, so why delve into it?

Obviously there are valuable lessons to be learnt from studying history, but I'm not sure of the value of vicariously experiencing the horrors of the gulag when it's a beautiful autumn day and no one I know is suffering.
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
A few years ago I read a book about an English chap, William Blacker, who traveled to Romania in the 90s shortly after the Iron Curtain was lifted. He found a number of villages that were unscathed by modernity or Communist rule. They continued to live, work and trade in these agrarian enclaves as they had done hundreds of years. Perhaps Romania was an anomaly, certainly Stalin left no stoned unturned, but nevertheless these villages existed and likely many others did too. Blacker was so besotted with the life there he found, he stayed for a number of years. Sadly, Blacker wrote, in the end it was capitalism, technology and the lure of an easier, more comfortable life that broke up these solid communities, as over the years he stayed there and later revisited the area he witnessed their decline.

I found the book quite a powerful read as I'd had experience of living and working in agrarian communities in Greece back in the 70s and 80s (I'm an old fag). Although it wasn't quite the same antiquated idyll that Blacker found, most Greek farmers had long abandoned the horse for tractors and pickup trucks, village life was still intact. Men congregated in the village cafes and women would gossip together while shelling peas. I think the big difference, thinking back, was the influence TV had on those folk. Not many homes had their own TV sets, but most cafes had them and the men would sit in front of it, swinging their worry beads. I had many a conversation with Greek men who would often speak about how poor they were and what rich and comfortable lives foreigners, such as myself, led. I would try to impress upon them, in vain, that they had something we in the West had lost or were losing: cohesive communities. The trinkets of modernity spoke much louder than my words and, of course, progress won out, at it unfailing does.

For those interested the book is: Along the Enchanted Way by William Blacker.
 
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